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Clearwire Corporation (CLWRD) Message Board

  • bjspokanimal bjspokanimal May 23, 2012 3:34 PM Flag

    John Saw: 40mhz Channels, 168Mbps Speeds

    "According to Clearwire's CTO John Saw, when that (CLWR) LTE network goes live it will outpace other US services, supporting peak download speeds of 168Mbps because of the high capacity in its 2.5GHz spectrum. This will enable the operator to use LTE-Advanced carrier aggregation to achieve 40MHz channels, twice the size of the largest at Verizon and AT&T."

    Re: the current retail strategy: "He said Clearwire has revamped all its offerings recently and seen "phenomenal" uptake by dealers, as well as mounting a radio and TV advertising campaign in February."

    http://www.rethink-wireless.com/2012/05/14/clearwire-breathes-new-life-retail-business.htm

    S

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    • Actually it appears we are in agreement.

      Capacity and boasting about potential faster speeds.

      Ok...I'm moving on from this thread....

      Good luck spok

    • well did u see they priced the stock dilution at 1.22

    • ... capacity.

      That's why they're deploying LTE where the other carriers need them most to provide them with capacity.

      That's why sprint offers WiMax in unlimited programs to stroke an advantage they have over all the other (capped) programs.

      Like you say, it's about cash flow and subscriber growth and what gets them there... and that's capacity, first and foremost.

      The John Saw comment simply stretches the envelope by saying "yes, you want us for capacity, but you'll get speed options as well that may, in the future, be un-matched".

      Similarly, Honda has good price points, great re-sale value, and economical fuel mileage...

      ... and a formula 1 car, just to show that it's not all about price, re-sale and economical mileage.

      S

    • Is it safe? Will it kill small birds flying in its path? How much radiation will a pop emit?

      I noticed that for neighborhoods they like to put their tower at the local elementary school. I hope it is safe. I can imagine with all CLWRs problems that safety is not the #1 concern. Right now there is controversy in my neighborhood as to how much radiation is emitted from the big pop at the school. No one has provided the answers.

      Would it be permitted in all parts of Europe. If they believe WiFi is bad I can only imagine what they would think of this.

    • I sense you may have become insecure. For a long time no one has really questioned you on your technical claims so now you have become flustered when someone comes along and challenges your assertions. You should welcome any challenges because that’s how you can become better unless you’re afraid of getting caught on some of your assertions.

      On further note to your argument that 1) Clearwire 2.6GHz signal quality has weaknesses in coverage and the fact that UE handsets is always a moving target, therefore the 9:1 configuration cannot be applicable since uplink may get degraded further. 2) In addition, production traffic is usually a mixture of different characteristics, therefore 9:1 cannot be used.

      My response is:

      1) Certainly, the 2.6 Ghz has a weaker penetration quality than the 700 mhz but with a 9:1 and a large spectrum allocation even with a degraded uplink signal quality uploads can still retain its throughput target. Choosing a lower ratio like 3:2 instead of 9:1 would actually be worse on throughput for Cleawire’s delivery capacity since either way signal interference is already there.

      Furthermore, operators (CW customers) would presumably use their own FD-LTE for any uploads since customers are using Clearwire for its intended downlink capacity, not uplink. In addition, any moving devices can actually benefit from a 9:1 configuration (should be at all sites to have maximum gains and to avoid bottlenecks) because the macrocells use by Clearwire have wider coverage of about 20km per cell-tower.

      2) Any production network has mixture of loads. This is not something unique. You cannot jam massive amount of data into the pipe as in first-in-first-out basis for that will throttle the network. Since TD-LTE is mainly used for its downlink capacity where most traffic is originating from the Internet like Youtube and others, operator can use different IP-based tools (i.e. QoS, COS, Tagging, Diff Srv, Bandwidth Rsvr.) in their core network to affect performance and on its “last mile” to use Radio Access Network on (call admission control and RAN Scheduling) to allocate/deallocate signals based on usage quality which can further achieve higher throughput in other areas.

      Further controls can be also placed in the Backhauls and UMTS Bearer Service (Radio Access Bearer and Core Network Bearer) with emphasis on:

      QoS Class Identifier (QCI),
      Allocation and Retention Priority (ARP),
      Maximum Bit Rate (MBR),
      Guaranteed Bit Rate (GBR),
      Aggregate Maximum Bit Rate (AMBR).

      My point is regardless of different kinds of traffic characteristic all network will require optimization and rationalization to make performance and throughput “predictable”.

    • CJ I do not have manners because you perport yourself cloaked in a facade of knowledge that is misleading. That makes you a supreme idiot... intelligent, yes, but only of limited understanding wielded with an intent and as if you have a deeper understanding. So, yes, I am blasting that stance as being charlatan. What's more, I will keep on pointing out where you step out of line. Do the work.. not just the rudimentary work and then engage without the prejudiced bias. Otherwise, man you are a joke and not more.

    • First of all, why do always open your comments with name calling like “idiot”, “nut”, “grow a brain”, ”hey jacko”. Don’t you have any manners?

      TR: “For live networks that vary dynamically, particularly for mobile networks where subscriber units are moving, not fixed modems, the channel usage and conditions vary and allocation should be made to vary dynamically,. The 9:1 ratio fits a condition of video usage from the user under test conditions only. Again, refer to the channel models that depict varying conditions and to reports of real-world usage. The argument for TDD is not that any arbitrary ratio could be used but for the ratio to change dynamically according to signal conditions and usage requirements."

