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  • lonesome_polecatt lonesome_polecatt Jan 5, 2014 4:33 PM Flag

    There is no global warming. Pt Barnum has fooled the left which is easy to do.

     

    Ice Cube

    To the horror of global warming alarmists, global cooling is here

    Peter Ferrara
    Forbes
    Sun, 26 May 2013 14:58 CDT

    Around 1250 A.D., historical records show, ice packs began showing up farther south in the North Atlantic. Glaciers also began expanding on Greenland, soon to threaten Norse settlements on the island. From 1275 to 1300 A.D., glaciers began expanding more broadly, according to radiocarbon dating of plants killed by the glacier growth. The period known today as the Little Ice Age was just starting to poke through.

    Summers began cooling in Northern Europe after 1300 A.D., negatively impacting growing seasons, as reflected in the Great Famine of 1315 to 1317. Expanding glaciers and ice cover spreading across Greenland began driving the Norse settlers out. The last, surviving, written records of the Norse Greenland settlements, which had persisted for centuries, concern a marriage in 1408 A.D. in the church of Hvalsey, today the best preserved Norse ruin.

    Colder winters began regularly freezing rivers and canals in Great Britain, the Netherlands and Northern France, with both the Thames in London and the Seine in Paris frozen solid annually. The first River Thames Frost Fair was held in 1607. In 1607-1608, early European settlers in North America reported ice persisting on Lake Superior until June. In January, 1658, a Swedish army marched across the ice to invade Copenhagen. By the end of the 17th century, famines had spread from northern France, across Norway and Sweden, to Finland and Estonia.

    Reflecting its global scope, evidence of the Little Ice Age appears in the Southern Hemisphere as well. Sediment cores from Lake Malawi in southern Africa show colder weather from 1570 to 1820. A 3,000 year temperature reconstruction based on varying rates of stalagmite growth in a cave in South Africa also indicates a colder period from 1500 to 1800. A 1997 study comparing West Antarctic ice cores with the results of the Greenland Ice Sheet Project Two (GISP2) indicate a global Little Ice Age affecting the two ice sheets in tandem.

    The Siple Dome, an ice dome roughly 100 km long and 100 km wide, about 100 km east of the Siple Coast of Antartica, also reflects effects of the Little Ice Age synchronously with the GISP2 record, as do sediment cores from the Bransfield Basin of the Antarctic Peninsula. Oxygen/isotope analysis from the Pacific Islands indicates a 1.5 degree Celsius temperature decline between 1270 and 1475 A.D.

    The Franz Josef glacier on the west side of the Southern Alps of New Zealand advanced sharply during the period of the Little Ice Age, actually invading a rain forest at its maximum extent in the early 1700s. The Mueller glacier on the east side of New Zealand's Southern Alps expanded to its maximum extent at roughly the same time.

    Ice cores from the Andeas mountains in South America show a colder period from 1600 to 1800. Tree ring data from Patagonia in South America show cold periods from 1270 to 1380 and from 1520 to 1670. Spanish explorers noted the expansion of the San Rafael Glacier in Chile from 1675 to 1766, which continued into the 19th century.

    The height of the Little Ice Age is generally dated as 1650 to 1850 A.D. The American Revolutionary Army under General George Washington shivered at Valley Forge in the winter of 1777-78, and New York harbor was frozen in the winter of 1780. Historic snowstorms struck Lisbon, Portugal in 1665, 1744 and 1886. Glaciers in Glacier National Park in Montana advanced until the late 18th or early 19th centuries. The last River Thames Frost Fair was held in 1814. The Little Ice Age phased out during the middle to late 19th century.

    The Little Ice Age, following the historically warm temperatures of the Medieval Warm Period, which lasted from about AD 950 to 1250, has been attributed to natural cycles in solar activity, particularly sunspots. A period of sharply lower sunspot activity known as the Wolf Minimum began in 1280 and persisted for 70 years until 1350. That was followed by a period of even lower sunspot activity that lasted 90 years from 1460 to 1550 known as the Sporer Minimum. During the period 1645 to 1715, the low point of the Little Ice Age, the number of sunspots declined to zero for the entire time. This is known as the Maunder Minimum, named after English astronomer Walter Maunder. That was followed by the Dalton Minimum from 1790 to 1830, another period of well below normal sunspot activity.

