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  • Here's the question a rejected job candidate emailed after her interview that eventually got her hired for another role
    Business
    Business Insider18 hours ago

    Here's the question a rejected job candidate emailed after her interview that eventually got her hired for another role

    According to Alexandra Cavoulacos and Kathryn Minshew, authors of "The New Rules of Work," it's not only possible to find out why the company turned you down — it's often advisable. Cavoulacos and Minshew are the cofounders — and COO and CEO, respectively, of careers advice and job listings site The Muse. In the book, they recommend following up with the hiring manager to ask for feedback on your interview skills.

  • News
    Investopedia4 hours ago

    Don't Retire Early

    Ask five people what it means to retire early and you're likely to get five different answers. Some would consider leaving work before age 65 as early retirement, while others would argue that it has to happen before age 45. Regardless of how you quantify “early,” saying adios to work isn't necessarily the solution to a happy and fulfilling mid-life experience. Many people who long for early retirement may have never known true job satisfaction. A better goal for some may be to shoot for a mid-life career change instead of an early retirement. Why People Retire Early Why do people retire early? Sometimes it's unplanned: a layoff, a long-term illness or caring for a loved one. In these cases,

  • Goldman has figured out the trick for making money off Amazon
    Business
    CNBC.com20 hours ago

    Goldman has figured out the trick for making money off Amazon

    Goldman has figured out the trick to making money off Amazon    8 Hours Ago | 00:39 Goldman Sachs gave its clients the best way to trade Amazon's stock and it basically came down to this: buy the shares when CEO Jeff Bezos takes out his wallet and ramps up spending. The firm cited its analysis of the company's previous three large investment cycles. It revealed shareholders saw a 44 percent return, on average, if they bought Amazon when its trailing 12-month capital expenditure spending growth first increased, versus a much lower 12 percent return if they bought when investment spending growth decreased. "While these stretches have often raised investor questions around long-term profitability,