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SBC Communications Inc. (SBC) Message Board

  • coldspringmimosa coldspringmimosa May 26, 2004 2:36 AM Flag

    MCI Shows World's Fastest IP Net Connec

    May 26, 2004


    MCI Demonstrates World's Fastest IP Network Connection

    World's First 40 Gigabits Per Second Throughput is Four Times
    Faster Than Current State-of-the-Art IP Networks

    ASHBURN, Va., May 25 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- MCI (MCIA.PK) today
    announced that through utilizing its optical network it has achieved the
    world's fastest Internet Protocol (IP) transmission ever. This technology
    trial highlights how next-generation technology will address the emerging
    needs of carriers and service providers to deliver converged IP services, such
    as data, voice, video as well as multimedia applications to customers of all
    sizes.
    As MCI continues to execute on its IP convergence strategy, the 40
    gigabits per second (Gbps) trial signifies a strategic milestone in the
    evolution of IP networking. It is also a tangible example of MCI's commitment
    to implementing next-generation technology to enable an all-IP future for its
    customers.
    "MCI continues its strong leadership position by hosting this industry
    first 40 Gbps trial over the MCI global IP network," said Jack Wimmer, MCI
    vice president of Network Architecture and Advanced Technology.
    "Today the promise of high-capacity Internet technology took another big
    step forward," said Wimmer. "With the rapid growth of broadband access and
    the continuing need to deliver advanced capabilities to businesses, 40 Gbps
    technology will enable MCI to cost-efficiently meet greater customer demand.
    The advancement today confirms the viability of 40 Gbps technology."
    The technology trial took place over MCI's optical fiber network between
    points-of-presence (PoPs) located in San Francisco and San Jose, Calif.
    carrying 40Gbps of traffic over a single full-duplex Optical Carrier (OC)-768c
    interface. Two IP routers were connected across the MCI network via a
    wavelength utilizing StrataLight's OTS-4000 Optical Terminal Subsystem.
    "MCI has always engineered our network with the future in mind," said
    Wimmer. "With our previously announced deployment of an Ultra-long haul Dense
    Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) transport network, MCI is preparing
    our network for the 40 Gbps evolution."
    As an industry leader in the delivery of IP services, one of MCI's
    objectives is to use its vast global network to enable customers to create,
    store, deliver and manage their digital media and to deploy applications that
    simplify, secure and transform their businesses. Forty (40) Gbps technology
    enables maximum service flexibility without compromising performance, and sets
    the stage for MCI to introduce bandwidth-intensive IP-based business
    applications like web services, multimedia content distribution, grid
    computing, real-time imaging and storage networking.
    Through 40 Gbps technology, customers will be able to send larger streams
    of content and other applications important to their business across the
    network in just fractions of a second. For example, with 40 Gbps networking
    MCI could multicast approximately 2000 High Definition TV (HDTV) video streams
    simultaneously -- four-times faster than today's fastest connection.

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    • By: chiraven
      Date: 05/26/04 04:37 pm

      I guess we're all set to handle those OC-768's OK then. You are absolutely right about the big need being in the local loop. It won't help SBC to be able to handle 2000 simultaneous HDTV transmissions on one circuit if they can't get those transmissions to the sub's premises.
      ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
      I take it you are saying that SBC does not have fiber between its C.O.s. Being retired AT&T I know that there is fiber between AT&T and SBC. I also know that AT&T has been up grading its fiber at a very fast pace. Fibers that used to carry one OC-3 now carry many OC-192s (it could be higher than that now). Where they once used white light, it is now broken up into colors with each color carrying a different channel. The only way you would need to carry 2000 HDTV channels is if there are 2000 different channels.

    • >The only place where fiber is needed is from the C.O. to the customer prem (homes).


      I guess we're all set to handle those OC-768's OK then. You are absolutely right about the big need being in the local loop. It won't help SBC to be able to handle 2000 simultaneous HDTV transmissions on one circuit if they can't get those transmissions to the sub's premises.

      Actually, HDTV may just be the app that drives FTTP. Adding megabit internet to that would be virtually free once the fiber and routers are in place.

    • By: chiraven
      Date: 05/26/04 03:53 pm

      The real cost is in the cable placement, and in the electronics in which the fibers terminate. That being the case, why not lay bigger cables?
      ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
      AT&T has 28 fibers between Dallas and Pheonix, six of which are spares. Most of the east west trafic rides those fibers and there is lots of spare capacity. That being the case, were is the need for 166 fibers and space to add twice that many. AT&T bought those 166 fibers from a Company that bought PF.net. The fibers use AT&T right-of-way so buying them at a fraction of the cost made sense, but they are dark and will probably stay that way for some time to come. The only place where fiber is needed is from the C.O. to the customer prem (homes).

    • >I could not understand why so many companies were wanting to lay 100s of fibers
      >in the ground when the capacity of one pair of fibers has been doubling ever few months.

      Fiber cable is cheap. heck, I've got a couple hundred feet of some multi-strand (not sure how many fibers in the cable right now) in my storage locker, just waiting for me to do something with it.

      The real cost is in the cable placement, and in the electronics in which the fibers terminate. That being the case, why not lay bigger cables?

    • By: ed_zorn@sbcglobal.net

      Thats not exactly correct. A t3 is an electricial signal on copper that runs atabout 45MBS, A STS1, or OC1 is an opticial signal which is compliant with SONET and runs at approx. 55MBS.
      ----------------------------------------------
      What's 10 MBS amoung friends. LOL I know of some 56 kbs circuits out there that would run over 1200 baud but no one sells them that small anymore. I could not understand why so many companies were wanting to lay 100s of fibers in the ground when the capacity of one pair of fibers has been doubling ever few months.

    • ed_zorn@sbcglobal.net ed_zorn May 26, 2004 3:26 PM Flag

      Thats not exactly correct. A t3 is an electricial signal on copper that runs atabout 45MBS, A STS1, or OC1 is an opticial signal which is compliant with SONET and runs at approx. 55MBS.

    • >Shoot, I started out working on 1200 baud. LOL

      When I started we were delighted to move up from the 110 to 300 TTY units. It also helped that teh 300's were ASR instead of just KSR. (That means they had punched paper tape capabilities. I had a whole bunch of my FORTRAN programs saved on rolled-up paper tapes in little plastic boxes in my desk drawer.)

    • MCI would need to come up with new technology. Having just come out of Chapter 11, and having lied to dump all it's debt, and after having the largest bankruptcy and layoffs in World History, they need a boost. I wonder if the rbocs are still trying to sue MCI for all the lost revenue? I thought that MIC (worldcom) owed SBC about 6 billion? For all the back payments on the pipes for 3 years?


      Bernie Ebbers, the "captian of that ship" during it's massive fraud, is responsible for the telecom industry laying off 750,000 workers. How would you like to be responsible for 30% of the jobs lost during the market downturn? When will they take Bernie away in handcuffs?

    • >concatenated

      Thanks.

    • concatenated

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