    Comment: Sunspot activity is correlated with the decrease in global temperatures, but isn't necessarily the cause. There was also an increase in cometary activity as the Medieval Warm Period turned into the Little Ice Age, as recorded in annals, tree-ring and ice core data. See Mike Baillie's New Light on the Black Death: The Cosmic Connection.

    The increase in global temperatures since the late 19th century just reflects the end of the Little Ice Age. The global temperature trends since then have followed not rising CO2 trends but the ocean temperature cycles of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). Every 20 to 30 years, the much colder water near the bottom of the oceans cycles up to the top, where it has a slight cooling effect on global temperatures until the sun warms that water. That warmed water then contributes to slightly warmer global temperatures, until the next churning cycle.

    Those ocean temperature cycles, and the continued recovery from the Little Ice Age, are primarily why global temperatures rose from 1915 until 1945, when CO2 emissions were much lower than in recent years. The change to a cold ocean temperature cycle, primarily the PDO, is the main reason that global temperatures declined from 1945 until the late 1970s, despite the soaring CO2 emissions during that time from the postwar industrialization spreading across the globe.

    The 20 to 30 year ocean temperature cycles turned back to warm from the late 1970s until the late 1990s, which is the primary reason that global temperatures warmed during this period. But that warming ended 15 years ago, and global temperatures have stopped increasing since then, if not actually cooled, even though global CO2 emissions have soared over this period. As The Economist magazine reported in March, "The world added roughly 100 billion tonnes of carbon to the atmosphere between 2000 and 2010. That is about a quarter of all the CO2 put there by humanity since 1750." Yet, still no warming during that time. That is because the CO2 greenhouse effect is weak and marginal compared to natural causes of global temperature changes.

    At first the current stall out of global warming was due to the ocean cycles turning back to cold. But something much more ominous has developed over this period. Sunspots run in 11 year short term cycles, with longer cyclical trends of 90 and even 200 years. The number of sunspots declined substantially in the last 11 year cycle, after flattening out over the previous 20 years. But in the current cycle, sunspot activity has collapsed. NASA's Science News report for January 8, 2013 states,
    "Indeed, the sun could be on the threshold of a mini-Maunder event right now. Ongoing Solar Cycle 24 [the current short term 11 year cycle] is the weakest in more than 50 years. Moreover, there is (controversial) evidence of a long-term weakening trend in the magnetic field strength of sunspots. Matt Penn and William Livingston of the National Solar Observatory predict that by the time Solar Cycle 25 arrives, magnetic fields on the sun will be so weak that few if any sunspots will be formed. Independent lines of research involving helioseismology and surface polar fields tend to support their conclusion."
    That is even more significant because NASA's climate science has been controlled for years by global warming hysteric James Hansen, who recently announced his retirement.

    But this same concern is increasingly being echoed worldwide. The Voice of Russia reported on April 22, 2013,
    "Global warming which has been the subject of so many discussions in recent years, may give way to global cooling. According to scientists from the Pulkovo Observatory in St.Petersburg, solar activity is waning, so the average yearly temperature will begin to decline as well. Scientists from Britain and the US chime in saying that forecasts for global cooling are far from groundless."
    That report quoted Yuri Nagovitsyn of the Pulkovo Observatory saying, "Evidently, solar activity is on the decrease. The 11-year cycle doesn't bring about considerable climate change - only 1-2%. The impact of the 200-year cycle is greater - up to 50%. In this respect, we could be in for a cooling period that lasts 200-250 years." In other words, another Little Ice Age.

