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  • bluecheese4u bluecheese4u Dec 13, 2012 1:30 PM Flag

    Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report December 13, 2012

    Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report December 13, 2012

    December 13, 2012 at 10:30 a.m. (eastern time) for the Week Ending December 7, 2012

    Summary
    Working gas in storage was 3,806 Bcf as of Friday, December 7, 2012, according to EIA estimates. This represents a net increase of 2 Bcf from the previous week. Stocks were 48 Bcf higher than last year at this time and 283 Bcf above the 5-year average of 3,523 Bcf. In the East Region, stocks were 42 Bcf above the 5-year average following net withdrawals of 12 Bcf. Stocks in the Producing Region were 171 Bcf above the 5-year average of 1,114 Bcf after a net injection of 12 Bcf. Stocks in the West Region were 70 Bcf above the 5-year average after a net addition of 2 Bcf. At 3,806 Bcf, total working gas is above the 5-year historical range.
    Working gas stocks in the Producing Region, for the week ending December 7, 2012, totaled 1,285 Bcf, with 320 Bcf in salt cavern facilities and 966 Bcf in nonsalt cavern facilities. Working gas stocks increased 4 Bcf in the salt cavern facilities and increased 9 in the nonsalt cavern facilities since November 30. An historical series of the salt and nonsalt subtotals of the Producing Region is available for download at

    eia

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    Summary of Weekly Petroleum Data for the Week Ending December 7, 2012

    U.S. crude oil refinery inputs averaged about 15.4 million barrels per day during the week ending December 7, 62 thousand barrels per day below the previous week’s average. Refineries operated at 90.4 percent of their operable capacity last week. Gasoline production decreased last week, averaging 8.9 million barrels per day. Distillate fuel production decreased last week, averaging just under 4.8 million barrels per day.

    U.S. crude oil imports averaged 8.5 million barrels per day last week, up by 269 thousand barrels per day from the previous week. Over the last four weeks, crude oil imports have averaged about 8.2 million barrels per day, 631 thousand barrels per day below the same four-week period last year. Total motor gasoline imports (including both finished gasoline and gasoline blending components) last week averaged 585 thousand barrels per day. Distillate fuel imports averaged 191 thousand barrels per day last week.

    U.S. commercial crude oil inventories (excluding those in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve) increased by 0.8 million barrels from the previous week. At 372.6 million barrels, U.S. crude oil inventories are well above the upper limit of the average range for this time of year. Total motor gasoline inventories increased by 5.0 million barrels last week and are in the upper half of the average range. Both finished gasoline inventories and blending components inventories increased last week. Distillate fuel inventories increased by 3.0 million barrels last week but remained well below the lower limit of the average range for this time of year. Propane/propylene inventories decreased by 1.3 million barrels last week, but remained well above the upper limit of the average range. Total commercial petroleum inventories increased by 5.9 million barrels last week.

    Total products supplied over the last four-week period have averaged 18.9 million barrels per day, up by 3.2 percent from the same period last year. Over the last four weeks, motor gasoline product supplied has averaged over 8.5 million barrels per day, down by 1.3 percent from the same period last year. Distillate fuel product supplied has averaged 3.8 million barrels per day over the last four weeks, down by 0.7 percent from the same period last year. Jet fuel product supplied is 2.6 percent higher over the last four weeks compared to the same four-week period last year.

    eia

    Data Overview (Combined Table 1 and Table 9)
    eia

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    Weekly U.S. Fuel Ethanol/Livestock Feed Production

    ethanolrfa

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    This Week In Petroleum December 12, 2012

    Next Release: December 19, 2012

    Brent crude oil prices forecast to decrease modestly in 2013
    Prices for Brent crude oil have settled into a fairly well-defined range in the fourth quarter of 2012, moving between $106 and about $116 per barrel since early October. In the fourth quarter of 2011, both the level and the range of Brent prices were similar to current levels (Figure 1). That price environment continued into January of 2012 before prices increased sharply in February and March, resulting in the second consecutive year of substantial first-quarter crude oil price increases. However, despite the similarity between prices in the fourth quarters of 2011 and 2012, physical markets are somewhat less indicative of higher prices than at this time last year. The U.S. Energy Administration's (EIA) December 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) forecasts the Brent spot price to fall during the first quarter of 2013 rather than rise as it did in early 2012. For 2013 as a whole, EIA expects Brent to average $104 per barrel, an $8-per-barrel decrease from the expected 2012 annual average of $112 per barrel.

