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AT&T, Inc. Message Board

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  • With Varizon up 61 cents today we should be up double that tomorrow. IMO

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    All kinds of obstacles for gfast

    by tvs1400 9 hours ago

    I realize this. Bundlers will be plentiful with adequate bandwidth and makes margins LEAN.

  • Reply to

    All kinds of obstacles for gfast

    by tvs1400 9 hours ago

    Millions of people WILL want a la carte, millions won't. That's just a fact. It's not all or nothing.

  • Reply to

    All kinds of obstacles for gfast

    by tvs1400 9 hours ago

    Point is the technology has been PROVEN on real world "aged" copper with VERY good results. This tech brings IPTV capability at 20% of the cost of full fiber.

    Who cares? Existing pay TV bundlers who currently have a choke hold on the delivery pipes of cable and satellite. Enter bandwidth 100 mbps or greater to the consumer along with net neutrality by FCC (or FTC enforced fair playing field) and you end up with possibly endless number of bundlers and direct content ala carte from content producers. Until you breach the 30 mbps for each TV in the home there is no market for IPTV to that home. NOW, who cares? AT&T shareholders who have their leader buying a pay TV satellite company at growth multiples just before their market moat evaporates with bandwidth expansion. If two little players in the mobile market can wreak such havoc on the two bigs, what do you think dozens of TV bundlers over IP will do to existing bundlers' revenues/profits?

  • I actually agree with you My_eyez. Much of the copper still in good shape. G.fast can be utilized until the point the copper is beyond repair and full fiber strung on an as needed basis as lines actually break. Makes for a much easier capital outlay than full fiber.

  • VOD is partnering WITH the power company in Ireland to run a new fiber network. The U.S. telecoms successfully lobbied politicians to block power companies such as Chattanooga's from expanding their fiber networks. Some blocked from deploying altogether. FCC recently throwing out the gauntlet on these restriction laws obtained with lobby dollars.

  • Reply to

    All kinds of obstacles for gfast

    by tvs1400 9 hours ago

    That's one man's opinion in Austria bro. Who cares?

  • The cabling in the U.K. is decades old to by BT had a VERY positive set of results on that old copper.

  • Reply to

    All kinds of obstacles for gfast

    by tvs1400 9 hours ago

    "The speed the technology offers will meet the needs of even the most demanding households over the next 10 to 20 years, it said."

    At 20% of the cost of full fiber.

  • Reply to

    All kinds of obstacles for gfast

    by tvs1400 9 hours ago

    Those are the easiest and juicy targets to readily convert so they will be the first. You run one fiber line into the basement and hook on dozens of customers in one whack.

    Back_bay, DSL pounded the old dial up. It was a great step forward from the existing speeds same as G.fast is a huge step forward from DSL. Fiber like speeds at 20% of the cost is a capex game changer. You guys can't seem to comprehend the cost savings for that kind of bandwidth is the game changer. Ask AOL how the transition from dial up to DSL impacted their business.....same response you will have for pay TV bundlers as G.fast provides more than ample bandwidth for 4k TV ON DEMAND.

  • Reply to

    All kinds of obstacles for gfast

    by tvs1400 9 hours ago

    You really don't bother to read my posts? I posted the same exact thing but you left out some data.

    "During the G.fast trials, downstream speeds of around 800Mbps were achieved over a 19-metre length of copper, combined with upstream speeds of more than 200Mbps," BT said in a statement at the time. "Impressive speeds of around 700/200Mbps were also achieved over longer lines of 66 metres, a distance that encompasses around 80 percent of typical connections." ~ITU approves G.fast DSL high-speed broadband standard December 8, 2014

    Should note BT is U.K. based. 66 meters for 900 mbps asymmetrical is HUGE (compared to 10 mbps or less for your typical DSL connection in the U.S.) and you can see BT ran it at 200 mbps upstream meaning multiple, simultaneous video calls/conferencing can be conducted. 66 meters=216 ft or 72 yards of last leg copper can be used. Depending on your typical U.S. residential suburb you can range from less than 100m to 200m with the VAST majority under 120m (do some research if you don't believe me). Stab a node in the middle of the residential block (alley way) and you have every house on the block within the 66 meters tested by BT in the U.K. and a gargantuan leap from 10 mpbs DSL to 900 mbps. All one needs for live streaming sports to be lag free is 30 mbps while some would argue 15-18 mbps. Average U.S. household is 2.5 TV sets meaning anything 100 mbps or greater is more than ample to stream TV. So, even if it is a 200m residential block, G.fast speed loss due to distance will still hit 600 mbps for those at the end of the block if you plunk down a node in the middle of the block. For #@# sake, 400 meters still delivers 95 mbps. A quarter of a mile=95mbps!.... {add} A telecom could conceivably deploy just nine nodes in a mileXmile grid to jump from less than 10 mbps to 100 mbps.