    The German Herald reported on March 31, 2013,
    "German meteorologists say that the start of 2013 is now the coldest in 208 years - and now German media has quoted Russian scientist Dr Habibullo Abdussamatov from the St. Petersburg Pulkovo Astronomical Observatory [saying this] is proof as he said earlier that we are heading for a "Mini Ice Age." Talking to German media the scientist who first made his prediction in 2005 said that after studying sunspots and their relationship with climate change on Earth, we are now on an 'unavoidable advance towards a deep temperature drop.'"
    Faith in Global Warming is collapsing in formerly staunch Europe following increasingly severe winters which have now started continuing into spring. Christopher Booker explained in The Sunday Telegraph on April 27, 2013,
    "Here in Britain, where we had our fifth freezing winter in a row, the Central England Temperature record - according to an expert analysis on the US science blog Watts Up With That - shows that in this century, average winter temperatures have dropped by 1.45C, more than twice as much as their rise between 1850 and 1999, and twice as much as the entire net rise in global temperatures recorded in the 20th century."
    A news report from India (The Hindu April 22, 2013) stated, "March in Russia saw the harshest frosts in 50 years, with temperatures dropping to - 25° Celsius in central parts of the country and - 45° in the north. It was the coldest spring month in Moscow in half a century....Weathermen say spring is a full month behind schedule in Russia." The news report summarized,
    "Russia is famous for its biting frosts but this year, abnormally icy weather also hit much of Europe, the United States, China and India. Record snowfalls brought Kiev, capital of Ukraine, to a standstill for several days in late March, closed roads across many parts of Britain, buried thousands of sheep beneath six-metre deep snowdrifts in Northern Ireland, and left more than 1,000,000 homes without electricity in Poland. British authorities said March was the second coldest in its records dating back to 1910. China experienced the severest winter weather in 30 years and New Delhi in January recorded the lowest temperature in 44 years."
    Booker adds, "Last week it was reported that 3,318 places in the USA had recorded their lowest temperatures for this time of year since records began. Similar record cold was experienced by places in every province of Canada. So cold has the Russian winter been that Moscow had its deepest snowfall in 134 years of observations."

    Britain's Met Office, an international cheerleading headquarters for global warming hysteria, did concede last December that there would be no further warming at least through 2017, which would make 20 years with no global warming. That reflects grudging recognition of the newly developing trends. But that reflects as well growing divergence between the reality of real world temperatures and the projections of the climate models at the foundation of the global warming alarmism of the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Since those models have never been validated, they are not science at this point, but just made up fantasies. That is why, "In the 12 years to 2011, 11 out of 12 [global temperature] forecasts [of the Met Office] were too high - and... none were colder than [resulted]," as BBC climate correspondent Paul Hudson wrote in January.

    Global warming was never going to be the problem that the Lysenkoists who have brought down western science made it out to be. Human emissions of CO2 are only 4 to 5% of total global emissions, counting natural causes. Much was made of the total atmospheric concentration of CO2 exceeding 400 parts per million. But if you asked the daffy NBC correspondent who hysterically reported on that what portion of the atmosphere 400 parts per million is, she transparently wouldn't be able to tell you. One percent of the atmosphere would be 10,000 parts per million. The atmospheric concentrations of CO2 deep in the geologic past were much, much greater than today, yet life survived, and we have no record of any of the catastrophes the hysterics have claimed. Maybe that is because the temperature impact of increased concentrations of CO2 declines logarithmically. That means there is a natural limit to how much increased CO2 can effectively warm the planet, which would be well before any of the supposed climate catastrophes the warming hysterics have tried to use to shut down capitalist prosperity.

    Yet, just last week, there was Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson telling us, by way of attempting to tutor Rep. Lamar Smith (R-TX), Chairman of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology, "For the record, and for the umpteenth time, there is no 'great amount of uncertainty' about whether the planet is warming and why." If you can read, and you have gotten this far in my column, you know why Robinson's ignorance is just another Washington Post abuse of the First Amendment. Mr. Robinson, let me introduce you to the British Met Office, stalwart of Global Warming "science," such as it is, which has already publicly confessed that we are already three quarters through 20 years of No Global Warming!

    Booker could have been writing about Robinson when he concluded his Sunday Telegraph commentary by writing, "Has there ever in history been such an almighty disconnect between observable reality and the delusions of a political class that is quite impervious to any rational discussion?"

    But there is a fundamental problem with the temperature records from this contentious period, when climate science crashed into political science. The land based records, which have been under the control of global warming alarmists at the British Met Office and the Hadley Centre Climate Research Unit, and at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in the U.S., show much more warming during this period than the incorruptible satellite atmosphere temperature records. Those satellite records have been further confirmed by atmospheric weather balloons. But the land based records can be subject to tampering and falsification.

