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Advanced Cell Technology Inc. Message Board

  • craigsswanndo craigsswanndo Sep 19, 2013 7:58 PM Flag

    O/T- A Women's Right To Choose

    And I support that right because it falls on the women and her doctor and her God,, but, some states are trying to require women to first have an ultrasound to see the baby they are about to murder,, and some women after having seen there baby alive in the womb are having second thoughts and sparring that life,, to bad that has not happened all along as it could have saved millions of lives in the past,,
    This should prove to get some speaks from the board,,
    C

    Sentiment: Hold

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    • Doc, are you a woman? If not then #$%$, because this about a womans rights, not about what some puffed up old self righteous man wants. How having the man castrated that got her pregnant in the first place? Maybe castrated is a little strong, as a vasectomy would do just fine too.

    • OH here we go again, words from one of those right to life fools--you know the kind, where life begins at conception and ENDS AT BIRTH. The war mongers who claim to care about life but want everyone to carry murderous guns. Hey, where the hell are you losers when people are getting killed on the highways because of losers who are texting? You aholes talk out of both sides of your mouths. When you all whined about right to fetus', did you say NO to Bushs war of lies? You fakes can't wait to throttle someone on death row, that's a LIFE isn't it? Woman CAN and WILL continue to have the right to have an abortion regardless of what you backwoods Neanderthals try to beat into their heads. What losers. Don't you get it, your party is LOSING and keeps LOSING as you double down on idiocy.

    • GOP’S SECRET ANTI-CHOICE PLOT: THE SHADY CRACKDOWN ON TRAINING ABORTION DOCTORS

      Draconian laws to bar abortions are well known. But now there's a quiet scheme to limit what medical students learn

      KATIE MCDONOUGH | THURSDAY, SEP 19, 2013 | Salon

      AS TERRIBLE AS THE LAST FEW YEARS HAVE BEEN FOR REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS IN THE UNITED STATES, GROWING EXTREMISM AMONG ANTIABORTION POLITICIANS HAS RESULTED IN UNPRECEDENTED AWARENESS OF THESE ISSUES AND A GROUNDSWELL OF PUBLIC SUPPORT FOR ABORTION RIGHTS. Wendy Davis’ marathon filibuster, bolstered by her Democratic colleagues and the thousands of Texans who showed up at the Capitol day after day, turned the state’s sweeping new abortion law and Gov. Rick Perry into national symbols for the right’s fixation on policing women’s bodies. The same could be said of Mississippi, Arkansas, North Dakota and elsewhere in the country. As a result of these battles, we now know the names, faces and strategies behind the American antiabortion movement, and that knowledge is a powerful thing.

      But there is another threat to women’s access to abortion happening right now, and it is largely missing from how we talk about the war on reproductive rights: The number of doctors who perform abortions in this country has been steadily declining for decades, and medical schools aren’t training enough students to replace them.

      “There are a lot of reasons why reproductive healthcare is not well covered in medical school curricula,” Lois Backus, executive director of Medical Students for Choice, tells Salon. “But among the most serious causes is the fact that reproductive health topics are still a source of controversy. Even though abortion is the second most common procedure experienced by women of childbearing age, it is routinely ignored in medical education.”

      According to data from the National Abortion Federation, NEARLY 70 PERCENT OF MEDICAL STUDENTS IN THE UNITED STATES HAVE RECEIVED LESS THAN 30 MINUTES OF CLASS TRAINING ABOUT ABORTION BY THE TIME THEY FINISH MEDICAL SCHOOL. THIS DISREGARD FOR REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH EDUCATION IS AN EXPERIENCE DR. NANCY STANWOOD, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND SECTION CHIEF OF FAMILY PLANNING AT THE YALE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND BOARD CHAIR OF PHYSICIANS FOR REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH, REMEMBERS WELL. “WE SPENT LITERALLY AN HOUR AND A HALF LEARNING ABOUT BIRTH CONTROL IN TWO YEARS OF LECTURES,” SHE SAYS. “WE SPENT MORE TIME ON COCHLEAR IMPLANTS — AN IMPORTANT, BUT FAR LESS COMMON, PROCEDURE.”

      THE PROBLEM WITH THIS KIND OF UNEVEN TRAINING IS THAT A LACK OF EARLY EXPOSURE TO REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH ISSUES NOT ONLY HURTS A STUDENT’S ABILITY TO BECOME, AS STANWOOD NOTES, “INFORMED PHYSICIAN CITIZENS,” IT ALSO SHAPES THEIR CAREER CHOICES. IT’S FAR LESS LIKELY FOR STUDENTS TO CHOOSE A SPECIALIZATION IN REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH CARE IF IT’S NOT SOMETHING THEY’RE HEARING ABOUT DURING THEIR TRAINING.

      Social stigma around abortion may drive the marginalization of this training in medical school curricula, but the scarcity of students being trained to perform the procedure is also directly connected to the proliferation of GOP-backed state-level restrictions — on funding, on clinics and on physicians themselves.

      New regulations mandated under Texas’ omnibus antiabortion law threaten to shutter all but five of the remaining abortion service providers in the second most populous state in the country. Mississippi is still engaged in a legal battle to keep its last remaining abortion clinic open; the same goes for North Dakota. Nationwide, close to 90 percent of American counties lack an abortion provider, leaving millions of women without meaningful access to reproductive healthcare.

      But for a medical student, the absence of providers can also mean the absence of teachers.

