Thu, Jan 29, 2015, 11:32 AM EST - U.S. Markets close in 4 hrs 28 mins

Recent

% | $
Quotes you view appear here for quick access.

SPX Corporation Message Board

  • Traveller_in_Europe Traveller_in_Europe Oct 21, 1998 9:46 AM Flag

    Lightnin & Dezurik

    Does anyone have an indication as to what SPX will do with Lightnin & Dezurik. It doesn't look like they fit well in the SPX business

    SortNewest  |  Oldest  |  Most Replied Expand all replies
    • Here's a bio on Riordan from SPX's website... It
      would appear that the connection with Blystone is from
      the JI Case days.

      Thomas J. Riordan, President
      of SPX�s
      Service Solutions business, joined SPX
      in
      February, 1996. He began his career in 1979
      at
      Borg-Warner Automotive where he held
      several positions of
      increasing responsibility in
      manufacturing and product
      management. In
      1989, he joined J. I. Case as Manager of
      the
      Racine, Wisconsin, transmission plant and
      was
      appointed Vice President, European
      Manufacturing in
      1990. He was Vice President
      of Manufacturing at IVEX
      Corporation from
      1991 to 1994 and President of
      Consolidated
      Sawmill Machinery International, Inc., from
      1994 to
      1996. He has a B. S. degree in
      Industrial
      Engineering from Northwestern
      University and an M. S.
      degree in Industrial
      Administration from Purdue
      University.

    • Dear AnnRan, Thanks for setting me straight. I confused Tom Riordan with Dan Riordan, who was the head of sales at Snap-on and on the Board in the late 1980s.

    • To my knowledge, Riordan never worked at Snap-
      On. He is an Ex-GE buddy of Blystones. From
      first-hand experience, Tom will do whatever it takes to get
      the job done, which almost always includes cutting
      overhead. I believe he was unemployed at the time John
      asked him to join SPX.

    • :^) Thanks notagealum...

    • to you for that great essay. Terrific. You're
      right, GE year after year is voted one of the most
      admired corporations in America. Some day SPX may be too.
      It often occurs that when a new management takes
      over a company that a lot of "restructuring" or
      "downsizing" is required. That is unfortunate, and it has
      happened to me too. A lot of very capable people get
      caught up in that, but so do lots of people who were
      "slackers" before and who have spent most of their working
      lives trying to do as little as they possibly can. I've
      seen it. The fault for the cutting really goes to the
      past management that didn't manage with long term
      prosperity or even survival in mind. They let organizations
      get too fat or lazy or misdirected. That can't
      continue under any system, especially ours, and certainly
      couldn't either in the old Soviet Union where everthing
      finally collapsed because there was no one left to tax
      anymore to cover the losses of the bloated government
      enterprises. Sooner or later the piper has to be paid.


      Tiltme has great advice. I wish you well. It might look
      very dark now but for many there will be a great dawn.

    • We're probably closer aligned on this than I
      first thought. It's just the inflamatory stuff that
      gets me going.

      Believe me I understand the
      uncomfortable feeling that you have at the moment. Been there
      done that.

      As for your situation, if you have
      poor division leadership and they make poor choices
      about who contributes and who doesn't, then everyone in
      your business is going to be in trouble. Even if your
      leadership knows what they are doing they will make
      mistakes. Those that don't make mistakes don't do anything
      at all. I can give you a little guidance.

      GE
      is the most sucessful industrial organization in the
      history of business. Their style is hard driving, high
      energy, and with a take no prisoners attitude. If you
      want to know about SPX top management, read Jack
      Welch's book or better yet the annual report of GE for
      the last 2-3 years. If you don't want to be on this
      kind of winning team, then go work elsewhere. That's
      not a smart remark, just some sage advice.

      If
      you want to fight to stay on the team here's my 2
      cents. For the old SPXer's still on the team, the
      experience has been a learning experience. It's better than
      an MBA. Many didn't make the team from the old SPX
      because they were what helped produce the poor results
      for the shareholders for years.

      Your division
      is going through an assessment phase which lasts 6
      months or so. Once completed the business will be either
      on the road towards growth or it will become
      history. Fix, sell, or grow, that's the system. Read the
      EVA stuff on the web for more information. Your
      business unit manager will be assessed along the way. If
      the business leader doesn't practice the leadership
      standards and make the business commitments then you'll
      have a new business leader, who will be better equiped
      to lead your business.

      SPX gives every
      leader a chance to make the team. Some come to the plate
      swinging and others will sit there with the bat on their
      shoulder. Others won't come out of the dugout in fear of
      whatever.

      Once the team and the players make the "league" then
      the focus goes to growth. A growth rate of 15% per
      year is required. So even a good business that's not
      growing may be a candidate for sale. If you have a good
      business, somebody will want to own it! Better that then a
      lousy business.

      This whole thing starts to sound
      "heartless" and "cold blooded" to use your words, but the
      fact is that sucessful business leaders aren't nice
      guys. SPX had nice guys running the business in the
      early 90's. What did that get most SPX people? A
      business destine to go nose first into the
      ground.

      The SPX shareholders love the new SPX team. I'm not
      talking about the wall street types, but the average Joe.
      The team was applauded at the last shareholders
      meeting. That's how much they miss the previous group of
      "nice guys" who were destroying the company. The same
      reception is given to the leadership team when they come to
      the plant.

      I wish you the best of
      luck....

      Sincerely

    • We're probably closer aligned on this than I
      first thought. It's just the inflamatory stuff that
      gets me going.

      Believe me I understand the
      uncomfortable feeling that you have at the moment. Been there
      done that.

