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Polymet Mining Corp. Message Board

  • dkwilk dkwilk Oct 5, 2013 12:30 PM Flag

    PolyMet study: Water from mine site would need 500 years of treatment

    Google this subject, it is a article appearing in todays Duluth herald.. don

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    • You must be some kind of funny guy. If you have something to say about Polymet then say it! Quit acting like a moron.

    • They knew this #$%$ 15 years ago when PLM starting this process. Why would they let PLM go on this long and waste all of there money. Who cares about waste 500 years from now by than if we are still exist someone will figure out how to clean it up. How much raw sewage does Duluth dump into lake Superior every time we get a hard rain? Answer enough to close the beaches.

    • i guess a bunch of left wing nut jobs running that paper

    • Sorry it is the Duluth Tribune..don

      • 1 Reply to dkwilk
      • tr (dot) im/4hnkw

        PolyMet study: Water from mine site would need 500 years of treatment

        If the PolyMet copper-nickel mine is built and operates north of Hoyt Lakes, water that runs off the site will have to be treated for hundreds of years or more to remove sulfate and metals to meet water quality regulations.

        By: John Myers, Duluth News Tribune

        If the PolyMet copper-nickel mine is built and operates north of Hoyt Lakes, water that runs off the site will have to be treated for hundreds of years or more to remove sulfate and metals to meet water quality regulations.

        That’s not a doomsday prediction by environmental radicals. It was written in the Preliminary Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement by EMR, the company PolyMet hired to develop a workable mine plan.

        “For purposes of this SDEIS, the #$%$ (wastewater treatment facility) is considered a permanent facility and would be discharging treated effluent for perpetuity,” EMR concluded in the original document given to government agencies in May.

        Since then, PolyMet and regulating agencies have moved to tweak the language, with a more recent version saying water treatment will be needed to meet water quality regulations for a “minimum of 500 years” but “not necessarily perpetual.”

        Either way, critics say, Minnesota is entering uncharted territory, possibly approving an industrial project that would require pollution treatment forever after about 20 years of economic impact. They wonder if PolyMet will still exist as a company hundreds of years after the mine is no longer producing copper and income, and even if they are still here, if enough money can be set aside to pay for long-term treatment.

        Critics are most concerned about sulfate and heavy metals that the acidic runoff will leach from waste rock in levels that, without treatment, would fail Clean Water Act rules and threaten connected waterways like the St. Louis River and Lake Superior.

 
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