Thu, Jul 10, 2014, 10:36 PM EDT - U.S. Markets closed

Recent

% | $
Quotes you view appear here for quick access.

Check Point Software Technologies Ltd. Message Board

  • a_casablanca a_casablanca Nov 7, 2000 12:45 PM Flag

    article--HOLIDAY season and security!!

    Dialogue


    With the holiday season less
    than a month away, e-tailers and service providers
    alike are going on high alert against cyber assaults
    like the destructive distributed denial of service
    (DDoS) attacks that shut down several public Web sites
    by flooding their servers with traffic and
    preventing legitimate users from accessing the sites. Many
    in the industry-including Bill Hancock, senior vice
    president of security at Exodus Communications Inc. (Santa
    Clara, Calif.)-say new variants of DDoS could pose an
    even greater threat to e-business.

    What makes
    these attacks so appealing to the hacker
    community?

    These attacks are simple to launch, and they make a lot
    of noise. Distributed denial of service attacks
    don't require much technical skill, but they can have a
    huge impact on a site and a company.

    Given that
    DDoS attacks appear to be legitimate traffic, how do
    you weed out bad traffic from good?

    Not all
    distributed denial of service attacks look like common
    traffic, so you can institute rate-limiting filters to
    reduce the throughput speed of some streams of traffic
    and minimize the impact. Doing that, you're not
    actually killing off an attack, but you are slowing it
    down. For example, a lot of hackers use ICMP [Internet
    control message protocol] in their attacks. ICMP is a
    network management protocol that you would only use to
    ping a device. There really never should be a huge
    stream of ICMP traffic, so you can set a rate-limiting
    filter to block it.

    There is such a shortage of
    security expertise that some people say there are more
    experts working against companies than for
    them.

    There is still a huge dearth of security expertise.
    Really qualified experts are in high demand, and their
    numbers are not growing. A number of companies claim to
    have qualified experts, but a lot of those are really
    50,000-foot level security people who may be good at defining
    policy and direction but can't handle the day-to-day
    technical issues. You could look to the underground, at the
    hacker community, but most companies don't want to use
    an individual they can't trust. Security is, after
    all, all about trust. It is our policy and my personal
    policy not to hire hackers. I don't mind learning from
    them, but I don't want to employ
    them.

    http://www.teledotcom.com/

    Copyright � 2000 CMP Media Inc.




    http://www.teledotcom.com/directlink.cgi?TLC20001030S0006

    SortNewest  |  Oldest  |  Most Replied Expand all replies
    • >With the holiday season less than a month
      away, e-tailers and service providers
      alike are
      going on high alert against cyber assaults like the
      destructive
      distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks that
      shut down several public Web
      sites by flooding
      their servers with traffic and preventing legitimate
      users from
      accessing the sites. Many in the
      industry-including Bill Hancock, senior vice
      president of
      security at Exodus Communications Inc. (Santa Clara,
      Calif.)-say
      new variants of DDoS could pose an even greater
      threat to e-business.<

      Just curious, think
      Bill Hancock is related to Ellen Hancock (Exodus CEO)
      ? Not that it's wrong if he is, just
      Bush-like.

      Pedro

 
CHKP
64.81-0.60(-0.92%)Jul 10 4:00 PMEDT

Trending Tickers

i
Trending Tickers features significant U.S. stocks showing the most dramatic increase in user interest in Yahoo Finance in the previous hour over historic norms. The list is limited to those equities which trade at least 100,000 shares on an average day and have a market cap of more than $300 million.