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Silver Wheaton Corp. Message Board

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  • Reply to

    US in recession?

    by okeypoke 16 hours ago

    “...The lies, however, do turn markets.”

    We have to disagree a bit here, if what you mean is that the continued upward move of the major indices is due to lies. We interpret this as central banks and their corporate buddies driving the averages upwards (manipulation). The proof of this is in the volume figures.

    Volume continues to drop leaving behind mostly those with the capacity to manipulate in the upward direction. Those who have ceased participating have not as yet bailed out (because they are captive). When everyone heads for the exits the banksters and their buddies will be picking up the pieces, they hope. Bargain basement prices will result because the drop will be so severe that attempts to exit will be frozen by extreme downward volume. There will be mostly sellers and few buyers with many of the sellers represented by pension fund management who in reality are central bank agents and part of the scam to rip off those who have had their funds invested for them as a truly captive audience.

  • @ mine PINSON in NV................a reverse split would change this 9 cent stock to $9 earning $3 instead of 3 cents.................READ mgmt.'s words IMO

  • Reply to

    US in recession?

    by okeypoke 16 hours ago

    We've not ever gotten out of the recession. Only those that actually believe government promulgated fantasy would think so. The lies, however, do turn markets.

  • From Barron's:

    Economists were ratcheting down their GDP estimates for the current quarter last week, especially after another shockingly poor report on durable goods orders, this time for February, was released. A 10% real rise in the greenback shaves about 1% off U.S. gross domestic product, JPMorgan’s economists estimate.

    Whatever the cause, the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta’s tracking model for GDP shows growth of just 0.2% as of March 25, down from a 0.3% estimate on March 17. The conventional wisdom still calls for annualized growth in the current quarter of close to 2%, not much lower than the fourth-quarter final estimate of 2.2%.

    But based on the durable goods data, the U.S. economy is in a “recession in all but name,” according to David P. Goldman, head of Americas Research for Reorient Financial Markets in Hong Kong.

    “When oil prices crashed late last year, we argued that the net effect would be mildly negative for the U.S. economy—terrible for capex, marginally positive for consumers. We’ve seen the beginning of a collapse in capex, but not the benefit to consumers,” who have been averse to spending the windfall from cheaper fuel prices, preferring instead to save it.

    “Forecasters were beguiled by larger-than-expected jobs numbers, even though the vast majority of new jobs were in low-paid, labor-intensive, revolving-door occupations. More jobs in low-wage industries haven’t persuaded Americans to spend more. Meanwhile, the oil-price bust threatens the 40% of U.S. corporate capex devoted to energy.”

    The tale of the tape: February durable goods orders dropped 1.4% after the 2% downwardly revised pop in January. Core capital goods orders—nondefense orders, excluding volatile aircraft orders—also fell 1.4%, after a downwardly revised decline of 0.1%. It was the sixth consecutive monthly decline.

  • Reply to

    Patient and tulipmania, ...

    by hapiwondrers Mar 24, 2015 3:46 PM

    Past leadership of this country, that represented the People, fought vociferously against the likes of Nicholas Biddle and similar leaders before and thereafter. It is quite obvious that human compassion does not reside within the skins of central bankers. They are the epitome of evil bringing untold suffering to billions of people worldwide fomenting wars and depressions in the boom and bust cycles that have existed ever since becoming de facto governments, rewarding themselves monetarily in the process.

    It will, in fact, require a worldwide meltdown of the policies and actions of central banks to be rid of them. What exactly “rid” means remains to be seen, since the very founding of t his country there were those who promoted the idea of central banking and fiat money. That needs to be remembered when chasing the possible increase in valuations of the precious metals (PM) sector. Now, due to worldwide electronic communications, these people work in concert to destroy any semblance of a return to a specie system of money since they all have a streak of tyranny embedded within holding in alliance like minded others, no matter what country they operate in. Jefferson said it best when he considered them more dangerous than “standing armies”. Eventually, at some unknown date in the future, far or near, if people wish some semblance of their freedom to return they will need to take whatever steps are necessary to end the reign of terror imposed by central banks, everywhere.

    When looking at the political season bearing down on us there is nary a one of the potential candidates for public office that will forcefully recognize the threat of central banking to peace and prosperity as the cornerstone of their public statements to represent the People. ALL of these candidates, by remaining silent on this issue, identify themselves as being in the pockets of the central bankers in order to promote their candidacies.

  • and a few other which I forgot..gold up today but the gold stocks were mostly down..go figure?

  • Reply to

    Patient and tulipmania, ...

    by hapiwondrers Mar 24, 2015 3:46 PM

    Man the barricades!. Whooops! Look out! Here comes a drone.

