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SPX Corporation Message Board

  • SPX is removing Fidelity Magellan from the 401K choices due to continued poor performance compared to the S&P 500.

    When will SPX stock be removed as a choice based on the same logic??

    Happy New Year to all

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    • actually, don't bother to respond.

      Have a nice life in dream land.

    • >>I await the chorus of CEO fans who can relate their personal stories of how the CEO really cared about them despite their poor performance and weak attendance.

      Ok, Mr. Bright....show me these NICE guys you're talking about. You can't nor can your pea brained friends.

    • Surprised you can read, oh wait. You can't.

    • Been following this thread for 5 years - one word - jackass

    • OH, really. Excuse me while I puke, puke, puke! You live in an intellectual dream world. Believe as you wish, but save your pity for someone who cares.

      Most of the great leaders of corporations and competitive enterprises are not nice people. Sure, they give away millions to charity. They have buildings named after them. They go to church on Sunday. They bounce babies on their knees. But when push comes to shove, the nices guys don't cut it.

      Dale Johnson, nice guy, didn't cut it. He was a guy who you would be pleased to call your friend.

      Jack Welsh, a son of a bitch, created tremendous shareholder value. George Steinbrenner, Mr. Nice guy, is the most successful baseball owner in history. John D. Rockefeller, most powerful business leader ever, savaged his competition AND their employees. He also built the U of Chicago and financed many research programs. Bill Gates, rich beyond belief, gives away millions each year. He's a tough and demanding business leader. At Microsoft, you perform or you're gone.

      There's a fine line between being tough and being mean, which I eluded to earlier, and a distinction you missed.

      As for honest and caring, CEO's honestly care about the bottom line and that's about it. Frankly, that's what they're paid to do.

      I await the chorus of CEO fans who can relate their personal stories of how the CEO really cared about them despite their poor performance and weak attendance.

    • Sorry. You're just plain stupid will never understand the point. Carry on!

    • OH, really. Excuse me while I puke, puke, puke! You live in an intellectual dream world. Believe as you wish, but save your pity for someone who cares.

      Most of the great leaders of corporations and competitive enterprizes are not nice people. Sure, they give away millions to charity. They have buildings named after them. They go to church on Sunday. They bounce babies on their knees. But when push comes to shove, the nices guys don't cut it.

      Dale Johnson, nice guy, didn't cut it. He was a guy who you would be pleased to call your friend. But as a CEO he didn't cut it as a result.

      Jack Welsh, a son of a bitch, but one who created tremendous shareholder value.

      George Steinbrenner, most successful baseball owner in history and a son of a bitch.

      John D. Rockefeller, most powerful business leader ever, savaged his competition AND their employees. He also built the U of Chicago and financed many research programs.

      Bill Gates, rich beyond belief, gives away millions each year. He's a tough and demanding business leader. At Microsoft, you perform or you're gone.

      There's a fine line between being tough and being mean, which I aluded to earlier, and a distinction you missed.

      As for honest and caring, CEO's honestly care about the bottom line and that's about it. Frankly, that's what they're paid to do.

      I await the chorus of CEO fans who can relate their personal stories of how the CEO really cared about them despite their poor performance and weak attendance.

    • I, and surely many of us, truely pity you. The concept that business leaders, or any leaders who are successful cannot be kind, caring and honest reflects specifically to your ethics, integrity and values; and, your opinion that winners cannot be nice guys is testimony to what can only be described as your own selfishness, greed and inability to face your life and your career in a forthright and responsible manner.

      I, and many of us know many highly successful leaders who are driven by extremely high values, ethics and integrity. Being a "nice guy" most certainly does not mean you are weak, indecisive, not intelligent or ready and able to take your competition to the cleaners. I personally know numerous "nice guys" who will kick your butt, and who are very rpofitable in growing, dynamic companies. And, they do it straight up and in your face.

      Oh, by the way. You don't know baseball, either. You're assuming that the desire and competitive drive to succeed and win is incompatible with high values. You're simply wrong. There are hundreds of examples. You should do some research.

    • Spx bought the company I work for almost three years ago now. We received part of our ESOP money and were told that we had to wait two years for the rest due to IRS regulations. This time was over in Oct. of 04 and we all keep getting informed that the IRS has not has not approved distribution. It keeps getting set back each quarter. Does any one know how I can find out the information needed to find out the real deal?

    • Eventually, the interests of the shareholders and the employees collide. This is especially true in enterprises faced with developing competition with advantage. Nice guys finish last in baseball and in corporate America. Show me a nice guy running a corporation and I'll show you an overwhelming competitive advantage, soon to be lost to Asian competition.

      No matter the CEO he makes tough decisions or answer to the shareholders.

      Sad to say that KIND, CARING, HONEST, qualities belong in the clergy not in the office of CEO. The threat of getting caught is the only reason CEO's are honest and THAT doesn't stop 'em all.

      Cruelty is in the eye of the beholder. Is it cruel to close a business that's hopelessly losing money in order to save the whole? Putting a 1000 people out of work is cruel in the eyes of some. When you enjoy seeing someone lose their job, now that is cruel. When you seem to enjoy firing a manager who really deserved it and make fun of him later, then that is cruel.

      Define selfish. Is it selfish when the board hands you 20% of the company, gives you a no risk contract?

      Give us a shrewd, decisive, respected, appreciative, energetic, visionary CEO capable of making the tough choices and the strength see them through. That's what this company needs IMHO......

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101.62-1.89(-1.83%)Jul 30 4:02 PMEDT

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