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Linn Energy, LLC (LINE) Message Board

  • norrishappy norrishappy Apr 8, 2013 8:13 PM Flag

    Blooperberg does the right thing on the editorial page for Ethanol corruption. Ethanol Has Its Place, but Not in Gasoline

    "Rather than require blenders to mix a fixed quantity of ethanol into gasoline, the EPA should let them use the amount needed to maintain a 10 percent mix and abandon plans to require a 15 percent blend. If gasoline consumption keeps falling, consumers should be able to benefit from lower prices.
    Better yet, Congress should end the outdated mandate altogether.
    Ethanol may have its place. It can help gasoline burn more efficiently in older car engines, and is less toxic than the alternatives used to boost fuel octane ratings. Those advantages shouldn’t be compromised by a rigid rule that contributes to higher gasoline prices."

    By older cars they mean antique more than 20 years old.

    The oxygen in the MTBE (and ethanol) molecules can substantially reduce CO emissions in vehicles without modern closed-loop fuel-injection systems, which were introduced ­starting in the '80s.

    Read more: E15 and Engines - Can Ethanol Damage my Engine - Popular Mechanics

    Fine if Obama wants to blame it on Bush. But Americans expect men; mature responsible adults, to correct problems not spend all say playing Joe cool. I give Blooperberg some credit for the editorial. But the way it was constructed with the objective information at the end was still cowardly. They also need to get a hold of their ethanol writer and clean up the bogus misinformation included in the copy taken from the crony capitalist ethanol pushers.

    Lady Thatcher we need you now.

 
LINE
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