      As for your situation, if you have
      poor division leadership and they make poor choices
      about who contributes and who doesn't, then everyone in
      your business is going to be in trouble. Even if your
      leadership knows what they are doing they will make
      mistakes. Those that don't make mistakes don't do anything
      at all. I can give you a little guidance.

      GE
      is the most sucessful industrial organization in the
      history of business. Their style is hard driving, high
      energy, and with a take no prisoners attitude. If you
      want to know about SPX top management, read Jack
      Welch's book or better yet the annual report of GE for
      the last 2-3 years. If you don't want to be on this
      kind of winning team, then go work elsewhere. That's
      not a smart remark, just some sage advice.

      If
      you want to fight to stay on the team here's my 2
      cents. For the old SPXer's still on the team, the
      experience has been a learning experience. It's better than
      an MBA. Many didn't make the team from the old SPX
      because they were what helped produce the poor results
      for the shareholders for years.

      Your division
      is going through an assessment phase which lasts 6
      months or so. Once completed the business will be either
      on the road towards growth or it will become
      history. Fix, sell, or grow, that's the system. Read the
      EVA stuff on the web for more information. Your
      business unit manager will be assessed along the way. If
      the business leader doesn't practice the leadership
      standards and make the business commitments then you'll
      have a new business leader, who will be better equiped
      to lead your business.

      The SPX gives every
      leader a chance to make the team. Some come to the plate
      swinging and others will sit there with the bat on their
      shoulder. Others won't come out of the dugout in fear of
      whatever.

      Once the team and the players make the "league" then
      the focus goes to growth. A growth rate of 15% per
      year is required. So even a good business that's not
      growing may be a candidate for sale. If you have a good
      business, somebody will want to own it! Better that then a
      lousy business.

      This whole thing starts to sound
      "heartless" and "cold blooded" to use your words, but the
      fact is that sucessful business leaders aren't nice
      guys. SPX had nice guys running the business in the
      early 90's. What did that get most SPX people? A
      business destine to go nose first into the
      ground.

      The SPX shareholders love the new SPX team. I'm not
      talking about the wall street types, but the average Joe.
      The team was applauded at the last shareholders
      meeting. That's how much they miss the previous group of
      "nice guys" who were destroying the company. The same
      reception is given to the leadership team when they come to
      the plant.

      I wish you the best of
      luck....

      Sincerely

    • I feel like we are talking apples and oranges
      here. This is the last attempt I will make to try to
      clarify. In the past year, it seems the major focus has
      been on "who" we can cut, which sometimes doesn't have
      anything to do with the person performing the job, but the
      constant focus on numbers that just need to be cut. It
      doesn't appear to matter that an employee has been
      contributing, just that someone at the top says X amount of
      heads or $ needs to go and that's it. Due to politics
      within the system, those who do not know how to play the
      game, are the ones who tend to get cut. When employees
      who have worked very hard for 30 or 40 years go out
      the door with barely a good bye, or thanks for the
      hard work, it makes one wonder.

      No, I do not
      advocate a communist system where workers are protected
      regardless of their competency. Yes, thank God, the ones who
      have been wasting space are finally gone, or
      going.

      However, almost weekly, I'm hearing about another "list".
      Is anybody working on product improvement? When all
      the news (intercompany) is always about downsizing
      and restructuring, I guess it just gets muddy as to
      what we are in business for.

    • Comparisons to Hilter are absurd. You obviously
      equate job loss to loss of life. What's great about this
      country is we have a free will to go where we feel most
      appreciated.

      The Soviet Union tried a system where the
      workers were king and non-performers were protected. Look
      what it did for them. Did that help the lot of the
      common person? North Korea can't even feed it's own
      people. Is that a system better then one filled with cold
      blooded managers?

      In a perfect world everybody
      contributes, greed and envy don't exist, everyone is treated
      the same, nobody loses their jobs, prices never go
      up, and nobody wants for education, medicine, and
      security. Fact is this will never exist anywhere.

      I
      tell you that a world without accountability is a not
      one I want to live in.

      In my experience, very
      few poor performers come from the ranks of people who
      just don't have the smarts or physical ability to do
      the job. It does hurt to see those people lose their
      jobs. But what is more painful is to see good people
      lose their jobs because of foreign competition or
      worse because of poor leaders.

      In our imperfect
      system, some innocent people are going to get hurt. I
      would rather see that then a system where most
      everyone's standard of living is hurt.

    • A friend of mine once said, "the only fair tax is
      the one the other guy pays." I wonder if and when you
      get the ax you will say, well I wasn't performing so
      this is o.k.

      To take this to a higher level,
      elimination of the inferior was the main objective of Hitler.
      He felt the weaker ones needed to be eliminated to
      allow the perfect to thrive. Is this where we are
      going?

      "Poor performers" is a relative term. Wake up! Not all
      the "poor performers" were lazy and worthless (some
      were, yes); if you happen to know the criteria involved
      in the ax-cutting I would be curious to know.


      Just for the record, I'm not concerned for myself;
      this isn't the first job I've ever had and it won't be
      the last. Whether they cut me or I walk, I will
      succeed. My job is just my job, it's not my life! I'm not
      willing to cut someone else's throat to save my own.

    • View More Messages
 
SPW
82.7394+0.0394(+0.05%)11:28 AMEST

Trending Tickers

i
Trending Tickers features significant U.S. stocks showing the most dramatic increase in user interest in Yahoo Finance in the previous hour over historic norms. The list is limited to those equities which trade at least 100,000 shares on an average day and have a market cap of more than $300 million.