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Sprint Corporation Message Board

  • bjspokanimal bjspokanimal Nov 15, 2011 1:26 PM Flag

    Apple has Committed to Clearwire's TD-LTE

    The 3rd to the last paragraph in this piece spells out Apple's promise to China Mobile, which is the planet's biggest wireless carrier and in close collaboration with Clearwire for the development of TD-LTE on 2.5ghz frequencies:

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/11/15/chinamobile-4g-idUSL3E7MF0R420111115?type=companyNews&feedType=RSS&feedName=companyNews&rpc=43

    It's beginning to appear as though TD-LTE could run away from FD-LTE as quickly in the future as FD-LTE has run away from WiMax in the past...

    ... and sprint is using FD-LTE for network vision pretty much as a "me too" approach to competing with Verizon and AT&T.

    The use of FD-LTE by sprint is not entirely yet another screw-up by Dangerous Dan Hesse. Sprint has precious little frequency to accomodate a powerful solution like TD-LTE and has to get something out the door with the spectrum that it has...

    ... but Clearwire can pump out TD-LTE on fat spectrum channels at 100-megabit speeds to it's 133 million potential customers (POPs) on just a $600 million upgrade to it's infrastructure.

    The fact that Dan Hesse hasn't agreed to launching that upgrade with sprint's 54%-owned subsidiary yet is bizarre... what are we waiting for?... where is the leadership?

    S

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    • ... first of all, Ericsson already emulated Clearwire's Phoenix test network in Sweden (TD plus 20x20 channels at 2.5Ghz) but did it with LTE-Advanced... at over 100 megabit speeds. ...China Mobile is driving adaptation of TD-LTE devices by device makers.
      ---------------------------
      Clearwire said they were going to deploy Advanced LTE with chunks of 20 MHz spectrum per site. Backhaul will be updated accordingly. Don't think they are planning a 100 megabit deployment. Remember that Phoenix has very dry air and is a desert with little foliage and the tests probably were line of sight out in the open.


      There is no question that now is the time to do with Clearwire's assets what CAN'T be done with Sprint's.
      -----------------------------------
      It maybe that Clearwire still has to deploy a denser tower grid with more pico and femto cells to get the quality of coverage needed to make a big difference to the Sprint smartphone user. If the LTE link is constantly acquiring and losing link while the user is moving around, then maybe its time has not come.

      . MetroPCS is approaching Clearwire for inner-city capacity for exactly the same reason that Sprint needs clearwire in those geographies.
      -----------------------------------------
      Sprint has the WiMax network to alleviate strain. I'm thinking its not doing a very good job of relieving the strain because of difficulties with the 2.5 GHz coverage.

      So, not only can Clearwire augment sprint capacity in those areas... clearwire could also run at 10 times the speeds in those areas...
      --------------------------------------------------
      My impression was that an LTE overlay in high traffic areas would add an equal amount of capacity that WiMax already has. Clearwire did not say the 600 million will get 100 mbit/sec links

      I would agree with your "handover"argument except for the fact that China Mobile is going to be driving the solutions for those issues.
      ----------------------------------------------
      China mobile will not have a FDD-LTE network that needs to integrate with a TDD-LTE network so it is a non-issue for them.

      Regarding another of your points, Sprint's capacity is going to fill up a. Clearwire's service wouldn't "compete" with sprints, as you insinuate... it would clearly "augment" it.
      ---------------------------------------------
      Don't think a 100 megabit option is important to a smartphone.
      100 megabits translates to 45 GBytes/hour. Sprint does not want its users to use 45 GBytes/hour

      tactical advantage via "time-to-market" expertise. In that regard, I will state that WiMax was a good, action-oriented idea that failed... not because it wasn't a good idea but because LTE progressed to quickly after the decision was made...
      -----------------------------------
      I believe that WiMax is a toy that most Sprint users do not make much use of. I believe Clearwires LTE will be more of the same.

      ... Hesse can't dwell on the WiMax/FD-LTE issue to the extent that it renders him unable to make an action-oriented decision that could .
      -----------------------------------------------
      I think Mr Hesse will make the correct decision.

      Clearwire build a WiMax network to meet substantial service requirements for its spectrum.

      Clearwire said they achieved those goals.

      Some markets only deployed a token number of towers to initiate service but left the area under covered.