    Sentiment: Buy

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    • BRAZIL CITIES RATIONING WATER AS DROUGHT SAPS RESERVOIR SUPPLIES

      By Randall Hackley - Feb 17, 2014 | Bloomberg

      The southern cities of Guarulhos, Sao Caetano do Sul and Diadema say Brazil’s biggest water utility cut supplies as much as a third in response to the worst drought in decades. Guarulhos, site of Sao Paulo’s international airport, said last week it was rationing in six neighborhoods.

      Cia de Saneamento Basico do Estado de Sao Paulo, or Sabesp, denies it reduced water to any municipality, and said today there’s no rationing. The Folha de S. Paulo newspaper reported Feb. 15 that water was being rationed to almost 6 million people in 142 cities in 11 states as supplies shrink in reservoirs and rivers to decade-low levels.

      Reservoir levels at the Cantareira water system, biggest of six that supply almost half of the 20 million residents of metropolitan Sao Paulo, remained steady for a second day today at 18.5 percent after falling daily since Jan. 19. On Feb. 3, Sabesp offered Cantareira clients a 30 percent discount in exchange for cutting water usage. Brazil’s heat wave and driest rainy season in decades has hurt coffee and sugar cane output at the world’s top producer of the crops as well as soy forecasts.

      Sentiment: Strong Buy

    • Antarctic Sea Ice Sets New Record For Jan 31st

      February 2, 2014

      By Paul Homewood

      Antarctic sea ice extent continues to break records. Extent at 31st January, of 4.540 million sq km, beat the previous record set in 2008. This is 26% higher than the climatological average for this date of 3.598 million sq km.

      On average, Antarctic sea ice reaches minimum on 20th February, about a month earlier, relatively speaking, than the Arctic. It is likely then that we will see a new record high minimum set this month. The current record was set in 2008, with 3.691 million sq km.

      Meanwhile, global sea ice area is normal.

      Sentiment: Buy

    • lonesome -

      Reporting what others state can be great sport. Though doing so is often evidence the one reporting is possibly unable to think for himself.

      That said, what know you of alpha and beta errors, aka Type I and Type II errors?

      And, more significantly, what know those of said errors whom you re-publish their positions?

      Re-publishing drivel as if it were meaningful substance is one thing. Ability to make error free decisions in less than perfect information situations is quite another.

      There are many, it would seem, that would have you undertake another 'Bull's Run', where, given your post's, you are eager. You would be wise to study Admiral Halsey and his decisions re TF34 and juxtapose the decisions made in light of the information available with your views re 'global warming', more accurately known as climate change.

      Cheers,

    • DEBATING WHAT'S HAPPENING BEFORE YOUR EYES

      by digby | 2/16/204

      I just heard a "debate"between mayors on TV about the climate change. Here's an excerpt, featuring a climatologist named Heidi Cullen, Governor McCrory of North Carolina and Mayor Eric Garcetti of Los Angeles:
      GARCETTI: This was the driest year on record. But, you know, it's coming at an immense cost, whether it's wildfires, whether it's changing how we get water. But governors and mayors, you know, we don't have the luxury of debating the issue. I think it's clear human beings have had an impact on creating the problem, but we have to solve it now.

      We're dealing with that in Los Angeles, because we've done some common sense things out here to conserve water, change out our landscaping, strengthen our building codes. But it's not a question anymore about this happening every so often, we're expecting this to be the new status quo.

      STEPHANOPOULOS: And you're getting to the question of why.

      Let me bring that to Heidi Cullen right here.

      And Heidi, first of all, one of the big points you make is that all extreme weather is connect -- the drought in the west connected to the blizzards in the east.

      HEIDI CULLEN, CLIMATOLOGIST: Yeah, well Ginger did a great job setting it up. The cold that we're seeing here is very much connected to this broader pattern. And really when you put it into context, climate change, burning fossil fuels means that we're going to see more of these very expensive extreme weather events, specifically the kinds of extremes we can expect -- more heat waves, droughts, floods. We're already seeing those.

      You know, this winter certainly doesn't disprove global warming. I think it's one of these things where every time we have a really cold winter we begin to ask ourselves all over again, so is global warming real or not. Cold winter doesn't mean global warming is gone.

