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Did advertisers waste more than $200 million on Super Bowl ads?

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Super Bowl ads: Did it pay to advertise this year?

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Super Bowl ads: Did it pay to advertise this year?

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Football season is officially over but the ads that made their television debut during last night’s Super Bowl will continue to clog our airwaves for months to come.

This year’s big game had nearly 50 commercials that clocked in at a cost of about $4 million per 30 seconds.

So were these ads worth the money?

Related: Are Super Bowl Ads Worth the Cost?

They're not, according to a report from advertising research group Communicus.

“Advertising should make people buy products, or at least build purchase interest. Judged against this standard, four out of five Super Bowl XLVII commercials failed to deliver,” the report says.

Successful social media Super Bowl campaigns like Oreo’s “you can dunk in the dark” tweet last year also prove that the best game-day advertising is often free. This year, JC Penney was the winner of the #HashtagBowl, the retailer purposely sent out tweets full of typos (apparently because they were "typing with mittens") leading many to believe their social media guru was drunk-tweeting. 

Related: Super Bowl ads or players’ salaries: Which cost more?

And for those of you who are wondering why so many companies choose to preview their ads online before the game this year, Yahoo Finance's Michael Santoli has an answer:

“They want people at a Super Bowl party to say, ‘Oh, come into the room, I saw this ad already and watch it because it’s really funny.'"

Related: NCAA fumbles, college football team wants to unionize

For more Super Bowl advertising analysis watch the video above. 

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