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General Electric Company Message Board

  • nitwitindotcom nitwitindotcom Jul 4, 2001 2:25 PM Flag

    Three cheers for EU

    We stupid american consumers like to pay high for everything from lightbulbs to gas because it will make our stock go up>>>>>forget about paying high bills ---for the sake of our stock goes up.
    lets just have one big company then we wont have to choose where to buy airplanes
    one car that runs on one gas

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    • You wrote: "But a key point to all this is that it is virtually impossible to challenge legally possible anti-competitive company practices in europe after a merger/acquisition has occured. This is in big contrast to the U.S legal system. We should not forget this point".

      If one pre-judges by crafting a trial of intent, then no merger should ever be approved.

      The anti-competitive argument is a reflection of the anti-capitalistic attitude of the EU socialist elite. The french are notorious mercantilic freaks, the only thing they are concerned about is to have a trade surplus, even if it means having unfair trade practices and 16% unemployment, and their economy is in a permanent funk as a result. Free trade is anathema to them, and the rest of the EU is slowly embracing their flawed policies.

    • We should not forget that it was rejected on the basis of the concessions GE had submitted. GE could have made the deal happen by publically selling 19.9% of GECAS. But they don't want this so no approval.

      Why were they willing to sell a private stake with preferred stock to a financial investor but not a stake with common stock? It was GE's choice.

      BV

    • I think they wouldn't have lobbied the EU if they hadn't (a vested interest). And the EU listened where as the DOJ didn't.

      But a key point to all this is that it is virtually impossible to challenge legally possible anti-competitive company practices in europe after a merger/acquisition has occured. This is in big contrast to the U.S legal system. We should not forget this point.

      BV

    • Well said mischa.

      Also VAT is not 26% - in some countries it just feels like it.

    • NOT TRUE.

      Lots of companies feared this merger, but only in the EU did they find the sympathetic ear of Mr. Mariole.

    • ABSOLUTELY.

    • It is true that companies dislike competition.
      Following the merger, if GE had been able to decrease the price of a light bulb and still make the same profit, Philips and Osram would have to cut their prices accordingly, but the only way they could do it would be by lowering their profit. No wonder american and european companies had a vested interest in defeating this deal and had no trouble convincing a sympathetic Mariole.

    • ANTI-COMPETITIVE, what's that!

      Do you only know how many companies you need to generate competition?

      The answer is ONE.

      Surprised? Think about it.

    • Yep, the more expensive one - kind of "you get what you pay for" mentality!!!! I think the message is that the EU rejected the merger - doesn't matter who testified against it - they had the authority to accept or reject - regardless of whether or not it was European or American companies against it.

    • >>Buy the better GE lightbulb -- it lasts a very long time!!!<<
      You mean the more expensive one, which compares to the original complaint about expensive light bulbs in Europe.

      >>Also, the US companies that testified
      against the merger, do you think they might have had a vested interest?????? <<
      Of course - the point I'm making is - everyone is complaining that only Europeans were against this deal.

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