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Nokia Corporation Message Board

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  • you have no clue

  • Reply to

    Oracle vs Google: Big Boss vs Small Boss

    by osmosisjosh May 19, 2016 2:27 PM

    ".... It was Sun that spent the R&D dollars to refine the objected-oriented programming concepts of academia into a commercial product ..."

    Absolutely, but the innovation is for the most part public domain, with a decades-long history in public domain research.

    This is a timeline of programming languages.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_programming_languages

    Among them you can find Smalltalk, whose own history goes back into the early 1970's. Smalltalk is the first _object-oriented_ programming language used in large-scale projects. Smalltalk is a major milestone in the evolution toward Java. Sure, Java is NOT Smalltalk. There are fundamental differences in Java's API syntax and mechanism, notably Java's interfaces, which are more like C++ headers (but again not the same). Yet most of Java's API "design" is "borrowed" and translated from Smalltalk and other such languages. ET++ was one of the first C++ application frameworks, which included lots of collection classes similar to those provided by Java, but obviously written in a different language with different syntax. The team of James Gosling at Sun did not steal this design. Gosling used public domain knowledge and put it all together into a world-class product.

    Kyle Brown says the following on why Java won over Smalltalk. Brown is a well-known researcher on program languages and design patterns.

    "... So, why didn't Smalltalk win? Because in the marketplace the best solutions don't always get picked. It's the Dvorak vs. QWERTY effect, or the Beta vs. VHS effect. Java had Sun's massive marketing muscle behind it. It was the first language demoed in a browser, so it forever had the internet "shine" attached to it. The JavaBandwagon is a real phenomenon. Some jump on without knowing where's its going because it's flashy and hip, some leave their old, worn-out horses for a better, faster ride, and some sadly leave behind their first loves because it's quickly becoming the only show in town. ..."

  • http://finance.yahoo.com/news/network-virtualization-impacting-t-capital-130826182.html

  • ZH: China Furious After US Launches Trade War "Nuke" With 522% Duty

    " ... Now that China's brief infatuation with "rationalizing" excess capacity in its massively glutted (and insolvent) steel sector is over after lasting all of 2-3 months, China is back to doing what it did in late 2015 (and what it has always done) when as we reported, a surge in Chinese exports led to the first salvos in the trade war between China - the world's biggest exporter of various steel products and is responsible for half the entire world's steel output - and countries who are importing dumped Chinese products at the expense of their own steel and mining industries...."

    " ... Washington was responding to a 2015 complaint by five steel producers that said they have been forced to lay off thousands of employees due to unfair foreign competition. One of the producers, United States Steel Corp., filed a separate complaint last month accusing the biggest Chinese steel producers of conspiring to fix prices, stealing trade secrets and skirting duties on imports in the U.S. with false labeling.

    Life for China's exporters is only going to get more difficult: the European Union launched its own investigation of Chinese steel exports last week following protests by steelworkers. In Britain, Tata Steel cited low-cost Chinese competition when it announced plans last month to sell money-losing operations that employ 20,000 people.

    And just to assure that this is nowhere near the end of the ongoing trade wars, China pushed back against its trading partners in April, announcing anti-dumping duties on steel from the European Union, Japan and South Korea ... "

  • What do you have against Juews? The one God we know today spoke to the Juews first ... and he will likely speak to them last. What if they get the last word on people like you? lol

  • Reply to

    Oracle vs Google: Competing versions of reality

    by osmosisjosh May 19, 2016 3:38 PM

    Ars Technica: " ... Screven [Oracle's chief corporate architect] was asked about Apache Harmony, the open source product that Google relied on heavily in building Android. He saw a big difference between that project and Android.

    Harmony was operating under a spec [specification] license," Screven said. "In order for apache to deliver an independent implementation of Java, they would have to have a TCK license and pass the TCK test," he said, referring to a compatibility test.

    "Are you aware of any unlicensed uses of Apache Harmony in the world today?" asked Oracle's lawyer.

    "Only one," said Screven. "Only Android ..."

  • Reply to

    Oracle vs Google: Competing versions of reality

    by osmosisjosh May 19, 2016 3:38 PM

    Ars Technica" .... Next up was Mark Reinhold, Oracle's chief architect for Java SE, who worked at Sun before the acquisition. Reinhold compared Google's copying of declaring code to using key parts of a Harry Potter book.

