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Apple Inc. Message Board

  • warrenbuffett79 warrenbuffett79 Dec 14, 2010 12:44 PM Flag

    Sell Apple and buy RIMM, RIMM is about to breakout!

    Apple is too expensive right now.

    iPhone is not perfect and iPad sucks(check customer reviews before you buy one).

    Sell Apple and buy RIMM, RIMM is about to breakout! RIMM forward P/E is only 8!

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    • Not sure how number of employees is the most important metric. They're pumping a large chunk of tax revenues into the country (lots of foreign dollars coming in, too). They're enabling whole industries to earn more as well, which also creates more tax revenue.

      A smart kid with $99 can become an iOS developer and make some serious money. Hell, the fart app guy (more than one, actually) ended up making millions. I prefer to see that kind of wealth creation than the kind where you chain employees to an assembly line for a lifetime of servitude.

    • They are companies in themselves. AAPL as its own employs few.

    • I'm a part of the US economy. The fact that Apple is doing well means I do well and if I do well, I go out and buy more products, putting more money into our economy. I pay more taxes as well. So Apple's valuation does benefit the US.

      Not to mention, you're ignoring a huge segment of businesses who are directly benefitting from the products Apple has developed. Ask app development shops like Rovio, Tapbots, or Tapulous, who are now multi-million dollar companies, purely from writing iPhone apps originally. Ask the music industry, which was faced with rampant piracy and given a way to turn digital downloads into a genuine revenue stream.

      I disagree that the run "has" to end soon. It will end when Apple fails to continue to execute as they have. Look at the companies that fell into that trap - Motorola, Palm, Dell, and now RIM. You can only coast on past successes so long before someone else comes along and does it better. Apple, more than any other company, has been willing to try to outdo themselves while they have a hit product on their hands. When the iPod took off, they began to develop the iPhone. While everybody was busy trying to copy the iPhone, they were busy finishing up development of the iPad. It's how they stay ahead of everyone else - they never sit back. More than 60% of their revenue now comes from products that didn't exist four years ago. That's a sign of remarkable innovation. I certainly wouldn't bet against a company that can do that over and over.

    • Good for you if you've been that long term of an investor.

      AAPL is not the solution to the US economy though. They are the problem.

      300 Billion dollar valuation and only 42,000 jobs.

      By comparison Bank of America has a market capitalization of 125 Billion, and employs 250,000 people.

      It's a bad company for the US economy to grow.

      You know it!

      I just think the run has to end soon.

      Exponetial growth doesn't exist.

      Dump your shares and invest in something that's going to create Jobs.

    • Ok, I'll leave RIM out of this and give you a little back story.

      I bought my original chunk of Apple shares in 1999, they were actually one of the first three stocks I bought when I opened a Roth IRA (around $33 a share, two splits ago). I've watched the stock careen upward, dip precipitously, and careen upward again. All along the way, I've heard the "Apple is a bubble" argument. Heard it at $100, heard it at $150, heard it at $200, heard it at $250...well, you get the picture.

      Do I think Apple can continue to grow like they have recently? No, probably not. But I also didn't think they could double so fast when they were at $150. And when I look at the markets they're doing well in, they're all growing markets - computers, mobile devices, media streaming, software, tablets, etc. And with the exception of tablets and mp3 the players, the scary thing is Apple still has plenty of room for growth. They're not like Microsoft or Google, stuck with 90% of the only markets they make money in.

      Will Apple pull back at some point? Probably, but certainly not enough to make me worry about dumping my shares. I'd still be taking a huge capital gains hit by selling now. Apple's size doesn't scare me. Their revenues are increasing, they've got no debt, and they're on track to have $100 billion in the bank pretty soon. Their competitive advantages in emerging markets like tablets will only become more evident as the market is flooded with Android tablets of all sizes and people realize the exceptional software is all being written for the iPad first because it's so much easier to develop for and monetize.

      Like I said, been listening to the "Apple can't grow" argument for years. So far, no one's been right about that.

    • I think there is too much money invested in AAPL.

      A 300 Billion dollar valuation is too much.

      I'd say the stock is over-valued by about 100 points.

      Leave the RIMM comparison aside for a second.
      Do you really think AAPL can continue to grow like this?

      The Answer is NO!

      You're in a bubble. There is a reason they call it that!!!!

    • Sorry, you couldn't get me to touch BlackBerry with a ten foot pole right now. Talk about a company in serious decline. Watching Lazaridis fumble through his interview with Walt Mossberg only confirms that they're completely ill-eqipped to compete in this battle.

      http://mobileopportunity.blogspot.com/2010/10/whats-really-wrong-with-blackberry-and.html
      http://www.asymco.com/2010/12/13/verizon-strikes-out/

    • Playbook is 3-4 time faster than iPad when browsing internet and they will have 9" too next year.

      Playbook and QNX is real multi-task, Apple OS sucks and is only good enough for iPhone.

 
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