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AT&T, Inc. Message Board

  • froggnot froggnot Feb 15, 2013 11:33 AM Flag

    Maybe it's time for the US to embrace and enact immigration laws that mirror those of Mexico

    After a brief review of the progressive immigration laws of Mexico. IMHO most US citizens would probably say that if US laws were similar and enforced there would not be an issue between the two countries or its citizens.

    Just a little summary:

    o As of November 9, 2012 no one will be granted residency from within the country of Mexico. This means that if a non-citizen wants a residency status (i.e., temporary or permanent residency) he or she will need to apply at a Mexican consulate outside of the country of Mexico.
    o Temporary Resident - The Temporary Resident document will be issued for periods from 1-4 years, based on the decision of the immigration authority.
    o Permanent Resident - Permanent Resident status includes expressed permission to work in Mexico, but changes in employer and updates of activities are required.
    o Eligibility for either of these resident status types requires the applicant to meet various criteria (as identified by the Mexican government) before entering the country.
    o Penalties - If you are caught performing unauthorized activities your document can be cancelled and you can be asked to leave the country

    I know that there are a lot more details in the actual regulations, but again IMHO, if the US would enact similar laws and enforce them (like the Mexican government does), then there should not be an issue between our two countries or their citizens.

    "In your heart you know he is right."

    The Frogg

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    • According to the The Immigration and Nationality Act:

      "Any alien granted entry into the United States must be financially self-sufficient so as not to become a “public charge” dependent on welfar."

      And then you find out that DHS under President Barack Obama has aggressively campaigned immigrants to sign up for taxpayer-funded welfare benefits, going so far as to even create a WelcomeToUSA.gov website that educates immigrants about all the welfare programs for which they may apply.

      A study by the Center for Immigration Services found that in 2010, one out of three (36%) immigrant-headed households received at least one welfare benefit.

      Folks you just can't make this stuff up. The law says to do one thing and the current administration facilitates the doing of the opposite.

      What is wrong with this picture?

      "In your heart you know he is right."

      The Frogg

    • "The Frogg Less"

      That's just funny. Score one for yahoo.

      Froggie, those are about the same as the US laws. What do you think is different?

    • I worked in Mexico in the early 70's and I don't know if it is still the law or not, but if you were not of Mexican descent, or at least someone in your family was, you could not own property in Mexico. 99-year leases on recreational property, etc. were not uncommon. On several occasions my work permit was not ‘issued’ on time but after a small envelope of American dollars was ‘left’ on a border official’s desk, it suddenly appeared to have been found where it had been misplaced. The work permit was about $50 for a four-month period and each finder’s fee was about $150.

 
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