      And really, when you look at the big picture, we've actually globally been incredibly warm. January is probably going to come in as one of the top three warmest Januaries on record. And, you know, the 10 warmest years have all happened since 1988.

      STEPHANOPOULOS: But your big point is that on these intense weather systems they're made more intense by climate change.

      CULLEN: That's right. I mean, basically when you warm up the planet, you've got more moisture in the atmosphere, which means that when it rains it rains heavier. And you can also evaporate more, so that means that the tendency for drought is going to get worse.

      So the kinds of droughts that we've been seeing in Texas, our in California right now, we know that climate change makes them worse.

      It's actually very similar to cigarette smoking and lung cancer, it increases the likelihood of that risk. We've already looked at the Texas drought in 2011. We know that climate change made that drought 20 times more likely.

      STEPHANOPOULOS: Governor McCrory, do you accept that argument? In the past you've said that you believe that this whole issue of climate change is in god's hands.

      MCCRORY: Well, I believe there is climate change. I'm not sure you can call it climate warming any more, especially here in the Carolinas.

      I think the big debate is how much of it is man-made and how much will just naturally happen, as the Earth evolves. And the question then is what do we do about it, and how much it will cost the consumer.

      I concentrate on cleaning the environment. I think that's where our argument should be, cleaning our air, cleaning our water and cleaning the ground. And we're at a brown fields area which we're in right now in Charlotte where we cleaned up the ground right here and cleaned up old brown fields and now we have great new development.

      But the whole issue of cleaning the environment I think is the issue we ought to talk about more than getting to a debate from the left and the right about climate change or global warming. It's all about cleaning our environment and have a good quality of life for not only now, but for future generations.

      Uhm, no. There is no debate and "cleaning the water and the ground" is not going to solve this problem. I'm sure it's a good thing to persuade the neanderthals that not polluting the water is necessary. In fact, we settled that whole debate about 40 years ago. Under Richard Nixon. But it's simply not good enough to say that anymore. Until leaders accept their responsibility to tell the people the truth about this we're just going to watch it happen. And it's scarier than hell. In fact, here in the west we're already burning up.

      Sentiment: Strong Buy

    • THE END OF SNOW?

      PORTER FOX | NY Times | FEB. 7, 2014

      OVER the next two weeks, hundreds of millions of people will watch Americans like Ted Ligety and Mikaela Shiffrin ski for gold on the downhill alpine course. Television crews will pan across epic vistas of the rugged Caucasus Mountains, draped with brilliant white ski slopes. What viewers might not see is the 16 million cubic feet of snow that was stored under insulated blankets last year to make sure those slopes remained white, or the hundreds of snow-making guns that have been running around the clock to keep them that way.

      Officials canceled two Olympic test events last February in Sochi after several days of temperatures above 60 degrees Fahrenheit and a lack of snowfall had left ski trails bare and brown in spots. That situation led the climatologist Daniel Scott, a professor of global change and tourism at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, to analyze potential venues for future Winter Games. His thought was that with a rise in the average global temperature of more than 7 degrees Fahrenheit possible by 2100, there might not be that many snowy regions left in which to hold the Games. He concluded that of the 19 cities that have hosted the Winter Olympics, as few as 10 might be cold enough by midcentury to host them again. By 2100, that number shrinks to 6.

      The planet has warmed 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit since the 1800s, and as a result, snow is melting. In the last 47 years, a million square miles of spring snow cover has disappeared from the Northern Hemisphere. Europe has lost half of its Alpine glacial ice since the 1850s, and if climate change is not reined in, two-thirds of European ski resorts will be likely to close by 2100.

      The same could happen in the United States, where in the Northeast, more than half of the 103 ski resorts may no longer be viable in 30 years because of warmer winters. As far for the Western part of the country, it will lose an estimated 25 to 100 percent of its snowpack by 2100 if greenhouse gas emissions are not curtailed — reducing the snowpack in Park City, Utah, to zero and relegating skiing to the top quarter of Ajax Mountain in Aspen.

