The Exchange

Twitter Owes You Money. Here's How to Find Out How Much

The Exchange
A trader raises his hand just before the Twitter Inc. IPO begins on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York
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A trader raises his hand just before the Twitter Inc. IPO begins on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York, November 7, 2013. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Twitter (TWTR) finished its first day as a publicly traded company on Thursday with a closing price of $44.90, down from an opening trade of $45.10 but up a cool 73% from its IPO price of $26. The offering made Twitter's founders and leaders rich. Very rich.

Now, if you're one of the company's 230 million users, you helped out, right? So what's your share of the riches?

There's an app for that.

Related:
Patrick Stewart, Child Activist, Cop Help Rin in Twitter IPO

A nifty tool created by Time allows you to plug in any Twitter username to discover exactly how valuable your Twitter Feed is to the company. According to Time, Justin Bieber tops the list of most valuable tweeters, and is owed some $20.9 million for his prolific work on the site.

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Patrick Stewart is full of win on Twitter

How about one of the men who helped ring the opening bell for Twitter, beloved actor Patrick Stewart? Time's calculator has him owed $13,631, based on his nearly 730,000 followers and Tweet rate of 0.6 tweets per day.

Pop singer Katy Perry, who averages three tweets per day and has nearly 47 million followers, looks to be owed about $4.4 million.

To come up with their calculator, Time used Twitter's claim of delivering 200 billion Tweets per day and divided that by the company's $24.9 billion value after the first day of trading. That comes to 12.45 cents "per daily eyeball on the site." Time then factored in tweets per day, the user's number of followers and an estimate of how engaged those followers actually are.

Will these celebrities, or anyone else using Twitter, actually see this money? Obviously no.

"The largest hole in this estimate is that the value of Twitter reflects not its current user base but it's potential to grow," said Time. "So go ahead and give back about half of your earnings -- if you're feeling honest."

And the hype surrounding Twitter's initial public offering is already beginning to wear off on day two of trading. The stock is trading down approximatley 3% on Friday.