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Harris & Harris Group, Inc. Message Board

  • bigmarginman bigmarginman Jul 10, 2007 3:01 PM Flag

    Just Bought In

    Dip under $11 too much to resist. Look forward to a good few months ahead.

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    • To answer your question, it's really simple. Tech creates new industries with high margins and thus unanticipated wealth for our economy. No other industry can make that claim. Let's see. When we were struggling during the early 80's (savings-and-loan scandal, defense industry meltdown, etc.), the advent of personal computers stimulated the market. When we were struggling during the early to mid 90's (recession), biotech and internet stimulated the market. Even after the internet bubble, rich-internet media has created new wealth (Google anyone?). When we see another recession in 2008, you'll see that nanotechnology will bring us out of our misery. It won't be housing. It won't be energy. It won't be the internet. It definitely won't be consumer goods. People put money into safe companies like PG and WMT during recessionary times. People only take money out of them, when the economy improves, which doesn't just happen by itself. It needs a stimulus. Nanotechnology will be that stimulus. You'll see. I bet there were people questioning the impact of personal computers in the 80's. There were definitely people who bashed the internet. No one is bashing them now.

      It takes vision, different than daydreaming, to make things happen. I don't think I have been daydreaming about nanotechnology. I spent five years of my life researching things at nanoscales in the depths of university labs. I invested my future in nanotechnology, so it makes sense to invest in stocks that have nanotechnology exposure. Oh, I forgot to mention that HP, INTC, IBM, GE and many others are already benefiting from nanotechnology. This trend will continue, because they are investing billions of their own money into their respective nanotechnology R&D groups.

      I'm not here to hype TINY. I couldn't care less if you or anyone else here buys TINY. You couldn't move the price of TINY's stock even if you wanted to. It's up to the institutions to do that.

      Stocknewbie7

    • i bought today, its bottomed!


      (yawn)

    • I think you made a good choice, but it may go down more, this is a long term committment.

      • 1 Reply to georgiagn
      • I'm bullish on TINY both near-term and long-term. It seems like everyone believes that the IPO market in nanospace will heat up as the 2007 comes to close. Why not buy some call options? I'm holding some $12.50 December call options. I might buy some more or pick up some stock shares.

        I'm not a pure speculator. I have some background in nanotechnology. Do you homework, however; don't ever rely on one person's opinion to buy or sell stock. At the end of the day, it's your money.

        stocknewbie7

    • I am tempted as well!!!!!!!!!!

      • 1 Reply to hewitson2
      • big and hew.

        No position in TINY yet.

        I follow Essex Investment Management, TINY's largest institutional holder as of 3/31/07. There was a article in Barrons March 5, 2007 with Joseph McNay of Essex. I found SNCR @$15 from that article.

        Re: TINY "Of course , I still like Harris & Harris, a venture-capital firm for nanotech companies. They have a couple of very good companies in their portfolio, one or two of which I think could go public in the next six to 12 months." McNay.

        It's funny because I had a Yahoo finance alert today. Months ago I had put the alert for when TINY hit $11.

        So, if you could be so kind as to tell me why you are buying TINY?

        Thanking you in advance for your response.

        bow

 
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