      The facts are straightforward: The planet is getting hotter. Snow melts above 32 degrees Fahrenheit. The Alps are warming two to three times faster than the worldwide average, possibly because of global circulation patterns. Since 1970, the rate of winter warming per decade in the United States has been triple the rate of the previous 75 years, with the strongest trends in the Northern regions of the country. Nine of the 10 hottest years on record have occurred since 2000, and this winter is already looking to be one of the driest on record — with California at just 12 percent of its average snowpack in January, and the Pacific Northwest at around 50 percent.

      To a skier, snowboarder or anyone who has spent time in the mountains, the idea of brown peaks in midwinter is surreal. Poets write of the grace and beauty by which snowflakes descend and transform a landscape. Powder hounds follow the 100-odd storms that track across the United States every winter, then drive for hours to float down a mountainside in the waist-deep “cold smoke” that the storms leave behind.

      The snow I learned to ski on in northern Maine was more blue than white, and usually spewed from snow-making guns instead of the sky. I didn’t like skiing at first. It was cold. And uncomfortable.

      Artificial snow-making has become the stopgap defense against the early effects of climate change. Björn Andrén/Matton Collection — Corbis
      Then, when I was 12, the mystical confluence of vectors that constitute a ski turn aligned, and I was hooked. I scrubbed toilets at my father’s boatyard on Mount Desert Island in high school so I could afford a ski pass and sold season passes in college at Mad River Glen in Vermont to get a free pass for myself. After graduating, I moved to Jackson Hole, Wyo., for the skiing. Four years later, Powder magazine hired me, and I’ve been an editor there ever since.

      My bosses were generous enough to send me to five continents over the last 15 years, with skis in tow. I’ve skied the lightest snow on earth on the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido, where icy fronts spin off the Siberian plains and dump 10 feet of powder in a matter of days. In the high peaks of Bulgaria and Morocco, I slid through snow stained pink by grains of Saharan sand that the crystals formed around.

      In Baja, Mexico, I skied a sliver of hardpack snow at 10,000 feet on Picacho del Diablo, sandwiched between the Sea of Cortez and the Pacific Ocean. A few years later, a crew of skiers and I journeyed to the whipsaw Taurus Mountains in southern Turkey to ski steep couloirs alongside caves where troglodytes lived thousands of years ago.

      At every range I traveled to, I noticed a brotherhood among mountain folk: Say you’re headed into the hills, and the doors open. So it has been a surprise to see the winter sports community, as one of the first populations to witness effects of climate change in its own backyard, not reacting more vigorously and swiftly to reverse the fate we are writing for ourselves.

      It’s easy to blame the big oil companies and the billions of dollars they spend on influencing the media and popular opinion. But the real reason is a lack of knowledge. I know, because I, too, was ignorant until I began researching the issue for a book on the future of snow.

      I was floored by how much snow had already disappeared from the planet, not to mention how much was predicted to melt in my lifetime. The ski season in parts of British Columbia is four to five weeks shorter than it was 50 years ago, and in eastern Canada, the season is predicted to drop to less than two months by midcentury. At Lake Tahoe, spring now arrives two and a half weeks earlier, and some computer models predict that the Pacific Northwest will receive 40 to 70 percent less snow by 2050. If greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise — they grew 41 percent between 1990 and 2008 — then snowfall, winter and skiing will no longer exist as we know them by the end of the century.

      The effect on the ski industry has already been significant. Between 1999 and 2010, low snowfall years cost the industry $1 billion and up to 27,000 jobs. Oregon took the biggest hit out West, with 31 percent fewer skier visits during low snow years. Next was Washington at 28 percent, Utah at 14 percent and Colorado at 7.7 percent.

      The winter sports industry contributes $66 billion annually to the nation’s economy, and supports more than 960,000 jobs across 38 states, according to the Outdoor Industry Association. A surprisingly large sector of the United States economy appears to be teetering on the brink.

      Much of these environmental data come from a 2012 report, “Climate Impacts on the Winter Tourism Economy in the United States,” by two University of New Hampshire researchers, Elizabeth Burakowski and Matthew Magnusson. The paper was commissioned by the Natural Resources Defense Council and a start-up advocacy group called Protect Our Winters. The professional snowboarder Jeremy Jones started that group, known as POW, in 2007 when he realized that many of the slopes he had once ridden no longer held snow. It has since become the leading voice for those fighting to save winter, largely because few others are doing anything about it.