  • Reply to

    Patient and tulipmania, ...

    by hapiwondrers Mar 24, 2015 3:46 PM

    Wise men knew, though, that specie money would serve as financial handcuffs on government. They could have never taxed sufficiently to swell government as the fiat system has enabled before the people would have rebelled. Of course, the fiat changed all that and has been the mechanism used to slowly reduce the once burgeoning middle class.

  • Reply to

    Patient and tulipmania, ...

    by hapiwondrers Mar 24, 2015 3:46 PM

    Actually we don’t need Congress to stamp bullion. That was Hamilton’s idea (the Rothschild’s agent). Who knows what evil designs he might have created had Burr not put a stop to his perfidy. In today’s world of instant communications the people could decide whom to trust. Those that try to cheat would quickly be put out of business, perhaps via the penalty expressed in the Coinage Act of 1792 or a current reincarnation of it. Certainly Congress has proven time and again to be untrustworthy.

    And “ ... why do we think things are being done in our best interest? Has it ever worked out that way?” Yes. But it took somebody like President Andrew Jackson to stand up to Nickolas Biddle and say #$%$. That also requires an in depth look at whether Yellen has a coterie of hit-men at the ready and some insiders to quell the release of her death squad.

  • Da Wall Street boyz are still playing with themselves. Volume has contracted once again and the DJIA lost 293 points. It must be getting very boring for them not having to deal with reality. Just push “Print” and presto chango, a billion here, a billion there... Only they know how to do a very professional circle jerk.

  • Market's down. No faith the Fed will see to it that prices go up. Well if everybody's scared and selling off, let's hope the sellers park some of their cash in some form of gold. It makes sense that's where the capital coming out of this market ought to go. Gold always benefits from fear.

  • Reply to

    Patient and tulipmania, ...

    by hapiwondrers Mar 24, 2015 3:46 PM

    Tying knots in the minds of the people.
    Congress only has the power to stamp bullion; to regulate the value thereof and of foreign coin. Knowing there is no constitutional provision for a central bank (although the current one is the third such—the previous two being allowed to die a fitting death), why do we think things are being done in our best interests? Has it ever worked out that way?

  • …the environment is, what I've always said it has to be for that to be true: where day after day the market is up, the dollar is down, and gold is up. These indicators are the ones expected if we know inflation has been given free reign to occur. The Fed's recent stance seems to be a positive nod to encourage inflation, so let's see...

    On another topic of interest to SLW followers, former SLW Chairman, current SLW board of Director, Harvard Grad, Eduardo Luna and his tiny, penny-gold-mining producer, Rochester Resources, has just consolidated shares to only 13 million plus. RCT's share price has since backed off, yet may be having a good report coming out in April, since it has yet to bring forward a quarter where it's newly-expanded mill has processed high grade ore at capacity. RCT might be a good spec if gold is going consistently up from here, and RCT can establish more growth. Luna did great things in the "growth" departments for SLW, and before that, as a President of the Mexican mining operations for Goldcorp. RCT is in a pretty good part of the world for high-grade gold and silver. Maybe EL can hit the home run there too... We'll see.

  • ...is there really a difference when it comes to Yellin’s doublespeak?

  • Yep. Still looks like the Wall Street Wizards of MANIPULATION are having a more difficult time as they play with themselves. Yahoo Finance reports that yesterday’s DJIA volume was 1.7B while the DJIA and NYSE averages were basically flat yesterday and today. Volume today was 98.0M, which is a 94.2% drop in volume. Presumably those poor SOBs at only one company sponsored retirement plan could account for DJIA volume. Of course that is where company employee outside investment managers will take their cues from the banksters to send employee retirement plans into the toilet, only to pick up the shares later at bargain basement prices. Don’t be surprised if Calpers demands their pound of flesh from Californians out there because of their “lawful” mandate for a minimum rate of return for public employees, meaning Californians will pick up the loss. He he he. Stupid is as stupid does when it comes to the left coast as many Californians with retirement plans will learn the wages of socialism.

    But, not to worry; it’s easier for the banksters to manipulate in the millions than it is the billions.

    It is unlikely that a majority of those with retirement plans containing stocks will wake up to what’s ahead for them. We know one individual who likes to crow about the enormous gains experienced in the company’s plan. And this guy is an “engineer”? He thoroughly discounts the intelligent decision of those who took their money and left the company. UP! UP! And away; Superman would say. Might as well talk to a brick wall rather than people like this.

  • Yes SLW has gained value as the DJIA has remained flat in comparison. But notice also what took place in late 2008. When markets crash, which is likely because of the worldwide debt load, people throw the baby out with the bath water and that becomes the time to buy. The next crash will make the one in 2008 look mild in comparison. When will this happen? We are probably very close because volume has contracted to the point of near insignificance on the major indices. The trick is to wait for the hammer to fall, bringing down these averages to reflect the real world.

SLW
19.11-0.51(-2.60%)12:38 PMEDT