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Nokia Corporation Message Board

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  • The EU Charter does formally refer to the US as the cradle of competition while the US informally refers to the EU as the cradle of the welfare state.

    Do you know why you never see gang wars in large scale poultry farms.

    Because they are all chicken. ;-)

  • The patents component of Microsoft's recent deal with Nokia is far-reaching and complex. But it's also potentially lucrative for both companies.Microsoft and Nokia announced on September 3 that Microsoft would be buying Nokia's handset business and licensing various patents.

    Microsoft and Nokia already had a cross-patent-licensing deal in place, dating back to the two companies' original agreement via which Nokia went all-in on Windows Phone in 2011. I asked Microsoft officials for more details on what was covered by this original cross-licensing deal and was told that was not something on which Microsoft would comment.

    That said, Microsoft officials are commenting rather extensively on the the many twists and turns of the new patent-licensing agreement they are striking with Nokia.

    Here's what the Softies have said so far:

    Microsoft is acquiring outright 8,500 "design" patents from Nokia. These patents are what distinguish the physical features of one mobile device from another, officials said during a conference call explaining the deal.

    On top of that, Microsoft is licensing on a non-exclusive basis for $2.7 billion another set of 30,000 "utility" patents which Nokia will continue to own. This group of patents includes all of Nokia's patents -- except for the Nokia Siemens Network (NSN) telecom infrastructure patents -- and will be used by Microsoft across a variety of products and devices, not just phones. Microsoft officials have said they'll be converting the 10-year license it obtained to a perpetual license after the original 10-year license is up. This will mean that Microsoft will have patent coverage for this body of patents for the life of all of those patents.On the press and analyst call on September 3, Microsoft Executive Vice President and General Counsel Brad Smith said:

    "One of the reasons we focused so much on securing this license, one of the reasons it has a high price tag, is because of the very substantial value of Nokia's patent portfolio. When we look at the industry, and in particular, when we look at patents that are relevant to wireless connectivity using the CDMA standard or the GSM standard or 3G or 4G technologies, we really believe that Nokia has one of the two most valuable portfolios in the industry. The other is Qualcomm's."

    Nokia has more than 60 patent licenses with various third parties, company officials have said, and Microsoft gets the protections and benefits of all of these. Qualcomm, with which Nokia negotiated a 15-year license that went into effect in 2008 is one of them. Qualcomm obtained a number of Nokia patents as part of this deal. Microsoft "now benefit(s) from that arrangement," said Smith.

    Other companies with whom Nokia has patent agreements include IBM, Motorola Mobility and Motorola Solutions, as noted by Florian Mueller, author of the FOSS Patents blog. (Microsoft is one of Mueller's clients, as he has disclosed previously.) Microsoft and Nokia shared this information in a slide deck meant to supplement its conference call yesterday.

    "This means that a Motorola-Nokia license deal struck a few years ago apparently goes with Nokia's wireless devices business," Mueller blogged. "As a result, Google's Motorola can't sue Microsoft's future smartphone business for the remaining term of that agreement," he claimed.In 2011, Microsoft and Samsung signed an Android-centric patent license deal, via which Samsung pays Microsoft. That deal will extend to the wireless device business that Microsoft will own after the Nokia deal closes without requiring any additional payments, Mueller said. He added, however, that Samsung may still need a license to cover "various Nokia non-standard-essential patents," Mueller.

    "Microsoft will also benefit from its prior or continuing agreements with Apple, LG, Nortel, Kodak, and others at no additional cost" according to the aforementioned slide deck.

    Few real specifics are known about Microsoft and Apple's cross-patent deals, as Mueller blogged. LG signed a patent-protection license with Microsoft in January 2012. And Nortel's patents were acquired by a consortium that included Microsoft in 2011.

    Et tu, Nokia?
    Nokia is no stranger to fighting over its intellectual property (IP), as Apple and HTC both know.

    As part of the newly minted Microsoft cross-patent licensing deal, Nokia apparently is now free to pursue patent-protection arrangements with the same set of Android phone and device makers with whom Microsoft has signed patent-protection licenses, as Reuters reported this week. Nokia officials aren't specifying which, if any, of those companies are in its sights. But among those with whom Microsoft has signed Android patent-protection deals are Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble, Buffalo, Compal, General Dynamics, HTC, LG Electronics, Nikon, Pegatron, and Velocity One last aside: Microsoft watcher Gina Smith has speculated that Microsoft may have left itself open to potential antitrust objections on the basis that it's now one of the largest, if not the largest, single player in mobile-telecom IP.

    I asked Mueller (who, again, for disclosure's sake, counts Microsoft among his paid clients) about this.

    "There are two things that no antitrust authority can ever object to in connection with patents: A voluntarily-made, non-exclusive license deal that allows one company to use another's patented inventions; and an asset deal that involves a certain business but does not include a transfer of the patents," he opined.

    "Microsoft is not really building or leveraging a 'monopoly' here," Mueller said. "If it wanted a monopoly in wireless patents, it would have to actually buy Nokia's technical patents, which it doesn't under the deal just announced, and a lot of other companies' patents as well."

  • Thank you nokialivelongandprosper for your labor and producing precise figures with dates that include the whole truth. To all the good people on this ship may you all live long and prosper.

