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  • xxchicagobadboyxx xxchicagobadboyxx Nov 21, 2007 1:36 PM Flag

    xxchicagobadboyxx's posts

    I'm starting this topic, in order to try to avoid all the foolishness on this board. At this time, many shorts are worried regarding probable rise in this stock, and trying mightily to drive down this stock without I might add much success. Here are some reasons, why this stock may be undervalued.

    NEW YORK, November 20 (newratings.com) - Analyst H Terry of Credit Suisse maintains his "outperform" rating on Google Inc (GOOG.NAS), while raising his estimates for the company. The target price has been raised from $800 to $900.

    In a research note published this morning, the analyst mentions that opportunities in areas such as mobile, display and local would boost Google�s top-line and EPS growth to more than 35% and at least 30%, respectively, over the forthcoming five years. In search, Google is expected to continue to increase its market share until it becomes a monopoly, the analyst says. The DoubleClick acquisition is expected to act as a medium for Google�s successful penetration of the online display advertising business, Credit Suisse adds. The EPS estimate for 2008 has been raised from $18.75 to $18.93.

    http://www.newratings.com/analyst_news/a...

    Google "outperform," target price raised

    Tuesday, November 06, 2007 8:49:16 AM ET
    Bernstein

    NEW YORK, November 6 (newratings.com) - Analysts at Bernstein reiterate their "outperform" rating on Google Inc (GOOG.NAS). The target price has been raised from $720 to $850.

    http://www.newratings.com/analyst_news/a...

    Google "buy"

    Tuesday, November 06, 2007 5:51:26 AM ET
    Stifel Nicolaus

    NEW YORK, November 6 (newratings.com) - In a research note published yesterday, analysts at Stifel Nicolaus & Company reiterate their "buy" rating on Google Inc (GOOG.NAS). The target price is set to $725

    http://www.newratings.com/analyst_news/a...

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    • I know I mentioned this before regarding Utube, both when GOOG was in the 423 range, and again about a week ago. I mentioned how easy it would be to pull up past reruns of the Bachelor, or Jamie Gold's win of $12 million dollars in Poker, and how easy it would be to monetize with an advertizing clip. Currently, Yahoo does this for their news clips.

      Perhaps, it bears repeating again....

      """"""""Google's YouTube video service grows more ubiquitous by the day. Someday Google will find a way to monetize this remarkable asset, just as it did Internet search. ""

      YouTube making money is Google CEO's top aim -CNBC

      http://www.reuters.com/article/technologyNews/idUSN3052022220080430?pageNumber=1&virtualBrandChannel=10001

      Have I mentioned GOOG earnings regarding Doubleclick?

    • WASHINGTON - The Federal Reserve is poised to deliver another interest rate cut to millions of people and businesses this week, although that could be the last break they get for a while.

      ADVERTISEMENT

      Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and his colleagues open a two-day meeting Tuesday afternoon to take a fresh pulse on the economy and decide their next move on interest rates.

      The Fed is widely expected to lower its key interest rate by one-quarter percentage point to 2 percent at the end of its session Wednesday.

      That would mark a modest rate reduction after a recent string of hefty cuts. The Fed is facing a difficult juggling act of trying to shore up the faltering economy while also trying to keep inflation from taking off.

      In response to the Fed's expected action, the prime lending rate for millions of consumers and businesses would fall by a corresponding amount, to 5 percent. The prime rate applies to certain credit cards, home equity lines of credit and other loans. Both rates would be the lowest since late 2004.

      Economists think the Fed may be inclined to leave rates at such low levels possibly through the rest of this year and maybe into next year.

      The Fed started cutting rates last September to aid the economy. Worries, however, have grown that galloping food and energy prices could spread inflation throughout the economy. And that's complicating the Fed's job.

    • FROM THE DAY IN 2004 they issued their "Owners Manual," Google (GOOG: 555.00, +17.21, +3.20%) founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin have been perfectly clear: "Google is not a conventional company. We do not intend to become one."

