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Berkshire Hathaway Inc. Message Board

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  • syzygyzys syzygyzys May 25, 2011 8:53 AM Flag

    Insanely Great: WP7 Mango

    Theoretically, you could have a phone that offered both technologies, but I have not heard of one. Previously, you wouldn't have been saving much money, but with the new expensive touchscreens, it might happen. It would be a little confusing, since a GSM phone can be unlocked and made portable, by switching SIM cards (the provider can lock it without your knowing it, and they often enforce their contracts that way). A CDMA phone is essentially tied to the provider - it is possible to switch them over, but it doesn't happen as much as it happens with GSM.

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    • Thx SYZ,believe in Europe that you pick your phone & NOT your phone co.

      Different strokes,lol...

      • 1 Reply to coin612004
      • Europe is almost entirely GSM. As long is the phone isn't locked, you can switch phone companies by switching SIM cards. I wouldn't be surprised if in Europe it is illegal for the companies to lock your phone, so any phone would work for any company.

        I like the European system much better. Back in the 60s and 70s, Europe was dominated by big companies with government connections - often owned by the governments, and they would have had things like locked phones, while we would have had a more open system (though not with old Ma Bell, the exception). Now the companies here are so influential in government we have a closer connection between companies and government than the Socialists of the 70s could have dreamed of.

 
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