  • T bought BLS for Cingular "Wireless" alone! BLS said, "No, you have to buy the copper, too!" which T didn't want. So I don't think T has any interest in copper other than getting away from it. Personally, I think in the future all wired internet will run over the power co's wires, after all they go to everybody's house! Plus, those #$%$ wires can cary a LOT of signal! Oh, wireless for mobiles but the power co. for every thing else. JMO!

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    All kinds of obstacles for gfast

    by tvs1400 9 hours ago

    That's why gfast is being rolled out in Freaking apartment buildings in Austria, LOL. Great place to test it out and phase it out when it comes up Khrrap.

  • Reply to

    All kinds of obstacles for gfast

    by tvs1400 9 hours ago

    Anything "fast" over copper will never live up to expectations. G.Fast will turn out to be a loser just like DSL was. Fiber lines is the only way to go.

  • All I can guess is that you are many decades old and take offense to when I said "decades old".

  • ONLY at previous breaks or exposures BUDDY :-)
    You post like smalls ... (key word) ... "COULD" .....

  • Means they could be in poor condition, buddy. Means lots of people won't be interested in digging stuff up to find out.

  • Reply to

    All kinds of obstacles for gfast

    by tvs1400 9 hours ago

    The speed increase is needed for applications such as streaming 4K video (and in the future 8K video), IPTV, cloud-based storage, and communication via HD video, ITU said.

    One of G.fast's biggest proponents is telecom operator Telekom Austria, which in October said it had connected the world's first subscriber to such a service to its domestic network. The speed the technology offers will meet the needs of even the most demanding households over the next 10 to 20 years, it said.

    Telekom Austria has apartment buildings in cities in mind for large-scale commercial installations in 2016. In this case fiber is deployed all the way to the basement of a building, and existing copper lines are used for the final connection to the apartments. The speed combined with the distance limitations means G.fast depends on operators to roll out fiber almost all the way to homes or offices.

    ITU expects the first rollouts to come before the end of next year. The technology will also be used to connect mobile base stations, Wi-Fi hotspots and small and medium sized companies, it said.

    G.fast increases the bandwidth by using more spectrum. That places extra demands on equipment to be very good at handling interference, a far from trivial requirement.

    Getting it to work has been a challenge for chipset manufacturers and equipment vendors. The standardization of G.fast started in 2011, and was meant to be finished by April. In the end, another seven months were needed, showing once again that standardization is a tricky business.

  • Gigabit speeds over telephone wires? Yes, thanks to new G.fast standard

    G.fast offers speeds of up to 1Gbps over copper -- but only for those within 100m of their operator's fiber network
    By Mikael Ricknäs
    IDG News Service | Dec 8, 2014 5:17 AM PT
    A technology that lets copper telephone wires compete with fiber has finally been standardized, opening the way for affordable, interoperable equipment running at up to 1Gbps.

    The technology that gives copper broadband a new lease on life is called G.fast. It offers speeds at up to 1Gbps at distances of up to 100 meters. As the distance increases, the speeds decreases to about 150Mbps over 250 meters, according to the International Telecommunication Union, which has developed the underlying standard and announced G.fast's approval on Friday.

    What performance users end up with depends on a number of factors, including the distance and the quality of the copper wires. The speeds quoted by ITU are just targets, which is far from the same thing as guaranteed performance.

    However, tests conducted in the last two years have shown G.fast is capable of impressive speeds. For example, earlier this year British network operator BT said download speeds of around 700Mbps and upload speeds at 200Mbps over a distance of 66 meters were achieved during a field trial. G.fast gives operators some flexibility to decide the split between upload and download bandwidths.

  • Just because copper cables are old has nothing to do with "condition"

T
33.51+0.84(+2.57%)Dec 18 4:00 PMEST

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