      They pledged to make no efforts to placate Wall Street and its analysts by "smoothing" quarterly results. They offered no quarterly guidance or efforts to reduce earnings surprises by making profit and revenue forecasts. They wrote: "A management team distracted by a series of short-term targets is as pointless as a dieter stepping on a scale every half hour." They were interested in long-term shareholders, not speculators or traders. So what did they get?

      Speculators and traders.

      After going public in 2004 at just $85 a share in a populist Dutch auction, Google shares nearly hit $750 in November. By mid-March, they were at $412, a stunning drop of $338 a share, or 45%, the steepest in Google's brief history.

      The cause of this wave of selling? An Internet measurement firm, ComScore (SCOR: 21.53, -0.25, -1.14%), began issuing estimates that growth in Google's paid clicks was declining, reaching just 2% in the U.S.

      That's all it took: a mere estimate from a third party most people had never heard of along with vague fears of a looming recession. (For a taste of the negative media frenzy this generated, just search for "Google paid clicks.")

      Good riddance to those fair-weather shareholders who sold on such flimsy evidence.

      The Google faithful never joined the stampede, and I count myself among them. On the contrary, as a long-term shareholder, I used the decline to buy more Google shares, as I exhorted readers to do, most recently on Feb. 5. Last week, Google reported much better-than-expected earnings and said paid clicks actually increased 20%. As Google Chief Executive Eric Schmidt put it, "paid click growth has been much higher than has been speculated by third parties." The stock price leaped $90 on Friday, Google's biggest one-day gain ever. All too predictably, the Wall Street analysts who had put such store in the ComScore reports are now blaming Google for not giving them more guidance — which is exactly what Google has said it won't do.

      I'm not blind to the fact that Google cannot keep growing forever at double-digit rates. But the long-term case for Google isn't based on paid clicks or traditional advertising. Google has created a radical new advertising model in which clicks can be linked directly to purchases. Call this click fulfillment. This is so valuable that I've heard advertisers say they would pay far more for this than they currently do under Google's auction price system. You could argue that it's especially valuable in a recession, when the yield on advertising spending is even more critical.

      Google gained even more market share in Internet search last month. But apart from dominating its core ad search business, Google has other long-term virtues. The migration of advertising to the Internet is still in its infancy.

      Google's acquisition of DoubleClick will enhance its capacity in display advertising and offer advertisers a comprehensive, one-stop approach to Internet ad spending. Google's YouTube video service grows more ubiquitous by the day. Someday Google will find a way to monetize this remarkable asset, just as it did Internet search.

      Even after the price run-up last week, Google shares represent good value. They've gained about 10% since I last recommended them, but if you believe in Google's long-term prospects as I do, and are prepared to stay the course, that 10% will eventually seem insignificant.

      http://www.smartmoney.com/commonsense/index.cfm?story=20080422-google-is-a-buy

    • During the week of April 21, TheStreet.com readers searched for 10 stocks more than any others. Research associate Patrick Schultz makes the Buy, Sell or Hold call on them below, in the order of their popularity.

      1. Google(GOOG - Cramer's Take - Stockpickr): Mr. Google is back and angry in our lack of faith! That earnings report wowed the street (me included) and blasted higher. As discussed here many times, GOOG's valuation drifted into "value pick" territory over the past few months.

      And given its dominate franchise and enviable earnings power, I suggested starting some cautious buying at the $450 price level as it went down to the $420 area. Boy, did that "value" strategy pay off. What now? If you are long, I would hang on for the ride. If you are looking to build a position,
      use any market-related weakness to get in. -- BUY

    • For second year, Google is named world's most powerful brand
      BLOOMBERG NEWS

      Google Inc. ranked as the world's most powerful brand for the second consecutive year, as the company capitalized on its name to sell advertising globally, according to a study by a consulting firm.

      Google, owner of the most popular search engine, topped the third annual ranking from Millward Brown, which surveyed more than 1 million consumers about 50,000 brands, the New York-based consulting company said Monday. Two years ago, when Microsoft Corp. topped the list, Google ranked seventh.

      The company, which got nearly all of its $16.6 billion in 2007 revenue from ads, is leveraging its brand to win more sales in China and other fast-growing economies. Expansion in China helped international revenue account for more than half of sales last quarter, Google said last week. Still, its search engine trails the popularity of Baidu.com Inc. in that country.

