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U.S. Workers Hate Their Jobs the Most

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U.S. workers love work least
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Workers in the United States had the highest level of dissatisfaction about work among people surveyed in seven countries by Monster Worldwide and GfK.

People around the world complain about their jobs, but U.S. workers hate going to the office most.

In a recent study sponsored by Monster.com and conducted by market research company GfK, just 53% of U.S. workers said they liked or loved their jobs, with 15% saying they disliked or hated their jobs. That was the highest level of dissatisfaction among workers surveyed in seven countries. Another 31% were merely satisfied.

Canadians were the happiest at work, with 64% liking or loving their jobs and only 7% saying they were dissatisfied, according to the survey. Workers in the Netherlands and India were close behind.

The results in part may reflect the longer average workweek and lesser amounts of vacation and leave time for U.S. workers. Also, shrinking health care and retirement benefits were the biggest concerns for U.S. workers in a Gallup poll in August.

Frustrated dreams of upward mobility or the growing gap between rich and poor in the United States may also have been a factor. Lower-paid U.S. workers were the least satisfied with their jobs, as 21% of those who made under $50,000 reported they disliked or hated work. Only 10% of those making more than $50,000 were as dissatisfied. Workers in the Northeast and West were more satisfied than people at work in the Midwest and South, the survey found.

The survey gathered answers from 8,000 people, including 1,007 in the United States, Monster said.

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