    In its current STEO, EIA forecasts the call on the combination of global inventories and crude oil from the member countries of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Counties (OPEC) to decline through the first half of 2013. This call on inventories and OPEC production is projected to average 30.7 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in the first quarter of 2013 and fall to 29.8 million bbl/d in the second quarter, declines of 0.3 million bbl/d and 1.2 million bbl/d, respectively, from the 2012 fourth quarter. From the fourth quarter of 2011, the call on inventories and OPEC decreased only 0.5 million bbl/d to average 30.8 million bbl/d in the second quarter of 2012.

    This reduction in the call on inventories and OPEC is largely the result of growing liquids production from non-OPEC members. In the December STEO, non-OPEC supply is projected to average 53.7 million bbl/d in the second quarter of 2013, about a 0.8-million-bbl/d increase from the expected fourth-quarter average. Forecast non-OPEC production growth is largely driven by expected increases in production from U.S. tight oil formations and Canadian oil sands. Last year, geopolitical events in Sudan and Syria disrupted production and non-OPEC supply was 0.2 million bbl/d lower in the second quarter of 2012 from the fourth quarter of 2011.

    EIA also expects that OPEC crude oil production in the first half of 2013 will slightly outpace the combined call on inventories and OPEC crude oil production, leading to expected global inventory builds during the first half of 2013.

    Notwithstanding expectations for easing in physical markets and growth in global spare capacity during 2013, current macroeconomics are uncertain and there are risks to the forecast that could push prices higher or lower. EIA projections do not assume any significant economic deterioration in the United States or the European Union (EU) next year, but oil prices could move lower on concerns about the downside risks to future consumption from the so-called "fiscal cliff" in the United States, or from concerns about EU economic stability. Oil prices could move higher as well. In China, the economy has shown signs of improvement over the past two months, as key manufacturing indexes, export volumes, and refining runs have increased, although a sustained rebound is tentative.

    In early 2012, geopolitical disruptions helped bolster Brent prices. Similarly, events in Libya contributed to higher prices in early 2011. While EIA does not forecast geopolitical developments, any new geopolitical threat to supply security would affect global crude markets.

    Financial market indicators also suggest that market expectations of a first-quarter price increase in 2013 are lower than in the fourth quarter of 2012. While the Brent options market is not sufficiently liquid to provide meaningful information on implied volatility beyond the prompt month, options written on West Texas Intermediate (WTI) futures contracts offer a rough idea about market participants' assessment of the likelihood of a major price move. As of the five trading days ending December 6, implied volatility for the WTI contract settling in March 2013 averaged 28 percent. At current market prices this volatility yields a calculated 95-percent confidence interval of $71 to $113 per barrel. Last year at this time, implied volatility for the March 2012 WTI contract was 41 percent, yielding a much wider calculated 95-percent confidence interval of $69 to $142 per barrel. While Brent prices are higher than WTI prices, Brent implied volatility has also decreased recently, settling at 25 percent on December 6, about a 3-percentage-point decrease from November 1, and its lowest level since the second quarter.

    Gasoline and diesel fuel prices fall again
    The U.S. average retail price of regular gasoline decreased five cents to $3.35 per gallon, six cents higher than last year at this time. Prices decreased in all regions of the nation for the second consecutive week, with the largest decrease coming in the Rocky Mountain region, where the price fell eight cents to $3.33 per gallon. The West Coast price has decreased 87 cents since reaching a high for the year in October, and is now $3.54 per gallon, down seven cents from last week. The East Coast, Midwest, and Gulf Coast prices all declined four cents from last week, to $3.42 per gallon, $3.28 per gallon, and $3.12 per gallon, respectively.

    The national average diesel fuel price decreased four cents to $3.99 per gallon, 10 cents higher than last year at this time. The U.S. average diesel price has been below the $4-per-gallon mark three out of the last five weeks. Prices decreased in all regions of the nation, with the largest decrease coming on the West Coast, where the price declined six cents to $4.04 per gallon. The Rocky Mountain price is $3.94 per gallon, down a nickel from last week. Decreasing four cents, the Midwest price is $3.98 per gallon, and both the East Coast and Gulf Coast prices dropped three cents, to $4.07 per gallon and $3.87 per gallon, respectively.

