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Linn Energy, LLC (LINE) Message Board

  • sirito5 sirito5 Sep 28, 2009 10:26 AM Flag

    Why the big drop??

    Massive selling and volume here? What's the news???

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    • "IF you all don't watch out, these liberal greenies will some day make toilet paper a bad thing for the environment that needs to be outlawed and you will all be wiping your butts with your hand. "

      actually, I believe the koran says to use three pebbles.

    • I'd agree with your argument that there is little environmental impact IF (a) use of the newly grown trees didnt' require the use of harmful chemicals and (b) actually only used trees from tree farms. While you stated that all the paper products came from these farms (which i acknowledge is a very good thing)---i found a link that disputed your contention and stated that only half of the trees used came from these farms (much of which came from areas outside of US and Canada).


      Is it a huge earth-shattering problem as the tree huggers say? Nope. Is it a complete non-issue as you say? Nope.

      As usual, the truth is somewhere in the middle.

    • I never stated that pulp wood was grown on tree farms. What I said was pulp wood in harvested like a crop, regrown and reharvested.

      Pulpwood isn't good for anything else but paper making. Pulpwood trees are fast growing and have a short life span. They grow to maturity in about 30 to 40 years. Pulpwood trees are very soft. The lumber is very weak and can not be used for building. It has very poor fulewood value and it burns very fast.

      Pulpwood is, to a great degree, harvested in naturally growing forests, with proper selective cutting techniques. Pulpwood species such as aspen and poplar, regrow naturally through the root system that is left after the mature tree is harvested. It can also be replanted by man such as done on a tree farm.

      Proper forest management techniques are used to cull out the fast growing pulp wood trees so that the more desireable, slow growing hard wood varieties can thrive without competition from the less desireable pulp wood varieties.

      Both state and federal government agencies promote good forest management practices to effectively manage forests on state and federal lands. The result is forests that produce more efficiently than if they were to be left to grow without intervention by man.

      It is irrelevant where pulp wood comes from, the important fact is that it is a very useful and renewal resource, and all this Blah Blah Blah from the tree huggers is much to do about nothing.

      Forrest products are a valuable renewable resource which is being managed in a very efficient manner. Industry has found many ways of recycling scrap wood and turning it into stronger, cheaper, and more energy efficient building materials for home building.

      To make such a big deal about pulp wood going into paper products is waste of effort that could be better directed at South American countries that are engaged in the wholesale cutting down the rain forests. We don't do that sort of thing in the U.S. Our forests are managed in a method that is sustainable from now and long into the distant future.

      Yes, there was a time in the history of this country, until the middle of the 1900's, when this country was also cutting down the forests without regard to it's sustainablity. That dosen't happen any longer and all those forests that were cut down long ago are now regrown and supplying forest products for today and future generations to come.

      You don't have to worry about the trees in the U.S. and Canada. Our forests are well protected and cared for in a manner that is sustainable.

    • This article talks about additional issues related to TP, etc.

      http://ecolibris.blogspot.com/2009/02/trees-of-soft-toilet-paper-what-do-you.html

      Says only half of the pulp comes from tree farms.

      Who's correct?

    • Interesting perspective. I'd like to confirm whether their use of the trees is indeed matched by the growth of new trees. Even fast growing trees take well over a decade to get to maturity. Still seems like a huge waste of resources.

      What is the harm to recycle the paper we've already grown? Isn't it better to reuse our waste instead of creating more?

      "They would be better off focusing on issues like the federal government loaning half a billion dollars to company that Al Gore has a financial interest in that is going to make electric sports cars that cost 100K. Now isn't that a great use of our tax dolars."

      I've seen that. Keep in mind that this type of investment has the potential to create efficient batteries and other advancements that can help all sorts of vehicles, not just sports cars. We'll know whether this was a good investment after they've created the product. Just like investing billions in the space program has yielded countless advancements that you and I enjoy every day.



      And don't act as though the republicans don't do the similar things. Each side has its own priorities and federal funds will flow to those priorities when they're in office. Think Halliburton. And think of the energy policy crafted by the GWB administration that solely benefitted the likes of Enron and similar theives.

      If you aren't appauled by both sides, you're either blindly partisian or just aren't paying attention.

    • I read the article, and the tree huggers have it all wrong.

      IN the first place the numbers of trees they are talking about saving if we switched to recycled products is a drop in the bucket compared to the number of trees in the northern tier of the US and Canada.

      Secondly; the type of trees harvested for paper making are fast growing varieties such as aspen and birch. They do not use hardwood species for making pulp for paper.

      Thirdly, the trees harvested are grown, harvested and regrown time after time, just like corn crops. They dont cut down forest of valuable timber to make paper.

      And finally, there is an entire segment of our population that works in the timber industry, and who depend on their livelyhood in the forest products industry. If we stop using trees for puplwood many additional people will end up on the unemployment lines.

      This argument about recycled paper products is much to do about nothing. The greenies like to make a mountain out of a mole hill.

      They would be better off focusing on issues like the federal government loaning half a billion dollars to company that Al Gore has a financial interest in that is going to make electric sports cars that cost 100K. Now isn't that a great use of our tax dolars.

      Read it and weep

      http://online.wsj.com/article/SB125383160812639013.html

    • Did you read the article? They're asking that TP, napkins and other related paper products use RECYCLED paper.

      They're not trying to ban it.

      As I said: Partisan pant pissing

    • The attack on toilet paper has already begun:
      http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12318915/

      Don't worry though, dollar bills can be washed, due to their high cotton content, and reused.

    • Interesting. Well, i support this administration and I'm invested in LINE. So there goes your theory. Faith in any administration won't do anything for your portfolio. Partisan pant-pissing won't either.


      "IF you all don't watch out, these liberal greenies will some day make toilet paper a bad thing for the environment that needs to be outlawed and you will all be wiping your butts with your hand."

      Read that aloud to yourself. Now answer this: Can you actually TASTE the stupid?

    • A hundred should have gone to jail in the bush administration.

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