      In Ohio earlier this year, the University of Toledo Medical Center, bowing to pressure from state Republicans and Ohio Right to Life, refused to renew its transfer agreement with two area clinics, the Center for Choice and Capital Care Network. Both clinics closed only months later, leaving women like Carolyn Payne, a medical student at the University of Toledo, and 15 of her colleagues, without anyone to teach them how to perform abortions. As Payne told the Chronicle of Higher Education, she now has to travel an hour outside the city to learn this basic medical procedure.

      In Kansas, after a measure attempting to ban public hospitals from providing any and all abortion training failed, the Republican-controlled Legislature passed a slightly modified, though similarly restrictive, version of the bill requiring public hospitals to use private dollars to fund medical residents’ abortion training. Gov. Sam Brownback signed it, along with dozens of other sweeping abortion restrictions, in April. These kinds of barriers leave training available in the most limited of terms, but make it far from accessible.

      IT’S A NATIONAL TREND WITH LONG-TERM CONSEQUENCES. AFTER ALL, WHAT DOES THE RIGHT TO AN ABORTION MEAN IF THERE ARE INCREASINGLY FEWER DOCTORS LEFT TO PERFORM THE PROCEDURE?

      BUT, FACED WITH GROWING BARRIERS TO COMPREHENSIVE TRAINING, MEDICAL STUDENTS ACROSS THE COUNTRY HAVE STARTED TO FIGHT BACK. “Students are hungry for this training,” Stanwood says. “We’re witnessing a really important generational shift. More and more medical students want to be equipped to meet these needs, and reform is beginning to happen because students are demanding it. Change is coming from the bottom up rather than the top down.”

      Progress has been particularly strong at the residency level. Training opportunities have proliferated in obstetrics-gynecology residency programs and family practice residency programs in large part because of funding from organizations like the Kenneth J. Ryan Residency Program, the continued advocacy of groups Medical Students for Choice and medical students themselves.

      BUT THERE IS STILL A LONG WAY TO GO. AND THE STAKES COULDN’T BE HIGHER. “THIS IS A VERY LONG-TERM FIGHT THAT WE’RE IN,” BACKUS SAYS. “THE MEDICAL WORLD IS VERY CONSERVATIVE AND RESISTANT TO CHANGE.” SHE ESTIMATES THAT WITH THE PROLIFERATION OF ANTIABORTION LEGISLATION, THIS COULD BE AS MUCH AS A 50-YEAR FIGHT. “BUT,” SHE ADDS, “WE PLAN TO STAY IN THERE.”

      Sentiment: Strong Buy

    • Re: "..I support that right because it falls on the women and her doctor and her God,, but, some states are trying to require women to first have an ultrasound to see the baby they are about to murder..."

      Again, craig, it is now clear that spontaneous early abortions account for by far the greatest number of abortions in all of human experience. Anyone believing in God does have to assume that, perhaps for reasons well beyond our own comprehension, this outcome has been built into human procreation by God, him or herself.

      And, thus, though it may be so for very sound reasons that do surpass our limited comprehension, we do have to admit that God is by far the most prolific abortionist known to us.

      We may not like that or fully understand it, but we do have to admit it is true. And, at the same time, your statement indicates that you think we should also label God as the most prolific murderer in all of human history. Please correct me if I am mistaken about what you are saying here.

      Sentiment: Strong Buy

      • 2 Replies to elk_1l
      • Elk,, now pay attention and I will try and explain this so even you can understand,, the energy of the spirit is alway ther and never dies,, if a baby is conceived and there is a problem with the interface ( for a lack of better terms) between the body and the spirit, due to an ABO in compatibility or genetic defect, then the body cannot continue, so the body is aborted and the spirit goes back to God only to wait for the next body that God would have it to inhabit,, and when you die, your mind is incorporated in your spirit that will go back to God just to live the next life,, and if you are a good boy then maybe you can finially go to heaven,,
        C

        Sentiment: Hold

      • elk, you can justify anything to defend your point, doesn't make it right. and it wont relieve you of responsibility.

    • C, think I see what you are saying and I respect your opinion. For myself, it is a sanctity of life issue. To any abortion avocate out there who believes in God I say ask yourself this question. Would Jesus approve of abortion? The answer is obvious.

      • 2 Replies to dickw3939
      • Re: "For myself, it is a sanctity of life issue. To any abortion avocate out there who believes in God I say ask yourself this question. Would Jesus approve of abortion? The answer is obvious."

        Another great point, dickw. To any RWNJ starvation advocates out there who believe in God I say ask yourself this question. Would Jesus approve of cutting food stamps to children and their single mothers, to the elderly, and to the disabled, including disabled Veterans? The answer is obvious.

        BTW, dickw, did you notice that Pope Francis is telling Catholics to stop obsessing so much about abortion, contraception and gays....and to move ahead to more important issues?

        Sentiment: Strong Buy

      • D,, I am a physician and an Osteopath, I was trained to respect the mind body and spirit,, life for me is always and never ends, hence the spirit which is always present even before life here,, if one is a true Christian, then life begins at conception, as God planted the seed in Mary and was life,,
        One of the subjects that gets me is that the progressives will #$%$ and moan about gun control and some poor souls that die at the hands of nuts, but, don't say a dam thing about the taking of a human life in the womb,,
        C

        Sentiment: Hold

    • What anti abortionists never discuss is how crowded this planet would be, if no abortions ever happened ! Yet, many complain of over crowding. IMO, abortions should be mandatory, for any woman in less than a desirable circumstance!

 
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