      "To be powerful, a brand has to have a strong relationship with its end consumers," Nigel Hollis, Millward Brown's chief global analyst, said in an interview.

      The rankings reflect a company's revenue, the markets in which it competes, consumer attitudes and the brand's expected contribution to future sales, Hollis said. Based on those factors, Google has a brand value of $86.1 billion.

    • April 21 (Bloomberg) -- Google Inc., trailing Baidu.com Inc. in China's online search market, expects to process more local Web queries through mobile phones than computers by 2011, aided by an alliance with the nation's largest wireless carrier.

      ``In some quarters, our mobile traffic will double, whereas it will take perhaps a year to double on the PC side,'' Google's China President Lee Kai-Fu said in a Bloomberg Television interview broadcast today. Mobile-search volume may exceed that from computers in three years, he said.

      Google, which is also developing an operating system for mobile phones, leads Beijing-based Baidu in Chinese wireless searches after gaining exclusive rights to process queries from China Mobile Ltd.'s customers. The Mountain View, California- based company earns less than half its local rival's online advertising sales from Chinese computers.

      ``Google has looked for newer avenues due to the strength of Baidu's position on the Internet side,'' said Jim W. Oberweis, president of Oberweis Asset Management Inc. in Lisle, Illinois, which manages $1.5 billion, including Baidu shares. ``Both Internet-based search as well as mobile search are large potential markets,'' said Oberweis.

      Baidu accounted for 60 percent of China's market for search- based online advertising sales in the fourth quarter, compared with 58 percent a year earlier, according to Beijing-based Analysys International. Google's market share rose to 26 percent from 17 percent, the researcher said.

    • BURLINGAME, CALIF. - Recession? What recession? That was the attitude of many online advertising executives at the Ad:Tech conference in San Francisco last week.

      Though the economic downturn is pummeling magazine, newspaper and television advertising, it's bolstering the digital ad sector as companies shift marketing dollars to the Web in hopes of reaching more consumers. "We're heading for some tough times, and that is a really good thing for us," said conference attendee James Adams, chairman of ADRevolution, an ad targeting firm.

      Indeed, plenty of big advertisers are embracing Web advertising. General Mills (nyse: GIS - news - people ) recently announced that it will spend $1.5 billion--half its annual advertising budget--online. Kimberly-Clark (nyse: KMB - news - people ), home of Kleenex and Huggies brands, has increased its spending on Internet advertising to 26% from 10% of its marketing budget. And McDonald's recently signed on digital ad firm Avenue A/Razorfish in a deal reportedly worth $10 million.

      Proving that the trend is real, Google (nasdaq: GOOG - news - people ), the world's biggest Internet advertising company, reported first-quarter earnings last week that blew past Wall Street's estimates and quelled concerns about its growth.

      The main reason that digital advertising does well when times are tough: It's easier to measure the success of Web ads than TV or print ads. On the Web, advertisers can count the number of times consumers look at or click on their ads. "We constantly hear from our clients that when they're tightening their ad budgets, they look to digital because it's accountable and measurable, and they have a sense of what's working and what's not," said Darin Brown, chief strategy officer at Avenue A/Razorfish.

      The dynamics of the Web also lets advertisers adjust their campaigns quickly. For instance, if an ad on a particular Web site isn't performing well, it can be moved to a different site where it might get more eyeballs.

      Ripple, a company that delivers local ads on flat-screen TVs in public places such as coffee shops and gyms, is a prime example of a digital ad company that helps advertisers measure their online success. Ripple president and co-founder Ali Diab said sales are increasing, in part, because of the company's precise measurement tools--it uses gaze-detection software to show advertisers exactly how many pairs of eyeballs looked at their ad and for how long.

    • Indeed, plenty of big advertisers are embracing Web advertising. General Mills (nyse: GIS - news - people ) recently announced that it will spend $1.5 billion--half its annual advertising budget--online. Kimberly-Clark (nyse: KMB - news - people ), home of Kleenex and Huggies brands, has increased its spending on Internet advertising to 26% from 10% of its marketing budget. And McDonald's recently signed on digital ad firm Avenue A/Razorfish in a deal reportedly worth $10 million.

