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  • lonesome_polecatt lonesome_polecatt Aug 8, 2014 9:18 PM Flag

    Thank God for global warming otherwise this could have been much worse.

    Summer 2014 is coldest in a decade

    By Jennifer Bain and Sophia Rosenbaum

    August 8, 2014 | 4:55pm

    Summer 2014 is coldest in a decade

    The summer of 2014 has been one of the mildest on the books — and could be the first summer in a decade without a heatwave.

    “It wasn’t clear if it was going to be a hot or a cool summer,” said National Weather Service meteorologist David Stark. “We started out the year very cool and it seems like we just continued that. It doesn’t look like we have any heat waves in the near future.”

    Instead of searching for the skimpiest outfits to battle the sizzling sun, New Yorkers are reaching for their sweatshirts.

    “It’s been so much colder this summer,” said Susan Vartholomatos, 51, who broke out her bikini for a beach day Friday afternoon. “In the morning, when I go out to my terrace, I need a sweatshirt.”

    Vartholomatos said she wishes it was hotter, adding “I’d take heat and humidity over snow any day.”

    Only four days have hit 90 degrees this summer, three in July and one in August, with the hottest temperature on the books clocking in at 91.

    The last time the city went without a heat wave – classified as three consecutive days of temperatures higher than 90 degrees – was in 2004.

    The cooler temps aren’t just affecting people looking to get a good tan. Beach businesses at Coney Island say they’ve taken a hit this season.

    “This is the coldest I’ve experienced in a while,” said Ahmad Hussian, whose father owns a store called Sun & Fun on Surf Avenue. “Not a lot of people are coming here at all, but I have sold a lot of hoodies.”

    Monica Ghee, who has been working a game called Coney Island High Striker for 45 summers, said the boardwalk clears out at night.

    “It’s been a strange season,” she said. “There’s been no real summer so far.”

    While a late summer heat wave is possible, forecasters at the National Weather Service say there’s a slim chance one will slip in the next few weeks.

    Typically, the city sees at least 15 days that top 90 degrees with at least one heat wave mixed in.

    “We haven’t even had a day where it reaches 100 degrees,” complained Naquan Gathers, who runs a Ghost’s Hole at Coney Island.

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    • The Arctic ice cap over the last two years has grown bigger and thicker, so that an area twice the size of Alaska, that was open water two years ago, is now covered with ice. What a nerve Nature has to flout Al Gore's prediction, made some s 7 years ago, that the polar ice cap could be gone by now. But nevermind - the lying leftists will come up with some lie or other to explain this away.

    • Myth of arctic meltdown: Stunning satellite images show summer ice cap is thicker and covers 1.7million square kilometres MORE than 2 years ago...despite Al Gore's prediction it would be ICE-FREE by now
      Seven years after former US Vice-President Al Gore's warning, Arctic ice cap has expanded for second year in row
      An area twice the size of Alaska - America's biggest state - was open water two years ago and is now covered in ice
      These satellite images taken from University of Illinois's Cryosphere project show ice has become more concentrated

    • Does anyone understand the meaning of OT?

      Sentiment: Hold

    • 'Thank God for global warming otherwise this could have been much worse.' Lest ye forget,the nation's breadbasket has experienced an unparalleled drought here in CA. Better pray to God that we don't get another year of drought (cool Summer in the East) as the lakes are mudholes and food prices are going through the roof, not to mention the acreage burned in wildfires grows every year. Yes, it's really that bad.

      • 2 Replies to sharpeiweb
      • SATELLITE MAPPING SHOWS ICE CAPS’ FASTER MELT RATE

        By Tim Radford | Climate News Network | Sep 1, 2014

        LONDON— GERMAN RESEARCHERS HAVE ESTABLISHED THE HEIGHT OF THE GREENLAND AND ANTARCTIC ICE CAPS WITH GREATER PRECISION THAN EVER BEFORE. AND THE NEW MAPS THEY HAVE PRODUCED SHOW THAT THE ICE IS MELTING AT AN UNPRECEDENTED RATE.

        The maps, produced with a satellite-mounted instrument, have elevation accuracies to within a few metres. Since Greenland’s ice cap is more than 2,000 metres thick on average, and the Antarctic bedrock supports 61% of the planet’s fresh water, this means that scientists can make more accurate assessments of annual melting.

        Dr Veit Helm and other glaciologists at the Alfred Wegener Institute’s Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven, Germany, report in the journal The Cryosphere that, between them, the two ice sheets are now losing ice at the unprecedented rate of 500 cubic kilometres a year.

        BIG PICTURE

        The measurements used to make the maps were taken by an instrument aboard the European Space Agency’s orbiting satellite CryoSat-2. The satellite gets closer to the poles ? to 88° latitude ? than any previous mission and traverses almost 16 million sq km of ice, adding an area of ice the size of Spain to the big picture of change and loss in the frozen world.

        CryoSat-2’s radar altimeter transmitted 7.5 million measurements of Greenland and 61 million of Antarctica during 2012, enabling glaciologists to work with a set of consistent measurements from a single instrument.

        Over a three-year period, the researchers collected 200 million measurements in Antarctica and more than 14 million in Greenland. They were able to study how the ice sheets changed by comparing the data with measurements made by NASA’s ICESat mission.