      I have reservations how well the Clearwire LTE overlay would work out. I think what would happen is that Clearwire would shift some of their WiMax retail customers over to LTE and that would free up capacity for Sprint on the WiMax network.


      Again, good post, pac... good discussion.

      Spok

    • ... first of all, Ericsson already emulated Clearwire's Phoenix test network in Sweden (TD plus 20x20 channels at 2.5Ghz) but did it with LTE-Advanced... at over 100 megabit speeds. The $600 million would be applied to the CLWR upgrade during a time period when LTE-Advanced comes to fruition and China Mobile is driving adaptation of TD-LTE devices by device makers.

      There is no question that now is the time to do with Clearwire's assets what CAN'T be done with Sprint's. The technology is coming together for 2012 but Dan Hesse is still bickering and delaying the decision to move on it.

      If you look at the slides... the New York coverage map, for example, you'll see that Clearwire covers the area on the map where Sprint's capacity would be most strained. MetroPCS is approaching Clearwire for inner-city capacity for exactly the same reason that Sprint needs clearwire in those geographies.

      So, not only can Clearwire augment sprint capacity in those areas... clearwire could also run at 10 times the speeds in those areas... areas where business users would most value that kind of advantage over VZ, AT&T and sprint's slower FD-LTE service.

      I would agree with your "handover"argument except for the fact that China Mobile is going to be driving the solutions for those issues.

      Regarding another of your points, Sprint's capacity is going to fill up a lot faster if sprint's users have a 100 megabit option in many service locations. Clearwire's service wouldn't "compete" with sprints, as you insinuate... it would clearly "augment" it.

      I don't believe sprint will abandon Clearwire either. The problem is, Dan Hesse knows NOTHING about achieving a tactical advantage via "time-to-market" expertise. In that regard, I will state that WiMax was a good, action-oriented idea that failed... not because it wasn't a good idea but because LTE progressed to quickly after the decision was made...

      ... Hesse can't dwell on the WiMax/FD-LTE issue to the extent that it renders him unable to make an action-oriented decision that could give him a substantial, and lasting, advantage over Verizon. He's a deer staring at headlights right now and SOMEBODY has to snap him out of it and show him what action-oriented companies DO.

      Again, good post, pac... good discussion.

      Spok

    • Clearwire is an independent company. Sign up with ATT or VZ - like lightsquared has done with Sprint and build the network. Then resell capacity to willing buyers.

      Why are you trying to squeeze only Sprint for that money.

      There are also other partners: TWC, GOOG, INTC, Comcast - all of whom have the ability to drop a couple of billion without noticing the change in their bank balances.

      Maybe you could start harassing the TWC, GOOG, INTC, CMCSA, T, VZ and VOD boards. All of those guys have far more money.

      Heck you could go to lightsquared and tell them to use your spectrum and share in the spoils.

      • 2 Replies to seeker01238
      • ... out there but because most of Clearwire's subscriber base is wholesale business through sprint, Other potential Clearwire wholesale partners are hesitant to commit until sprint makes it clear that it will support and grow it's wholesale business with clearwire.

        Clearwire's growth via sprint means Clearwire becomes EBITDA positive next year. If sprint abandons Clearwire, Clearwire goes bankrupt... it's as simple as that.

        So, if you were Comcast, or dish, or Time Warner, or Cox, or MetroPCS, would you wait until sprint makes it clear that Clearwire will be a financially stable, going concern...

        ... or would jump into an agreement before sprint signs on and "hope" clearwire gets the deal and avoids insolvency.

        Furthermore, if sprint abandons clearwire, sprint's existing 4G service gets hung out to dry... a 4G service that's been sprint's only avenue to subscriber growth and retention so far this year.

        Together, sprint and clearwire are powerful... estranged, they are individually weak...

        ... it's amazing that Dan Hesse has wasted almost a full year fighting and bickering like a child instead of acting decisively and leap-frogging Verizon with today's superior technology and Clearwire's unique ability to exploit and optimize that technology.

        S

      • Note that TWC, GOOG, INTC and CMCSA are all original investors in and current stakeholders of clearwire. TWC, GOOG and CMCSA are critically dependent on internet access. INTC would like to sell faster graphic enabled chips that benefit from fast internet access.

 
S
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