    "It's like using the titles of the books, the headings of each chapter, and the title sentences of each paragraph," said Reinhold, as well as "the connections between the characters."

    "Three books later, there are all these deep connections," he continued. "It's intensely creative. Like writing a book, you have to keep a lot of stuff in your head, and the end result is rich and complex. A lot of it is about figuring out what structures you want."

    During opening statements, Google's lawyer had compared the declaring code in question to labels on a filing cabinet. Asked if he thought it was accurate to describe Java APIs as labels, Reinhold said that would be "laughably simplistic ... "

  • Reply to

    Oracle vs Google: Big Boss vs Small Boss

    by osmosisjosh May 19, 2016 2:27 PM

    Can you source this for me? It was Sun that trademarked the Java brand. It was Sun that spent the R&D dollars to refine the objected-oriented programming concepts of academia into a commercial product with more than 9 million programmers.

    " ... The Java interface files have their design origins not within Oracle, and not within Sun. They came into being out of Academia in a decades-long move toward object-oriented programming .. "

    Again, that headline $9B number includes actual damages of less than $500 million AND disgorgement of potential profits up to $8.5 billion.

  • Larry Page: "It was established industry practice that the API and just the headers of those things could be taken and re-implemented ... "

    Oracle JMOL: " ... Google claimed in its proffer that Simon Phipps would show that “it was an industry custom or practice to use declarations/SSOs without a license.” Despite the fact that he was not properly disclosed, the Court allowed Phipps to testify so long as Oracle could conduct a two hour deposition. That deposition revealed that Phipps had no knowledge of any such industry practice. Rather, Phipps confirmed that “during the time period that [he was] at Sun, Sun made the Java APIs, including the declaring code and SSO, available for use by others pursuant to …[the] specification license and other arrangements.” At trial, Phipps could not identify “any entity in the 2005 to 2007 time frame who used the Java APIs in a commercial product without taking a license from Sun.” Google’s “custom” is at best made up of a single rogue actor—Apache Harmony—whose copying led to a major public dispute with Sun. One example of an organization seeking to obtain a license pursuant to the Java specification license and then retiring its project after having failed to obtain a license does not make a custom of unlicensed copying. Hence, Harmony is a poor example of unlicensed copying ... "

    ArsTechnica: Harmony's Mazzocchi:

    " ... But what I was missing is the fact that the copyright on the API is real and hard to ignore. Simply by implementing a class with the same signature of another, in another namespace and simply by looking at available javadocs could be considered copyright infringement, even if the implementation is clean room.

    So, we are, in fact, infringing on the spec lead copyright if we distribute something that has not passed the TCK and *we know that*.

    "The bigger question in my mind is not about hardware," Mazzocchi wrote. "What is Oracle's going to do with 500 million java-powered [sic] cell phones? What is Oracle going to do about Android's ripping off some of (now) their IP and getting away with it?"

  • Reply to

    Oracle vs Google: Big Boss vs Small Boss

    by osmosisjosh May 19, 2016 2:27 PM

    Absolutely, Dr. Bloch is right when he explains "how much creativity goes into designing an API", and this is also the exact point why Oracle will fall flat on their nose with that Java patent trolling nonsense. The Java interface files have their design origins not within Oracle, and not within Sun. They came into being out of Academia in a decades-long move toward object-oriented programming. $9 Billion .... Jesus ...... $9 Million seems more appropriate to me.

  • Traditionally, at least as per the last year or so, the low-$5's is cheap for Nokia. It's a different company now than a year ago so looking further back is pointless. So on a TRADING BASIS, Nokia looks cheap. Would I marry my position? No. But buying for a trade, if you're willing to hold onto it for six months, could easily net you 20%. It only has to get to the low $6's for that to happen, and we've seen it happen time and time again.

  • The only thing Nokia is doing is licensing their brand for phones. Nokia is not designing, not manufacturing, and most importantly not spending a penny on the deal. Worst case for Nokia is they don't make anything on it. And since it will not have cost them anything...