  • Honda is hoping the addition of its new Display Audio infotainment technology will be a selling point for the 2014 Civic, which went on sale on Wednesday.

    Honda has added Siri Eyes Free and Here Maps technology to its cars, set to bring drivers and passengers several apps and services while driving.

    Icons resembling smartphone apps will be displayed on a 7-inch capacitive touchscreen within the Civic thanks to Display Audio. Pandora is built into the interface in case the traditional radio just isn't cutting, along with a phonebook app, social media, and other streaming services.

    Honda's Display Audio technology also adds HondaLink to its vehicles. Customers can purchase a $60 navigation app from the App Store, powered by Nokia's Here maps, to beam directions from their iPhone to the 7-inch display over the HondaLink technology.

    The inclusion of Here maps into a car is a big win for Nokia. Like navigation systems found in other cars, Here maps will bring the ability to search by point of interest, text search, or previous locations, routes can be pre-planned on a smartphone and will display on the vehicle's touchscreen, and turn-by-turn routing guidance is available through the vehicle's audio system.

    Display Audio also includes Siri Eyes Free, which will allow drivers to access the iPhone's Siri technology by pressing the "talk" button on the steering wheel. Users can then use their voice to send and read text messages and e-mails, set up calendar entries, reminders and alarms, check the weather, access turn-by-turn voice navigation, and hear sports scores and stock quotes.

    Past the 2014 Civic, Honda plans to include Display Audio with Here Maps and Siri Eyes Free into the 2015 fit.

  • referring to my last post...Looks like this, precisely, is a policy NOK management is currently implementing.

  • It is a shot in the bow of google, sam, and silicon valley. The Europeans are having enough of the lack of respect for NOK's IP.
    Allies deserve mutual respect. In the end it all is about the business.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    Nokia Co. (ADR) Company Profile

    by blimpsrus2001 3 hours ago

    It is coming bill :)

  • Reply to

    Nokia Co. (ADR) Company Profile

    by blimpsrus2001 3 hours ago

    Correct me if I do not understand. Your post states that out of 36 ratings 100% do not have a strong buy on NOK. Sounds like a lot of upgrading will be taking place!

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • corneliusflake@rocketmail.com corneliusflake 2 hours 47 minutes ago Flag

    and i heard 70% on the nightly business report day before yesterday. but that is for the year, not for the summer vacation period.

    they saw it as meaning that, in general, indexes were the better place to invest compared to managed funds.

  • I still don't get it, what's wrong with preserving cash and using it for worthy strategic acquisitions of assets producing sustainable revenues and profits and bringing new technologies, products and or IPs. This way improving fundamentals assuring more steady, continuous growth.
    One year costly buyout operation producing 6% increase can easily be wiped out during 1 or 2 bad trading sessions not to mention correction, economic and/or industry slowdown.
    Perhaps some reasonable mix of these two strategies, applying right proportions between them, is the answer.

  • Ratings Breakdown: 3 Sell Rating(s), 17 Hold Rating(s), 16 Buy Rating(s)
    Consensus Rating: Hold (Score: 2.36)
    Consensus Price Target: $12.46 (48.81% upside)

  • The delisting from the Euro Stoxx 50 was announced on March 1, 2013 (PPS was $3.68), on the day of the delisting (March 18) PPS was 3.33

    Nokia was also delisted from Stoxx Europe 50 in Sep 19, 2011. On the announcement day (Aug 31, 2011) PPS was $6.34, on the delisting day (Sep 19, 2011) PPS was $5.24. Then on Oct 24, 2011 it went back up to $7.11 because Nokia had an excellent 3Q

    So Nokia need to also be relisted on the Stoxx Europe 50 index. Hope it's coming soon

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Let's run to 9 in sept, and 10 in oct............nok20.

  • Nokia has made a complete 360 degree turn. Those previous Euro Stoxx investors that were long back before 2013 are going to love the new Nokia. More good news.

  • Prudential (PRU LN) and BT (BT/A LN) to replace Tesco (TSCO LN) and Ericsson (ERICB SS) in Stoxx Europe 50

  • I heard on CNBC a short statement to the effect that 80% of fund managers have not matched their benchmark, so as they return from their August holiday and look at the next 4 months, they'll be looking very hard for investments where they can make up some shortfall. (Where they got his 80% figure I did not hear - I would be interested to know the source).

    It's possible at least a few of these fund managers may see Nokia as undervalued. Possible catalysts that could make Nokia attractive to them include: a good earnings report in Oct, new HERE announcements/expansion, large NSN contract(s) announcement, an impressive tech innovation from NSN, introduction of a consumer product that might sell well, a patent/license agreement/settlement. I'm open to suggestions on additional possible catalysts.

    If we see one of these catalysts that is decent size/impact, that could start Nokia on PE expansion and put Nokia in the "momentum buy" category.

    Or, we may not see any of those catalysts, or any other possible actions I didn't list, and the share price will continue in an unsatisfying trading range....

  • I don't need to check I was there. The price went down because of delisting from Euro Stoxx because those investors had to sell, they had no choice. And good chance those same investors buy back. Your wrong if you don't believe price went down because of delisting, I can't remember exactly how much but it went down and it doesn't matter what you say because I know were it will go once it's reinstated back onto the Euro Stoxx 50.

NOK
8.37+0.24(+2.95%)Aug 29 4:01 PMEDT

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