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  • wngr123 wngr123 Dec 6, 2012 9:12 PM Flag

    Michigan: A Right to Work State

    The Detroit News is reporting that the MI House and Senate has passed 2 of 3 bills that will make MI a right-to-work state. They are currently debating the third.

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    • Her is who makes your cars. Get on youtube and search on this:
      "Detroit Auto Workers Busted on the Job Drinking Beer & Smoking Pot on Break"

    • Loving today!!!

      This tough little nerd just earned his pay!! Brilliant, gutsy, and right for Michigan...wow...who saw this coming?

      Next ...Ohio and Illinois.....they will have no choice....unions are dead.

    • Unions ended sweat shops, demanded decent working conditions and allowed members to have the money to buy houses, cars and other things that drove the economy. More importantly, they are the only voice, of any substance, to stand up to corporations and their skewing of laws. Who else is going to fight against air pollution, stopping free speech, censorship, individual rights verses corporate interests? No, making Michigan a "right to work" state benefits the corporations way more than it benefits those who choose not to pay union dues. P.S. I never belonged to a union.

      • 1 Reply to jpaulgettytoo
      • "Unions ended sweat shops, demanded decent working conditions "
        There are laws to cover these concerns. Unions aren't necessary for that any more.

        "and allowed members to have the money to buy houses, cars and other things that drove the economy."
        Members got too much too fast and caused irreparable harm.

        "More importantly, they are the only voice, of any substance, to stand up to corporations and their skewing of laws."
        Baloney - not necessary when lawyers are so plentiful!

        Unions ONCE had a place - really not needed any more, in any way...

        Sentiment: Buy

    • sdmiller4747@sbcglobal.net sdmiller4747 Dec 8, 2012 10:48 PM Flag

      Now that Michigan is a right to work state like my Arkansas,the wife and I were thinking about relocating to Michigan. It gets REAL HOT down here in the summers and wheez like to get away from dhat.

    • Could it be the first steps necessary to do away with UAW?
      For years many of us have advocated the need for GM to pack up and leave.. Go places, states and countries where their business wold be welcome. Tenn. Carolina, Alabama and many other states have opened their doors,hearts and pocketbooks for all comers. They have welcome foreign manufacturers, they would certainly extend the same to GM if GM ever wanted to move to those locations.
      Unfortunately GM has too much infrastructure in Michigan, beginning with the corporate offices. It is not as easy as packing up and leaving and walking away from billion Dollars worth of facilities and plants. SO they stay.

      If they can pass a bill to make MI a Right to Work State, I am sure that paves the way for GM to make a play to do away with UAW. That I would like to see.

      If UAW doesn't like that, that is OK too. Many jobless would love to relocate and take those jobs and also take advantage of depressed housing market. It would be a win win for everyone.

      • 4 Replies to mallen1998
      • Right to work does not do away with unions. It returns a right back to the individual, he does not have to join a union if he doesn't want to.
        What right to work does do is creates violence. Union people are violent. If you don't join their union 'violence may fall on your head'.
        Violence is and has always been an organizing tool of the unions.
        ---anretired ex union organizer.

      • "If they can pass a bill to make MI a Right to Work State, I am sure that paves the way for GM to make a play to do away with UAW. That I would like to see."

        The bill has passed throught the Michigan House and Senate - it will be on the govenor's desk by Tuesday for signature. The UAW, and other unions, are going to be scrambling to recover from this setback. It all becomes "real" when represented workers invoke their right to NOT pay union dues, for many good reasons, and essentially walk away from the stranglehold that many have had to struggle with.

        All in good time. I'm waiting for "numbers" of how fast workers stop paying dues. That sure the heck won't come from the Unions themselves! I also wonder if unions, at least for awhile, will "claim" those that have stopped paying dues in their ranks as "represented". For example, a union shop where 150 workers are currently represented, suddenly loses 30-40 paying dues. Will the union, because there are still 150 workers in that shop under a contract that was negotiated, still claim all 150 as "theirs"?!?!?!?

        Roll up all the local and their numbers into a region to show that they still represent essentially an unchanged level of members?

        I think the numbers will only come from within the ranks of those who have left. Any ideas on how these numbers will be made visible? I want to see the strength of numbers slowly (but quickly at first) but surely get skinny! And I want those numbers made very visible to the public!

        Sentiment: Buy

      • Best thing is vote your governor out of office---middle class needs unions and fair pay.ill always fight for workers rights, and unions.to much greed from republicans.

      • Right to work does not do away with unions. It returns the right to an individual not to have to pay into a union unless he want to.
        It is time for someone to start returning some rights back to the individual.

 
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