Power Pitch

  • The Open Table of Salons and Spas

    Joanna Weinstein at Power Pitch 1 yr ago

     

    Two female entrepreneurs are making over the beauty industry. And they're doing it from your phone.

    "Think Open Table, but for beauty services," says Hillary Hutcheson.

    Hillary Hutcheson and Ritika Gill founded   Beauty Booked, an app they say provides 24/7 real-time access to thousands of top salons.

    Watch the duo pitch their start-up in just 60 seconds to Sonja Hoel Perkins of Broadway Angels, Deborah Jackson, founder and CEO of Plum Alley, and Jessica Peltz, Venture Capitalist at KBS+ Ventures.

    Will the panel call Beauty Booked a beautiful thing or say, get a makeover?

    Hutcheson and Gill met working at major French cosmetics and beauty company, L'Oreal.

    "Given our busy lifestyles, we were accustomed to managing all areas of our lives online, from restaurant reservations, to travel to doctors' appointments. We couldn't understand why an online booking solution for beauty services didn't exist," the founders told CNBC.

    Beauty Booked is available on IOS, desktop and salon and spa widget on Allure.com. The founders say they plan to launch on Android this year.

  • Manning up skin care

    Heather Schnepf at Power Pitch 1 yr ago

     

    One female founder is taking on a male-dominated industry by getting under its skin. She's developed a line of men's personal care products with "edgy design and personality." Helixfounder Sindhya Valloppillil Kalghatgi says its mission "is to provide affordable luxury grooming for professional men."

    Watch Kalghatgi pitch her start-up to angel investor Nisa Amoils, Brooklyn Bridge Ventures founder Charlie O'Donnell and television personality and fashion designer Carson Kressley. Watch the video to find out if the CNBC "Power Pitch" panelists were in or out.

    Currently, these items, along with lip balm, are only available for presale. Kalghatgi told CNBC that Helix plans to roll out hair care, skincare and fragrance products next.

    This isn't the pair's first run at building a brand. Previously, they worked in various roles at major skin care companies including Zirh, which specializes in men's grooming and shaving products.

    Read More >> Say hello to 'mampering'

  • Military tech helps you pick the perfect sofa

    Joanna Weinstein at Power Pitch 1 yr ago

     

    A start-up is turning its experience in military defense systems into a high-tech app for furniture shopping. The techie behind it says the app transforms the shopping experience by helping furniture shoppers see exactly what that new sofa will look like in their living room—before they buy it.

    It's called Cimagine, and its founder, Yoni Nevo, says it's a game changer.

    Watch Nevo pitch his new technology to panelists Alicia Syrett, board member of the New York Angels, Maxwell Ryan, Apartment Therapy founder, and Nat Burgess, Corum Group president. Will the "Power Pitch" judges envision his start-up as the next big thing?

    Nevo and his wife always had trouble imagining how furniture would look in their home while shopping.

    "Our technology is different, but the expertise of our team stems from very profound roots, and is hard to find in other places," he told CNBC.

    Cimagine   crosses cutting-edge augmented reality technology with interior design into an app that allows users to drop 3-D images of furniture into any room.

    —CNBC's Ray Parisi contributed to this story.

  • Digital guard dog for finances

    Heather Schnepf at Power Pitch 1 yr ago

     

    A new app promises to turn your smartphone into a digital watchdog for personal finances. While it hunts for credit-card fraud in real time, it also searches the web for ways to save you cash while you shop. It's called BillGuard, and the app's creator, Yaron Samid, says, "BillGuard's mission is to empower people to better control, protect and do more with their money."

    Watch Samid pitch his start-up to Alicia Syrett, board member of the New York Angels, Stephanie Palmeri, principal at SoftTech VC, and David Wu, general partner at Maveron. Will the panel be in or out on his big idea? Watch the video to find out.

    Samid said he came up with the idea four years ago when his wife became the victim of credit fraud. A Google search of the fraudulent charge revealed thousands of other victims complaining about the same thing. The incident drove Samid to bring together data scientists, mathematicians and security experts to start BillGuard.

    A ccording to Samid, BillGuard has 1.2 million users, and 3,000 are signing on every day.

    Staying ahead of the curve

  • Entrepreneur: We've bottled brain power

    Heather Schnepf at Power Pitch 1 yr ago

      A group of neuroscientists has created the first energy-drink designed to give a boost to your brain. It's called truBrain, and according to the company's CEO Chris Thompson, it packs a punch that's much smarter than a jolt of caffeine.

    "Our mission is to quantify attention and productivity in the brain, and optimize performance," said Thompson.

    Watch Thompson pitch his start-up to Vast Ventures partner Nikhil Kalghatgi, Pantegrion Capital founder and CEO Alicia Syrett and Maveron principal Rebecca Kaden. Will the drink quench the CNBC "Power Pitch" panel's thirst or leave a bad taste in their mouths? Watch the video to find out.

    Thompson is the entrepreneur behind the smart-drink start-up, but the brain power behind the recipe comes from two UCLA researchers, Aida Attar and Andrew Hill, who lead the research and development.

    Thompson said FDA approval is not necessary because the ingredients have been safely used over the counter for decades.

    During the "Power Pitch" segment, Syrett asked when she could expect to see truBrain's scientists' studies on brain waves published in a medical journal.

  • Start-up delivers flowers on demand

    Heather Schnepf at Power Pitch 1 yr ago

    Sending flowers is common practice for saying "thank you" or "just because." However, co-founder of flower delivery start-up UrbanStems, Ajay Kori, said, "Sending flowers online today relies on a really inefficient process that can be really frustrating." He said his on-demand delivery start-up aims to nip those inefficiencies in the bud.

    Watch the above video to see Kori pitch his start-up to a panel with Kelly Hoey, an angel investor and advisor to early stage companies, Kanyi Maqubela, venture partner at Collaborative Fund, and Jenny Lefcourt, partner at venture capital firm Freestyle. Will this start-up blossom, or will the panel nip it in the bud? Watch the video to see what happens.

    Quality flowers quickly

    During the segment, Maqubela asked about the cost of customer acquisition, and how UrbanStems plans to compete with the industry's front-runners.

    "We're less than half the price of traditional players," Kori said. He added that customers receive a notification that their orders are right at the recipient's door.

    Lefcourt then asked how much UrbanStems makes on a typical bouquet delivery.

  • Start-up hopes to take its ski boot to the apex

    Joanna Weinstein at Power Pitch 1 yr ago

    With ski season in full swing, one Colorado start-up is revamping the traditional ski boot. Unlike those old-school boots, Apex Ski Boots founder Denny Hanson says, you'll find his comfortable.

    Watch Hanson pitch his start-up to a panel with Dennis Crowley, a former ski and snowboard instructor and Foursquare founder, Sam Moulton, executive editor of Outside Magazine , and Alicia Syrett, a lifelong skier and New York Angels board member.

    Will this panel on CNBC's "Power Pitch" call the boots Black Diamond worthy? Click the video to find out.

    Packing Powder

    A ski industry veteran and skier of 60 years, Hanson is no bunny to the slopes. He co-founded Hanson Ski Boots with his brother Chris. The two introduced a rear entry ski boot in the 1970s. The goal then was to make getting in and out of ski boots easier.

    With Apex Ski Boots, a start-up founded in 2008, the Hansons are going for comfort.

    "The biggest complaint from skiers of all ages and abilities is that their boots are uncomfortable," Denny Hanson told CNBC.

    When customers want to ski, they slide the inner boot into the rigid outer shell of the boot.

    Full speed ahead