      The National Ski Area Association has reacted with relatively ineffective campaigns like Sustainable Slopes and the Climate Challenge, while policies at ski resorts range from aggressively green to indifferent. Somewhere in between lie the majority of American ski areas, which are struggling to make ends meet while pushing recycling, car-pooling, carbon offsets and awareness campaigns to show they care.

      Sentiment: Strong Buy

    • GOV. JERRY BROWN DECLARES DROUGHT EMERGENCY IN CALIFORNIA

      By Anthony York | LA Times | January 17, 2014

      SAN FRANCISCO -- AMID CALIFORNIA’S DRIEST YEAR ON RECORD, GOV. JERRY BROWN ON FRIDAY OFFICIALLY DECLARED A DROUGHT EMERGENCY IN THE STATE.

      Speaking at a San Francisco news conference, Brown also called on "all citizens" to cut back "at least 20% of their water use." He was flanked by charts and photos showing the state's anemic precipitation and snowpack.

      "We ought to be ready for a long, continued, persistent effort to restrain our water use," Brown said, adding that conservation efforts would be "voluntary."

      Brown’s announcement, which lawmakers, farmers and activists have been urging for weeks, comes as state reservoirs are critically low and cities across the state have already begun water-rationing measures.

      While Brown has downplayed the effect of an official drought declaration, those affected by the water shortage say it will be an important tool in focusing Californians on the problem.

      The announcement came as Brown faced growing pressure to act. On Thursday, hundreds of activists from the Central Valley joined a bipartisan cadre of state lawmakers on the steps of the Capitol in Sacramento to urge the governor to take action.

      During a recent two-day swing from Fresno to Bakersfield, Brown was asked about the water shortage at every stop. He met with farmers and agriculture leaders from the Westlands Water District in Fresno on Monday, and promised those in attendance that administration action would be forthcoming.

      Sentiment: Strong Buy

    • HOUSE REPUBLICANS PICK CLIMATE SKEPTIC TO HEAD ENVIRONMENT SUBCOMMITTEE

      Kate Sheppard | HuffPost | 01/16/2014

      WASHINGTON -- House Republicans selected Rep. David Schweikert (R-Ariz.), who is on the record questioning whether humans are causing climate change, to head of the Science Committee's environment subcommittee.

      Schweikert will replace Rep. Chris Stewart (R-Utah), who moved to the House Appropriations Committee. He said he plans to use his new post to target the Obama administration's regulatory agenda.

      "Too often, this Administration has tried to bypass Congress and impose its will on the American people through regulatory fiat,” Schweikert said Thursday in a statement, The Hill reported. “We have a responsibility to provide a check-and-balance to ensure there is fairness and openness in the process and that taxpayers are not being subjected to onerous and unnecessarily burdensome rules and regulations."

      A main component of the Obama administration's environmental work is new limits on power plants' greenhouse gas pollution. Schweikert has argued that the idea of man-made global warming may be "folklore."

      "Understanding what part of climate change is part of a natural cycle and what part has human components is the first step," he said as a candidate in 2008. "Our elected officials must be careful to react to facts and not folklore."

      IN A FACEBOOK POST LAST YEAR, HOWEVER, SCHWEIKERT SEEMED TO INDICATE THAT REDUCING CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS MIGHT BE A GOOD THING -- WHILE BASHING PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA'S EFFORTS TO DO SO. HE WROTE ON JUNE 25:

      IN LIGHT OF OBAMA'S 'CLIMATE CHANGE' SPEECH TODAY, I WOULD LIKE TO REMIND HIM THAT AT THE TIME OF ITS EXPIRATION, THE KYOTO PROTOCOL MANDATED THAT DEVELOPED NATIONS REDUCE THEIR CO2 OUTPUT BY AN AVERAGE OF 5.2%. THOUGH WE NEVER RATIFIED THE KYOTO PROTOCOL, OUR COUNTRY WAS ABLE TO REDUCE CO2 THROUGH NEW TECHNOLOGY IN THE PRIVATE SECTOR, NOT TOP-DOWN, ECONOMIC CRUSHING GOVERNMENT MANDATES.