      Clearwire is in the business of selling capacity which means they have to optimize and maximize their resources within the confines of their macrocell setup. Sure, Clearwire can change its downlink/uplink bandwidth dynamically but why would they need to?

      Customers have contracted Clearwire services for the sole purpose of Clearwire's high capacity delivery. After all, Clearwire is in business as a wholesale provider for the largest network capacity in the market.

      For certain requirements such as network management and specialized applications Clearwire can always create a form of "bandwidth reservation" on either channel by tweaking with the UMTS QoS on an individual channel basis such as with traffic flow classification (conversational, streaming, interactive, max and guaranteed bit rate, traffic priority, allocation and retention priority) through technical attributes.

      The 3GPP 9:1 configuration was intended for video-streaming applications, live sport events, HD broadcasts, etc. which is the only reason (IMO) why operators would be requiring Clearwire's service in the first place

      Proof:

      [“Broadcast:

      The variable split between uplink and downlink makes LTE TDD an ideal technology for mobile broadcast applications, such as mobile TV over e.g. MBMS. For broadcast applications the operator may chose to employ nearly the entire unpaired spectrum (in e.g. a 9:1 configuration) to transmit in the downlink direction, i.e. digital mobile TV at high data rates.

      In this manner the unpaired LTE TDD could be used effectively as the broadcast complement to LTE FDD in regions, where both will be licensed. When used as a complement in this manner, operators may capitalize on new revenue streams without adversely impacting quality and speed data services delivered on LTE FDD.”]

      TR: “The trend is for growing usage of mobile devices and applications such as social video sharing, that are more varied on the upside.”

      Consistently, operators have shown an asymmetrical traffic pattern that would require a significant larger capacity on the downlink side. Typically, upload is done only once into the cloud to sites such as Youtube, Facebook, and others. However, that same video file may get downloaded numerous times, perhaps thousands of times. So, in this context your argument doesn’t hold. Besides, a 40 mhz spectrum with a 9:1 ratio there will be an allocation of about 35 mbps to the uplink channel, which is more than enough bandwidth for any uploading into the cloud even with the lowest priority.

    • amen!

    • LOL! You are a nut.

      "I forgot to mentioned that the reason why the TDD 9:1 configuration would be the most ideal configuration to be chosen everywhere is because Clearwire’s strong selling point is “capacity” and 9:1 would be the most efficient configuration for a large file transmission such as (video streaming, HBO on the GO, Netflix) when used with Ipad, smartphones, and tablets." Yuo are saying that a specific user/transmission is used to determine the TDD U/D configuration? Yea, for unloaded channels such as in a test configuration. For live networks that vary dynamically, particularly for mobile networks where subscriber units are moving, not fixed modems, the channel usage and conditions vary and allocation should be made to vary dynamically,. The 9:1 ratio fits a condition of video usage from the user under test conditions only. Again, refer to the channel models that depict varying conditions and to reports of real-world usage. The argument for TDD is not that any arbitrary ratio could be used but for the ratio to change dynamically according to signal conditions and usage requirements.

      The trend is for growing usage of mobile devices and applications such as social video sharing, that are more varied on the upside. This has already caused problems for operators: at sports events, concerts, and other large gatherings, uplink demand has swamped 3G networks to the point of temporary failure. That was because mobile devices were being used to send pictures and video. Even thought the networks are predominantly FDD, the lack of sufficient localized microcell/node off-load and fixed D/U channel size of FDD creates a logjam. Stadiums and similar venues are built to handle high traffic concentrations, other coverage areas see transient concentrations that are more sporadic and unpredictable. This is exacerbated by the inefficiency of the uplink channel due to the low power of signals of small mobile devices.

      CJ_nonobservant, check the facts. You are pulling out facts that are not at issue: A 9:1 or any other ratio that would be 'ideal' for a video transmission is irrelevant to the overall communications link upder normal loading and variances of usage. The trouble with your reference is that video usage in a channel is an isolated observation. The issue of most efficient network deployment model and most efficient and cost effective business model, not isolated channel conditions. If you wish to understand how the isolated conditions can build up to make sense on a larger scale, it takes understanding how traffic varies in a loaded network. That is why the industry has developed standard models which are reported in the various white papers. Even then, the way networks are used is evolving due to the capabilities of devices, applications and social habits.

      The result of all of that is a growing appreciation for the use of TDD, for certain, and also for use of microcell and hybrid networks. Usage experience as well as the theory and network modeling is driving this forward broadly.

    • What's important: the latest sell off was telegraphed ad nauseam. You should have sold, but if you didn't I think (hope) it's of no real consequence. I believe it's now time to buy and as much as we'd like to believe otherwise, there is no actual correlation between a stock's price and a company's earnings or profit margins.

      Price is preordained and controlled by the vampire squid and his ilk, while we who are about to be shorn are herded into the appropriate pens by the "news" outlets and media shills. Place your bets on growth, survivability and sustainability if you're a buy and holder, and manipulation if you're a trader but whatever you do, don't let technology talk be a distraction, making you lose sight, and keeping you from achieving your goals. Remember for the future, in order to make a single red cent at some point you must sell.

      I'm haunted by a former customer who proudly displayed an original thousand share stock certificate in his waiting room, a certificate found stuck in the pages of a book while he and his brother were going through their late mother's estate. At the time AOL was selling for 600/sh and had split several times. As far as I know it's still hanging there, probably wallpapered over by now.

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