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Denison Mines Corp. Message Board

  • savage_planet savage_planet Sep 30, 2011 11:52 AM Flag

    who is selling and to who?

    Given that about 15% of the world's electricity is generated by "burning" uranium and that Russia, India, China and others are building new reactors, I can't believe any informed personal investors would be selling uranium miners at these reduced prices.

    Is the selling done by banks and hedge funds and yet another bank buys? Is it done by programmatic trading?

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    • I think we agree on 95% of everything and the 5% we do not agree on is a matter of talking past one another, my reference for a long time is that of wall street, where 2 years is a long time, but by next time this year the ghost of Fukushima will be mostly faded away, and the long term potential of DNN and other major players in the U biz will be fully realized again, however the nuclear build out is a long term process that will take another 10 years or more and there will be many ups and downs during that time, but DNN is a solid way to invest in the future of N power.

      And by the way, I am and have been long DNN, but along the way of the nuclear build out, hitting a single, double or triple is some times better than waiting on the home run, investment wise that is, because if u add up all the small wins at the end of the day, you and me can still be winners.

    • At the start of your thread here you cite a globe and mail article that says it takes a long time for a stock to recover after a "crash". I'm telling you NOT to pay any attention to these "news" articles. I like you Mr. Cooper. You are a gentleman with whom I have a difference of opinion. I think you are making a big mistake to be out of this stock at this time. Good luck to you though.

    • I think u should read my post dating back to sept 2011, when DNN was around $1, and I and a few others had the guts to say buy all u can, but not to worry about me @ $2.41 it is a double for me and I am out for now. but GLTU

    • You see Mr. Cooper, this is why you NEVER pay attention to the "news" when making investment decisions. You ALWAYS want to be on the side on the market pros. As I said earlier, this stock has been under hugh accumulation by the pros and will run much higher, irrespective of what you might read in the "news". Not trying to be a SmartA**, just trying to educate and help others avoid the painful lessons I have learned over the years.

    • Here it is, for some reason it will not paste, from the Australian edition of the WSJ



      Fukushima fallout 'to hurt prices for years'

      by: Barry Fitzgerald
      From:The Australian
      February 02, 201212:00AM

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      Source: The Australian









      RANGER uranium miner Energy Resources of Australia has warned that demand fall-off following last year's Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan means uranium prices are likely to remain subdued until at least 2014.

      The warning came as ERA, a 68 per cent-owned, listed subsidiary of Rio Tinto, confirmed it plunged in to losses last year as the Ranger mine inside Kakadu National Park battled to deal with record rainfall.

      ERA plunged from a $47 million profit in 2010 to a loss of $153.6m after a previously announced charge of $99.4m for a low-grade inventory value adjustment.

      Ignoring the charge, the group's loss on an underlying basis of $54.2m was higher than most analysts had been expecting.

      ERA was forced last year to raise $500m from Rio and its minority shareholders to fund long-term water handling solutions at Ranger.

      Flooding at the operation forced the suspension of processing operations between the end of January to mid-June last year. No dividend has been declared (8c per share in 2010).








      .
      . .
      ERA shares fell as much as 12 per cent to $1.35 yesterday as investors absorbed the loss and the downbeat assessment of where uranium prices are headed.

      The warning that it could take until 2014 before uranium prices recover dashes hopes of investors who have in recent weeks bought in heavily to Australian and Canadian uranium producers and explorers in the expectation that uranium demand would rebound more quickly from Fukushima than first thought.

      ERA told analysts at a briefing yesterday that the uranium market would remain subdued until excess supply, caused by Japan's nuclear shutdown and curtailments elsewhere, cleared the market.

      It said market prices were expected to rise in the 2014-2020 period, driven by an expected shortfall in production from proposed new mine developments.

      The spot uranium price is $US52 ($48.90) a pound, having weakened from more than $US70 a pound after the Fukushima plant suffered a partial meltdown when it was hit by a violent earthquake and a subsequent tsunami on March 11.

      "In the short term, the uranium market appears to be adequately supplied with utilities holding sufficient inventories and there is mostly discretionary demand in the market," ERA said.

      "Following the Fukushima accident, buying slowed as utilities in Japan and around the world conducted extensive nuclear safety reviews."

      ERA said the market would remain at current levels "until demand increases and nuclear plants in Japan begin to restart."

    • And to you as well. It's hard to be a long term, patient investor. That's why so few people make any money in this game.

    • I am going to take your word for everything you said, because after all you said it, and also wish you good luck and happy investing.

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DNN
1.31-0.05(-3.68%)Sep 2 4:01 PMEDT

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