      The Kyoto Protocol is the international treaty on climate change that took effect in 2004, which the United States declined to join. A significant portion of the reduction in emissions that the U.S. has achieved since then is due to rising consumption of natural gas, which is noted in a blog post that Schweikert linked to in his post. That, and the recession.

      Schweikert will have good company in Science Committee leadership. Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) is also a climate change denier.

      Democrats criticized the appointment.

      "EVERY TIME WE THINK CONGRESSIONAL REPUBLICANS HAVE PROVEN THEY’RE COMPLETELY OUT OF TOUCH WITH REALITY, THEY GO AND OUTDO THEMSELVES," said Josh Schwerin, press secretary for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. "BY PUTTING A CLIMATE CHANGE DENIER IN CHARGE OF A SUBCOMMITTEE ON THE ENVIRONMENT, CONGRESSIONAL REPUBLICANS ARE FURTHER CEMENTING THE FACT THAT THEIR ONLY REAL PRIORITY IS PROTECTING SPECIAL INTERESTS AND THEIR BIG OIL BACKERS."

      Sentiment: Strong Buy

    • Lonesome, is there anyone more backward than you, besides Doc(aka; Bum), Theres, Deme, and some others? And since you don't believe in science, you need to find a time machine that would take you back to the Dark Ages, where you really belong.

    • elk will defend the idiocy like a champ

    • THOREAU’S WALDEN POND HEATS UP

      Tim Radford, Climate News Network | Jan 16, 2014

      LONDON—Walden, where Henry David Thoreau planted beans on land that had yielded only cinquefoil, blackberries, johnswort and sweet wild fruits, is changing. The trees and shrubs around Walden Pond are now out on average 18 days earlier than 150 years ago, when Thoreau made his observations. And, according to US scientists in the journal New Phytologist, native species could lose out to invasive shrubs such as the Japanese barberry.

      CONCORD IN MASSACHUSETTS OCCUPIES A SPECIAL PLACE IN AMERICA’S HISTORY: IT WAS THE SITE OF THE FIRST BATTLE OF THE WAR OF INDEPENDENCE IN THE 18TH CENTURY, AND LATER IT WAS IMMORTALISED BY THE WRITINGS OF THOREAU. BUT THE 19TH CENTURY AUTHOR DID MORE THAN PUBLISH ELEGANT OBSERVATIONS OF THE NATURAL ECONOMY. HE ALSO RECORDED THE FIRST MOMENT WHEN LEAVES EMERGED ON THE TREES AROUND WALDEN POND, NEAR CONCORD, AND DID SO FOR FIVE YEARS BETWEEN 1852 AND 1860.

      CAROLINE POLGAR, A STUDENT AT BOSTON UNIVERSITY, DECIDED TO REPEAT HIS OBSERVATIONS. WHAT SHE FOUND WAS SURPRISING: “ALL SPECIES – NO EXCEPTIONS – ARE LEAFING OUT EARLIER NOW THAN THEY DID IN THOREAU’S TIME. ON AVERAGE, WOODY PLANTS IN CONCORD LEAF OUT 18 DAYS EARLIER NOW.”

      Between 2009 and 2013 she and her fellow author Amanda Gallinat made observations of 43 woody plants in the region. They also tested 50 species by collecting dormant twigs and placing them in water to see when leaves unfurled in unusually warm laboratory conditions.

      DOUBLE JEOPARDY

      “We found compelling evidence that invasive shrubs such as Japanese barberry are ready to leaf out quickly once they are exposed to warm temperatures in the lab even in the middle of winter, whereas native shrubs, like highbush blueberry, and native trees, like red maple, need to go through a longer winter chilling period before they can leaf out – and even then their response is slow”, said Gallinat.

      “The experiments show that as spring weather continues to warm, it will be the invasive shrubs that will be best able to take advantage of the changing conditions.”

      Richard Primack, third author and professor of biology at Boston University, said: “We see that climate change is creating a whole new risk for native plants in Concord.

      “Weather in New England is unpredictable, and if plants leaf out early in warm years, they risk having their leaves damaged by a surprise frost. But if plants wait to leaf out until all chance of frost is lost, they may lose their competitive advantage.”

      Sentiment: Strong Buy

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