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  • docjoe999 docjoe999 Jul 18, 2009 5:05 PM Flag

    Peter Schiff

    <You complain too much!>

    Nothing is more boring than a doctor complaining about how rough he has it.

    But I think it is worth noting that I and doctors like me have given up the high of caring for others, the prestige, six figure incomes and decades of training to leave patient care system because the system was so mentally and physically unhealthy to health care providers. Since I have quit, I no longer view myself as complaining but informing.

    And it's not just medicine. I read an interesting article in the WSJ about a PhD who left office work to repair motorcycles. One aspect he described that was fascinating was his having gotten an education and then being sucked into the group think of politically correct corporate America where you leave your intelligence at the door. He stated he used his mind much more repairing motorcycles than with his office work.

    I mentioned a lawsuit I was involved in and again nothing could be more boring than my being outraged about it. Suffice it to say that a patient I cared for was shipped to a hospital and six doctors did the PC thing. Once one of the made a diagnosis, none of them disagreed with it because missing a fatal diagnosis was less important than hurting another provider's feelings.

    And while I know people realize that lawyers go after "deep pockets", I don't think they realize that in essence what they are saying is money is more important in a civil case than punishing those who actually did wrong.

    It's the equivalent of jailing a random set of black teens whenever there is a murder. That people could so vehemently believe that such a system protects them blows my mind.

    But that is not the worst part. No, the outrageous part of the lawsuit is that it does not address what actually happened to the poor person who died. The plaintiff's case is so far off the mark that it is the equivalent of saying, "If he had chicken instead of beef for dinner, we feel he would be alive." And our side will argue the merits of beef, and I will contemplate performing the equivalent of harakiri.

    That no one outside of God and myself truly knows what mistakes were made is common. It took me days of research to come up with a theory that fit what happened. Most people are content with a PC version of events than what actually happened.

    The rule in lawsuits is to say as little as possible. If I present my information, the plaintiff's side will try to blame said mistakes on me.

    And those in the medical profession will and have attacked me on the grounds of hubris. Presenting the truth guarantees a personal counter attack towards me.

    Nope, the safest plan is to go on about how great beef is.

    The fickle public does not want to believe that their health care and legal systems could be so corrupted. The PC folks have told them that they have the best legal and medical system in the world, and the public wants to believe it.

    So in the end, the only wise course left to me is to believe God has a plan while the bodies pile up. That juries are rejecting malpractice cases in record numbers, and good doctors are rejecting working such a crazed system is uplifting to me. Instead of the AMA projecting doctor shortages, they really do exist today. And there is finally, finally real progress being put forth by our government to reform the system.

    I may not agree with all the solutions, but at least we have passed the first step admitting we have a problem. The delusion of everything being okay is now gone.

 
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