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Advanced Cell Technology Inc. Message Board

  • elk_1l elk_1l Sep 19, 2013 5:31 PM Flag

    OT: HOW THE U.S. NARROWLY AVOIDED A NUCLEAR HOLOCAUST 33 YEARS AGO, AND STILL RISKS CATASTROPHE TODAY

    WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 | Democracy Now

    Thirty-three years ago to the day, the United States narrowly missed a nuclear holocaust on its soil. The so-called "Damascus Accident" involved a Titan II intercontinental ballistic missile mishap at a launch complex outside Damascus, Arkansas. During a routine maintenance procedure, a young worker accidentally dropped a nine-pound tool in the silo, piercing the missile’s skin and causing a major leak of flammable rocket fuel. Sitting on top of that Titan 2 was the most powerful thermonuclear warhead ever deployed on an American missile. The weapon was about 600 times more powerful than the bomb that destroyed Hiroshima. For the next nine hours, a group of airmen put themselves at grave risk to save the missile and prevent a massive explosion that would’ve caused incalculable damage. The story is detailed in Eric Schlosser’s new book, "Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety," which explores how often the United States has come within a hair’s breadth of a domestic nuclear detonation or an accidental war. Drawing on thousands of pages of recently declassified government documents and interviews with scores of military personnel and nuclear scientists, Schlosser shows that America’s nuclear weapons pose a grave risk to humankind.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

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    • Wow....

    • ................"America's nuclear weapons pose a grave risk to humankind.............."

      Elk, interesting article. It seems the writer is pointing at America's nuclear weapons as a danger to mankind when there are many nations now with nuclear weapons. I found that curious especially with the past Cherenoble incident. (Can't spell that Russian word.)

      • 1 Reply to dickw3939
      • dickw, I didn't see it as an anti-US article. The point I took away from the article is that although we probably take better care of and follow better safety procedures than almost every other country with nuclear weapons (of which there now are many), we still have had several close calls and have to have continuing concerns about even our own arsenal. It then makes it even much worse that other countries have probably had many more close calls with weapons (aside from energy plant disasters like Chernobyl and Fukushima) than we have and the dangers in those countries also continue on at that higher level. At any rate, any way we want to cut it, it's not good.

        Sentiment: Strong Buy

    • Atom Bomb Almost Exploded Over North Carolina In 1961, The Guardian Reports
      Reuters | Posted: 09/20/2013 7:06 pm EDT | Updated: 09/21/2013 10:09 am EDT

      LONDON, Sept 20 (Reuters) - A U.S. atom bomb nearly exploded in 1961 over North Carolina that would have been 260 times more powerful than the device that devastated Hiroshima, according to a declassified document published in a British newspaper on Friday.

      The Guardian newspaper said the document, obtained by investigative journalist Eric Schlosser under the Freedom of Information Act, gave the first conclusive evidence that the United States came close to a disaster in January 1961.

      The incident happened when two Mark 39 hydrogen bombs were accidentally dropped over Goldsboro, North Carolina, after a B-52 bomber broke up in midair.

      There has been persistent speculation about how serious the incident was and the U.S. government has repeatedly denied its nuclear arsenal put Americans' lives at risk through safety flaws, the newspaper said.

      But the newly published document said one of the two bombs behaved exactly in the manner of a nuclear weapon in wartime, with its parachute opening and its trigger mechanisms engaged. Only one low-voltage switch prevented a cataclysm.

      Fallout could have spread over Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia and even New York City, the paper said, threatening the lives of millions of people.

      In the document, Parker Jones, a senior engineer in the Sandia National Laboratories responsible for the mechanical safety of nuclear weapons, concluded that "one simple, dynamo-technology, low-voltage switch stood between the United States and a major catastrophe."

      Jones' report, titled "Goldsboro Revisited or: How I Learned to Mistrust the H-Bomb," was written eight years after the accident in which one hydrogen bomb fell into a field near Faro, North Carolina, and the other into a meadow.

      He found that three of four safety mechanisms designed to prevent unintended detonation failed to operate properly in the Faro bomb.

      When the bomb hit the ground, a firing signal was sent to the nuclear core of the device and it was only the final, highly vulnerable switch that averted a disaster.

      "The MK 39 Mod 2 bomb did not possess adequate safety for the airborne alert role in the B-52," Jones concluded.

      The Guardian said the document was found by Schlosser as he was researching a new book on the nuclear arms race, "Command and Control." (Reporting by Belinda Goldsmith; Editing by Xavier Briand)

      Sentiment: Strong Buy

    • So recently it was reported that Cuba now has Russian missiles. I guess our government does not see this as the threat the Kennedy administration did.

      Sentiment: Buy

    • Geez Elk. The freakin missile wasn't armed. Good news is nothing happend. What's your point?

      • 1 Reply to theresnobeachhere
      • Re: "Geez Elk. The freakin missile wasn't armed. Good news is nothing happend. What's your point?"

        Right, nobeach, thanks again, you have made it absolutely clear there is no doubt that we can all be sure there was no danger at all.

        "…During a routine maintenance procedure, a young worker accidentally dropped a nine-pound tool in the silo, piercing the missile’s skin and causing a major leak of flammable rocket fuel. Sitting on top of that Titan 2 was the most powerful thermonuclear warhead ever deployed on an American missile. The weapon was about 600 times more powerful than the bomb that destroyed Hiroshima. For the next nine hours, a group of airmen put themselves at grave risk to save the missile and prevent a massive explosion that would’ve caused incalculable damage. …"

        Sentiment: Strong Buy

    • elk, green, ace -

      Of all the topics/content you should not discuss here, or any open source forum, is the topic/content you discuss here. Most seriously! Really.

      Cheers,

    • I wonder what is said about the 1983 incident in western Nebraska when a maintenance team working on a mimuteman III accidentally armed and initiated launch countdown of the ICBM. I was on duty back at Cheyene but a friend of mine said that wing security told his fire team to park a 5 ton peace keeper truck on the 100 ton blast door and shoot the 100 foot long rocket down with rifles if it should embark on a trip to our Soviet friends. Fortunately, the sequence petered out after the guys on site ripped out enough drawers of 23 year old vacume tube control circuits. As a young man I had an adventurous time, now I just loose money and read entertaining message boards.

    • thanks for the history lesson LMAO

 
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