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  • Walmart's latest move confirms the death of the American middle class as we know it
    Style
    Business Insideryesterday

    Walmart's latest move confirms the death of the American middle class as we know it

    Walmart is getting into aspirational retail — and it says a lot about the American economy. In recent months, Walmart has purchased several trendy, online retailers, including the hip fashion brand ModCloth, outdoor gear retailer Moosejaw, and shoe store ShoeBuy. ModCloth's dresses can cost between $60 and $150, whereas Walmart's dresses are usually priced between $10 and $25.

  • Wall Street fear is threatening a dramatic comeback in the stock market
    Business
    MarketWatch4 hours ago

    Wall Street fear is threatening a dramatic comeback in the stock market

    The days of tranquil, docile markets may be nearing an end. Measures of risk are rearing their heads once again, with the CBOE Volatility Index VIX, -1.22% closing at its highest level of the year in Thursday trade and jumping above its 200-day moving average, now at 13.54, Friday for the first time since December of last year (see chart below): Broadly speaking, moving averages are used by technical strategists to help to judge if short-term and long-term directional momentum in a security is intact. Right now, the VIX, also known as Wall Street’s fear gauge is creeping toward the long-term average, which suggests that it could attempt a firmer breakout, in the parlance of chart watchers. See:

  • This car from your childhood has increased in value by 58,000%
    Business
    MarketWatch10 hours ago

    This car from your childhood has increased in value by 58,000%

    What makes a car a classic? A unique cultural formula of factors, according to vehicle valuation specialists at market research group Black Book — and if they all come together the right way, you could be making big bucks selling vehicles that were once commonplace. There’s just one catch. Well, two. It would be better if you bought it in, say, 1971. And it really helps if the car in question is still in mint condition. Some cars once sold for the manufacturer’s relatively affordable suggested retail prices have years later been marked up thousands, sometimes tens of thousands of percent. The 1971 Plymouth Barracuda, for example, was once purchased for an asking price of $4,296 and is now worth