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American Capital, Ltd. Message Board

  • utherpen34 utherpen34 May 10, 2013 1:36 PM Flag

    ACAS and other stocks

    ACAS looks solid as long as the economy remains relatively stable, so my main concern is the enormous amount of currency that has been and is still being printed by the federal reserve. I fail to see how this much unbacked money can be released into circulation without massive inflation. Even though the government maintains that inflation is in check, a trip to the grocery store exposes this as a falsehood. People on fixed incomes are already having difficulty making ends meet, and I believe it will get much worse. The big question in my mind is how this will affect the stock market.

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    • Its not yet being released into the economy. The banks are holding it. Why?? Because they get a quarter percent for free from the fed for holding it. And with interest rates set to go up in the next two years, if they lend it now, they'll have less to lend out when rates go up.

      • 1 Reply to dsac0430
      • I agree that the banks are holding most of this money. My concern is about when it is released. I am trying to decide on a course of action to take when the inevitable occurs. Some people suggest investing in precious metals, but I lost a small fortune in the silver market and mining stocks during the 1987 crash, so that doesn't appeal to me as a viable alternative. Then there are the consumer oriented stocks like Proctor & Gamble, but their dividends would never keep up with inflation in such an environment. If someone has a plan for the uncertain months ahead, I would be most interested to hear about it. Thanks!

 
ACAS
14.851+0.641(+4.51%)3:32 PMEDT

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