  • ArsTechnica - Larry Page: "For me, declaring code is not code,"

    Oracle JMOL - " ...Google’s own witness Joshua Bloch said it best: The reason that “some APIs are harder to write than others” is “because of the complexity of figuring out how best to express what it is that the programmer wants done.” Dr. Bloch went on to explain just how much creativity goes into designing an API. In his words: “API design is a noble and rewarding craft.” He called API design “an art, not a science.” He advised to “strive for beauty.” And the declaring code specifically is the valued component of the Java API packages: “The whole beauty of APIs” is that “you don’t have to touch the method declaration.” That is why he tells API developers to begin designing the API “before you’ve implemented the API.” In fact, “implementation should not impact APIs” at all ... It is the declaring code AND the structure, sequence, and organization of the packages that is creative ... "

  • Nine sounds reasonable. Good call.

  • Reply to

    Nokia brand mobile device is coming back....

    by allenhuang72 May 18, 2016 6:07 AM

    It looks like 2016 will be the year of Nokia. Fans of the Finnish company who never stopped hoping for Nokia's comeback in the smartphone business will be pleased to know that three new Android handsets might be launched this year.
    Also, according to NPU, the Finnish company is actively working on no less than *three* Android smartphones that will be launched sometime this year.

    via softpedia

  • Reply to

    Nokia brand mobile device is coming back....

    by allenhuang72 May 18, 2016 6:07 AM

    Should have been: $200M in revenue for every 10 million feature phone units they sell plus $500M in revenue for every 5 million smartphone units they sell.

  • Reply to

    Nokia brand mobile device is coming back....

    by allenhuang72 May 18, 2016 6:07 AM

    Ha! You're probably too legit to quit..... happy endings!

    Asia is likely where HMD will get the most bang for their buck in terms of gaining market share, particularly China and India, the 2 biggest markets for feature phones and smartphones.

    China is the maturing market dominated by the forked Android mobile os (AOSP + chinese apps/services). China has shown that the right products at the right price points can get a vendor from 0 to 50+ million units just like that.

    India is the smaller market which has more room to grow The total smartphone market in India in 1Q2016 was less than 25 million units. It is dominated by Android (AOSP + GMS), but the fastest growing mobile os is an optimized version of Android called Indus OS which supports 12 native Indian languages and which comes with its own Apps Bazaar. It went from 0 to 1.4 million units in less than a year and they expect to get to 100 million units by 2018.

    If you play with the numbers and assume feature phone ASP of around $20 and smartphone ASP of around $100 then you can sort of discern the speed and various paths HMD can take to the various revenue milestones, depending on how much cash they want to burn: $200M in revenue for every 10 million feature phone units they sell plus $500M in revenue for every 10 million smartphone units they sell.

    This should be fun to watch.

  • Reply to

    Nokia brand mobile device is coming back....

    by allenhuang72 May 18, 2016 6:07 AM

    Naw, ex-Nokia engineers plus ex-Nokia managers at HMD will design and engineer the phones and tablets. Nokia will have no equity in HMD but will get a board seat and have a say in brand management.

    From the press release:

    " ... Nokia Technologies will take a seat on the Board of Directors of HMD and set mandatory brand requirements and performance related provisions to ensure that all Nokia-branded products exemplify consumer expectations of Nokia devices, including quality, design and consumer focused innovation ... "

  • LONDON (S&P Global Ratings) May 19, 2016--S&P Global Ratings today said it has
    affirmed its 'BB+' long-term corporate credit rating on Finnish technology
    company Nokia Corp. We also affirmed our 'BB+' long-term corporate credit
    ratings on Nokia's core subsidiaries, Alcatel-Lucent S.A. and Alcatel-Lucent
    USA Inc. The outlook is positive.

    At the same time, we affirmed the 'BB+' issue rating on Nokia's senior
    unsecured debt. We raised our recovery rating to '3' from '4', indicating our
    expectation of meaningful recovery in the higher half of the 50%-70% range in
    the event of a payment default.

    We also affirmed our issue ratings on the debt issued by Alcatel-Lucent S.A.
    and Alcatel-Lucent USA Inc. at 'BB+'. The recovery rating on this debt remains
    unchanged at '3', indicating our expectation of meaningful recovery in the
    higher half of the 50%-70% range in the event of a payment default.

    We also raised the short-term rating on Nokia Corp. and Alcatel-Lucent S.A. to
    'A-3' from 'B'. This is to correct an error where we had previously
    incorrectly maintained our 'B' short-term ratings for both entities which
    should have been raised to 'A-3'.

  • How dumb are you? I bet you are in awe of morons!!!

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