Fin - Breakout - US

Portfolios of the Wall Street Pros

Breakout

Bill Ackman: The activist investor has been known to shed a tear (at a 2009 Target shareholder's meeting following his hard-fought, very expensive and ultimately unsuccessful proxy battle for the retailer), but he didn't have a lot to cry about in 2010, when his Pershing Square portfolio saw returns of 29.7%. Ackman founded Pershing Square in 2003 with $54 million in seed money. Today the hedge fund manages more than $7 billion. Ackman, a long-term value investor, is known for swooping in when companies see short-term price drops. His portfolio is concentrated (just 12 holdings as of the end of 2010), with a heavy focus on retail and real estate holdings. Learn more about Bill Ackman's portfolio.

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Bruce Berkowitz: The Florida-based managing member of Fairholme Capital Management is coming off a year in which he easily outpaced his benchmarks, including seeing The Fairholme Fund exceed the return of the S&P 500. Berkowitz isn't above sharing the credit for his success, noting in his most recent portfolio manager's report that, "Over the past few years, Fairholme's performance is due in large part to thousands of patriots in civil service who rescued the global financial system with much intelligence and hard work." However he's gotten there, Berkowitz has made believers of his shareholders. Learn more about Bruce Berkowitz's portfolio.

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Warren Buffett: The Oracle of Omaha is to many market watchers the greatest investor who has ever lived, and in the past four-plus decades the Nebraska native has won over a legion of followers. Since he took over a failing Massachusetts textile plant called Berkshire Hathaway in the 1960s, Buffett has gone on to become one of the wealthiest people on earth. He kept the Berkshire name, and he's built an investing conglomerate loaded with insurance companies, blue-chip stocks and niche chains. His investors would tell you his approach has paid off. Learn more about Warren Buffett's portfolio.

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David Dreman: The native of Canada is best known for his value investing style, and his approach has served him well. The chairman and chief investment officer of Dreman Value Management focuses on mutual funds, pension funds, foundations and endowments funds, and as of Dec. 31, his funds managed roughly $4.9 billion. Learn more about David Dreman's portfolio.

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Ken Fisher: He's noted as an investment manager, a prolific writer and the face of Fisher Asset Management. And he's had no trouble whatsoever attracting investors. At the end of the third quarter, Fisher's funds were in charge of nearly $36 billion of investor wealth. Not one for getting too centralized in his positions, Fisher had more than 500 positions according to his most recent regulatory filings. Learn more about Ken Fisher's portfolio.

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Carl Icahn: Whether viewed as a corporate raider or an activist investor, Icahn is known for shaking things up at companies he believes are underperforming. From food and cigarette seller RJR Nabisco to video-rental chain Blockbuster and biotech-drug maker ImClone, Icahn isn't shy about diversifying his targets, and he has the clout and the money to get his way. Now the New York native heads up Icahn Enterprises, a perch that allows him to direct his team to pounce anytime and anywhere he sees deep value -- or perceives mismanagement. On March 11, 2011, Icahn announced he was closing his hedge fund to outside investors. Learn more about Carl Icahn's portfolio.

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Paul Tudor Jones: Hedge fund heavyweight and macro investor Paul Tudor Jones is well-known for predicting the Black Monday crash back in 1987 -- and tripling his earnings on short positions, pocketing an estimated $80 million to $100 million. He founded Tudor Investment Corp. in 1980 after cutting his teeth in cotton trading on the New York Cotton Exchange; now the company manages about around $11 billion in investor wealth. With a personal focus on avoiding losses rather than making money (his recent advice: Don't play earnings), he manages to do pretty well -- his net worth is somewhere around $3 billion. He also enjoys spreading the cheer around the holidays; his Greenwich, Conn., home boasts an elaborate light show each year. Learn more about Paul Tudor Jones's portfolio.

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Eddie Lampert: Sears Holdings might be his closest association, but that isn't the entire story for the man who runs ESL Investments. Lampert was a Wall Street wunderkind from his early days at Goldman Sachs in New York. He struck out on his own before he was 30, and from there it was a matter of time before he became a multibillionaire. Unfortunately for Lampert, his magic touch hasn't always been adequate protection. In 2003, he was kidnapped in Connecticut and held briefly, but he was ultimately freed by his captors unharmed. Learn more about Eddie Lampert's portfolio.

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John Paulson: The president of Paulson & Co. was already a successful hedge fund manager before the financial crisis of 2008. But it was his short sales against a variety of housing and banking assets that catapulted him into the public consciousness. Though now viewed by some individual investors as representing what's wrong with unfettered capitalism, Paulson has been a hero to his investors. Learn more about John Paulson's portfolio.

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T. Boone Pickens: When it comes to power, Pickens is truly one of the American masters. He came to fame during the corporate raider days of the 1980s, and he's turned BP Capital Management into a force of nature. In recent years, Pickens has become an advocate for alternative energy, investing millions of dollars in a Texas wind farm and pushing for natural gas as a transportation fuel. As his holdings show, though, he is not giving up on hydrocarbons just yet. Learn more about T. Boone Pickens's portfolio.

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George Soros: The Hungary-born investor might be most widely known for his British pound bet of the early 1990s, but that's just the beginning. While his short sterling play alone is believed to have netted him more than $1 billion, his funds have been some of the most successful investment vehicles since the early 1970s. Soros has spent significant energy, and dollars, in his later years on various philanthropic and political causes, but he's still closely associated with Wall Street. Learn more about George Soros's portfolio.

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Prem Watsa: Just what does the world think of Watsa? He's often called Canada's answer to Warren Buffett. That's the type of acknowledgment most any money manager or trader would be very happy to have. In addition to drawing comparisons to one of history's all-time great investors, Watsa is also the chairman and CEO of Canada's Fairfax Financial Holdings. His investing style demonstrates his interest in following the Oracle of Omaha's approach to the markets. Learn more about Prem Watsa's portfolio.

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