    Propane inventories decline
    U.S. propane stocks fell 1.3 million barrels to end at 71.2 million barrels last week, 12.0 million barrels (20 percent) higher than a year ago. Midwest regional inventories dropped by 0.9 million barrels, while Gulf Coast inventories declined by 0.4 million barrels. Rocky Mountain/West Coast stocks dropped by 0.1 million barrels, and the East Coast region gained slightly. Propylene non-fuel-use inventories represented 5.6 percent of total propane inventories.

    Residential heating oil prices decrease while residential propane remains flat; wholesale prices see biggest decreases since start of season
    Residential heating oil prices declined during the period ending December 10, 2012. The average residential heating oil price fell 4 cents to $3.96 per gallon, nearly 10 cents per gallon higher than the same time last year. Wholesale heating oil prices decreased by 16 cents per gallon last week to $3.06 per gallon, 8 cents per gallon more than last year at this time.

    The average residential propane price was unchanged from last week's price of $2.41 per gallon, 44 cents per gallon lower than the same period last year. Wholesale propane prices decreased by 8 cents to $0.83 per gallon for the week ending December 10, 2012, 60 cents per gallon lower than the December 12, 2011 price.

    eia

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    Short-Term Energy Outlook December 11, 2012

    Next Release Date: January 8, 2013 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures

    Highlights

    •EIA expects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average $110 per barrel in the fourth quarter of 2012, while the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price will average $89 per barrel. The Brent and WTI crude oil spot prices are forecast to average $104 per barrel and $88 per barrel, respectively, in 2013. The projected WTI discount to Brent crude oil, which averaged $23 per barrel in November 2012, falls to an average of $11 per barrel by the fourth quarter of 2013. This forecast rests on the assumption that U.S. real gross domestic product (GDP) grows by 2.1 percent in 2012 and 1.8 percent in 2013, while world-oil-consumption-weighted real GDP grows by 2.7 percent and 2.4 percent in 2012 and 2013, respectively.
    •U.S. monthly average regular gasoline retail prices fell from $3.85 per gallon in September to $3.45 per gallon in November, as crude oil prices fell and the gasoline market transitioned from summer-grade to lower-cost winter-grade gasoline specifications. Projected national average regular gasoline retail prices average $3.63 per gallon in 2012 and $3.43 per gallon in 2013, compared with $3.53 per gallon in 2011. Forecast diesel fuel retail prices average $4.02 per gallon during the fourth quarter of 2012 before falling to an average of $3.84 per gallon in 2013.
    •EIA's projections of average household fuel bills this winter have not changed significantly from last month's STEO. EIA expects household expenditures for space heating fuels will be higher this winter than last winter, primarily because of the return to roughly normal winter temperatures east of the Rocky Mountains compared with last winter's unusual warmth. Average expenditures for households that heat with heating oil are forecast to be higher than any previous winter on record.
    •EIA expects U.S. total crude oil production to average 6.4 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in 2012, an increase of 0.8 million bbl/d from the previous year. Projected domestic crude oil production increases to 7.1 million bbl/d in 2013, 0.2 million bbl/d higher than projected in last month's STEO and the highest annual average rate of production since 1992.
    •Natural gas working inventories, which reached an all-time weekly record in early November, ended the month at an estimated 3.8 trillion cubic feet (Tcf), almost equal to the level at the same time last year. EIA expects the Henry Hub natural gas spot price, which averaged $4.00 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) in 2011, will average $2.78 per MMBtu in 2012 and $3.68 per MMBtu in 2013.

    eia

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    Weekly Coal Production Data for week ended: December 08, 2012

    Release Date: December 13, 2012 | Next Release: December 20, 2012

    For the week ended December 08, 2012:

    •U.S. coal production totaled approximately 20.0 million short tons (mmst)
    •This production estimate is 1.4 percent lower than last week's estimate and 9.6 percent lower than the production estimate in the comparable week in 2011
    •Coal production east of the Mississippi River totaled 8.5 mmst
    •Coal production west of the Mississippi River totaled 11.5 mmst
    •U.S. year-to-date coal production totaled 960.2 mmst, 6.6 percent lower than the comparable year-to-date coal production in 2011
    •An evaluation of the Weekly Coal Production Report has been done to compare full year 2011 estimates with full year 2011 actual Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) production. It is available under "Coal Production Estimates Evaluation".

    eia

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