      Proving that the trend is real, Google (nasdaq: GOOG - news - people ), the world's biggest Internet advertising company, reported first-quarter earnings last week that blew past Wall Street's estimates and quelled concerns about its growth.

      The main reason that digital advertising does well when times are tough: It's easier to measure the success of Web ads than TV or print ads. On the Web, advertisers can count the number of times consumers look at or click on their ads. "We constantly hear from our clients that when they're tightening their ad budgets, they look to digital because it's accountable and measurable, and they have a sense of what's working and what's not," said Darin Brown, chief strategy officer at Avenue A/Razorfish.

      The dynamics of the Web also lets advertisers adjust their campaigns quickly. For instance, if an ad on a particular Web site isn't performing well, it can be moved to a different site where it might get more eyeballs.

      Ripple, a company that delivers local ads on flat-screen TVs in public places such as coffee shops and gyms, is a prime example of a digital ad company that helps advertisers measure their online success. Ripple president and co-founder Ali Diab said sales are increasing, in part, because of the company's precise measurement tools--it uses gaze-detection software to show advertisers exactly how many pairs of eyeballs looked at their ad and for how long.

      Ripple also targets ads to neighborhoods. A local flower shop, for instance, can advertise only on Ripple screens that are within two miles of the store. Advertising with Ripple costs less, too--$15 per thousands pairs of eyeballs compared with $20 to $50 per viewer for a local television spot.

    • http://www.mercurynews.com/business/ci_8982677

      STRONG EARNINGS REPORT RESTORES SEARCH GIANT TO 'MUST-OWN' STATUS

      By Michael Liedtke

      Article Launched: 04/19/2008 01:35:40 AM PDT

      Google's stock soared 20 percent Friday, restoring $28 billion in shareholder wealth as Wall Street renewed its love affair with the Internet search leader after weeks of worry about an online advertising slowdown.

      Driven by stellar first-quarter results that surprised industry analysts, Google shares surged $89.87 to finish at $539.41. It marked the biggest one-day gain since Google's initial public stock offering in August 2004, leaving the shares at their highest closing price since January.

      Google had lost favor with investors as Web surfing data and the faltering U.S. economy raised concerns that people aren't clicking as frequently on the Internet advertising links that generate most of the Mountain View company's revenue.

      The trend threatened to chip away at Google's earnings because the company typically gets paid by the click. Although there were signs of decelerated clicking in the United States, Google more than offset any negative effects by expanding its foreign business and tweaking its online ad system that helped reap more revenue per click.

      The first-quarter performance reinforced the belief that Google is a "must-own stock," American Technology Research analyst Rob Sanderson wrote in a Friday note.

      Dinosaur Securities analyst David Garrity also is convinced that the worst is over for Google's stock, which was down 35 percent in 2008 before the first-quarter earnings changed investor sentiment.

      We think (Google's stock) has seen its 2008 low. Onward and upward," wrote Garrity, who expects the price to hit $750 during the next year.

      Google ended the first quarter with a 60 percent share of the U.S. search market, up from 58 percent at the end of the fourth quarter, according to comScore Media Metrix. Yahoo was in second at a 21 percent share followed by Microsoft at 9 percent.

      The first quarter represented a tipping point in Google's maturation into an international company that's becoming less vulnerable to the ups and downs of the U.S. economy.

      Google collected most of its first-quarter revenue outside the United States, the first time that has happened in the company's 9 1/2-year history.

      Besides diversifying its business, the higher international revenue should also help boost Google's profit because it should keep the company's tax rate slightly lower than it has been in past years.

    • Note that Google trades at 50 times earnings, or 34 times 2008 earnings, while Chinese Google, or Baidu trades at 80 times 2008 earnings and is still rising.

      C. Ming Zhao, an analyst with Susquehanna Financial, said that Baidu is a stock worth buying and holding for several years. He concedes that it could continue to be volatile in the short-term, especially since it trades at nearly 80 times 2008 earnings estimates.

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