        MORE COMPLEX

        Greenland’s volume of ice is being reduced at the rate of 375 cubic km a year. In Antarctica, the picture is more complex as the West Antarctic ice sheet is losing ice rapidly, but is growing in volume in East Antarctica.

        Overall, the southern continent ? 98% of which is covered with ice and snow ? is losing 125 cubic km a year. These are the highest rates observed since researchers started making satellite observations 20 years ago.

        “Since 2009, the volume loss in Greenland has increased by a factor of about two, and the West Antarctic ice sheet by a factor of three,” said Angelika Humbert, one of the report’s authors.

      • Right you are, sharpei, but the RWNJs can't see it yet and probably never will even if they starve or drown some day

        +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

        'Thank God for global warming otherwise this could have been much worse.' Lest ye forget,the nation's breadbasket has experienced an unparalleled drought here in CA. Better pray to God that we don't get another year of drought (cool Summer in the East) as the lakes are mudholes and food prices are going through the roof, not to mention the acreage burned in wildfires grows every year. Yes, it's really that bad.

    • severe unusual weather hot or cold is attributable to global warming by some, how about lightning on the beaches of California during thunderstorm?

    • Once again, poleonutt, despite previously posted evidence to the contrary, you remain locked inside logic-proof compartment of RWNJ peremptory dogma. This time you are focusing on only one city in the world despite the fact that the topic is GLOBAL warming.

      You really do, in general, have to broaden your scope and get beyond your own little hovel, even more so on this issue, in order to fully understand what is happening around the whole planet:

      +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

      HOTTEST MAY IN RECORDED HISTORY

      The Huffington Post | By Emily Thomas | 06/23/2014

      This past May was a scorcher. According to a new report, it was the hottest May in recorded history.

      The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Monday that combined average May temperatures on land and sea surfaces were at 1.33 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th-century average of 58.6 degrees. "Four of the five warmest Mays on record have occurred in the past five years," the NOAA also wrote in its report. The previous hottest May on record was in 2010.

      The warmest regions last month were reportedly eastern Kazakhstan, central and northwestern Australia and parts of Indonesia, according to The Washington Post.

      Scientists believe the higher temperatures are likely a sign of an impending El Niño, a periodic warming of Pacific Ocean waters which brings heavy rainfall but could also be beneficial to parts of the globe experiencing droughts. The Climate Prediction Center says there is a 70 percent chance of El Niño returning this summer, increasing to an 80 percent chance by fall. The last major El Niño occurred in 1997, resulting in billions of dollars of damage around the world.

      Sentiment: Strong Buy

      • 1 Reply to elk_1l
      • "This past May was a scorcher. According to a new report, it was the hottest May in recorded history.

        I wonder where this "scorcher" in May was. I travelled different parts of America and the world to date, and can't remember ever being scorched. I will also submit that my lawn care water bill is the lowest this summer than any in recent memory, or past, for that matter. So how much is Gore paying you and Arianna Puff Po to purvey this propaganda and falsehood.

        We have heard about the "Oceanic" gurus cooking the books on historic temperature data, this makes the not credible, jes like blue and you.....hehehehehe

    • I should warn you Lonesome. The man caused global warming fraudsters are not going to like your post.

      • 1 Reply to rdotn38
      • Like you elk, NOAA has been known to lie.

        Summer 2014 is the coldest in a decade

        By Jennifer Bain and Sophia Rosenbaum

        The summer of 2014 has been one of the mildest on the books — and could be the first summer in a decade without a heatwave.

        “It wasn’t clear if it was going to be a hot or a cool summer,” said National Weather Service meteorologist David Stark. “We started out the year very cool and it seems like we just continued that. It doesn’t look like we have any heat waves in the near future.”

        Instead of searching for the skimpiest outfits to battle the sizzling sun, New Yorkers are reaching for their sweatshirts.

        “It’s been so much colder this summer,” said Susan Vartholomatos, 51, who broke out her bikini for a beach day Friday afternoon. “In the morning, when I go out to my terrace, I need a sweatshirt.”

        Vartholomatos said she wishes it was hotter, adding “I’d take heat and humidity over snow any day.”

        Only four days have hit 90 degrees this summer, three in July and one in August, with the hottest temperature on the books clocking in at 91.

        The last time the city went without a heat wave – classified as three consecutive days of temperatures higher than 90 degrees – was in 2004.

        The cooler temps aren’t just affecting people looking to get a good tan. Beach businesses at Coney Island say they’ve taken a hit this season.

        “This is the coldest I’ve experienced in a while,” said Ahmad Hussian, whose father owns a store called Sun & Fun on Surf Avenue. “Not a lot of people are coming here at all, but I have sold a lot of hoodies.”

        Monica Ghee, who has been working a game called Coney Island High Striker for 45 summers, said the boardwalk clears out at night.

        “It’s been a strange season,” she said. “There’s been no real summer so far.”

        While a late summer heat wave is possible, forecasters at the National Weather Service say there’s a slim chance one will slip in the next few weeks.

        Typically, the city sees at least 15 days that top 90 degrees with at least one heat wave mixed in.

        “We haven’t even had a day where it reaches 100 degrees,” complained Naquan Gathers, who runs a Ghost’s Hole at Coney Island.