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  • mrwrnc81 mrwrnc81 Aug 24, 2011 11:04 AM Flag

    Article in BLH on nano particle and doxorubicine

    Got my copy of BottomLine Health newsletter and they had a nice write up on doxorubicine.

    http://www.bottomlinesecrets.com/article.html?article_id=100004631

    Written by this guy...Paolo Decuzzi

    Not able to copy and print article, but I was very curious to understand how Tdox is different from regular encapasulated Dox in terms of how it is delivered or dosed. The article sure made it sound as if the technique of encapsulation is similar to TDOX:

    "Though the technology itself is not widely recognized by the public, one of the first nanodrugs for treating cancer, doxorubicin hydrochloride liposome(Doxil), was approved by the FDA several years ago. This potent chemotherapy drug is encased by a liposome, a lipid-based nanoparticle. The drug is used to treat ovarian and breast cancers, leukemia and Kaposi's sarcoma."

    more to follow

    SortNewest  |  Oldest  |  Most Replied Expand all replies
    • How long has this publication been in existence, is the author an MD, what is the publication's claim to credibility in the medical community.

      Thanks for any answers.
      MOJO

    • Partial section:

      "Though the technology itself is not widely recognized by the public, one of the first nanodrugs for treating cancer, doxorubicin hydrochloride liposome (Doxil), was approved by the FDA several years ago. This potent chemotherapy drug is encased by a liposome, a lipid-based nanoparticle. The drug is used to treat ovarian and breast cancers, leukemia and Kaposi's sarcoma.

      Dox is carried into cells by the nanoparticle. When it's encased in a nanoparticle, more of the active ingredient stays concentrated until it is released into the tumor.

      This is critical for preventing or reducing side effects. At the same time, it allows oncologists to use a higher dose because the improved biodistribution reduces toxicity. A higher dose is more likely to kill all the cancer cells, preventing relapse. A handful of nanodrugs have been approved by the FDA, and many more are in the pipeline for clinical trials.

      Why is a nanoparticle more “targeted” tha an individual molecule? When you take a conventional drug, the molecules enter the bloodstream and scatter in different directions. Some of the active ingredient will go where it’s needed, but most of the molecules will reach and penetrate other tissues, including the liver, kidneys, heart and lungs. This scattershot effect is what causes many of the side effects of chemotherapy and other drug treatments, such as nausea and hair loss.

      Currently approved anticancer nanodrugs, however, utilize the fenestrations (openings) in tumor blood vessels that are absent or smaller in normal tissue. Most nanodrugs are designed to pass through tumor vessel walls are too large to enter healthy ttissue.

      Can this work with all cancers?

      Potentially, yes…but in different ways. It’s complicated because the size of the blood vessel openings varies depending on the type of cancer. Also, the number and/or size of the openings change over the course of the disease. They don’t occur uniformly—some areas within a tumor will have these openings, and other areas do not. This limits the effectiveness of treatments. And fenestrations are characteristic in cancer but absent in other diseases.

      A new strtategy is to develop nanoparticles that are designed to recognize and lodge in the diseased blood vessels rather than cross into the tumor openings. The particles will stick to the outer walls of the blood vessels that supply tumors. Then, they’ll release even smaller particles that pass through the blood vessels, deep into the tumor.

      What other type of nano treatments are available?

      Much of the work is still in experimental stages. Scientists have developed thermal ablation therapy nanoparticles that deliver heat instead of drugs to the diseased tissue. The nanoparticles injected into the body accumulate in tumors. When exposed to an external source of energy, the nanoparticles generate heat, increasing the temperature in the surrounding tissue. Cancer cells start to die when their temperature reaches about 115 F degrees. Different nanoparticles and external energy sources hae been proposed and tested.

      For example, nanoparticles made of gold would be warmed by an infrared laser, penetrating a few millimeters deep into the body. Magnetic fields have also been used with iron oxide nanoparticles, and this therapy is currently approved in Europe to treat glioblastoma multiforme, a deadly brain tumor.


      What else can loaded into nanoparticles?

      In theory, NPs can contain almost anything, including drug “cocktails” for treating cancer or other diseasesl such as diabetes or heart disease.

      We can also create multifunctional NPs that combine imaging and treatment. For example, a NP could release drug molecules for treatin a cancer. Then, it would release imaging agents to show how well the treatment is working. Such NPs are now being created for experimental purposes, but it’s too early to predict when the technology may available for clinical use.”

    • Written by this guy...Paolo Decuzzi

      http://www.methodisthealth.com/tmhri.cfm?id=40153

    • BLH continued

      "This is critical for preventing or reducing side effects. At the same time, it allows oncologists to use a higher dose because the improved biodistribution reduces toxicity. A higher dose is more likely to kill all the cancer cells, preventing relapse. A handful of nanodrugs have been approved by the FDA, and many more are in the pipeline for clinical trials.

      Why is a nanoparticle more “targeted” tha an individual molecule? When you take a conventional drug, the molecules enter the bloodstream and scatter in different directions. Some of the active ingredient will go where it’s needed, but most of the molecules will reach and penetrate other tissues, including the liver, kidneys, heart and lungs. This scattershot effect is what causes many of the side effects of chemotherapy and other drug treatments, such as nausea and hair loss.

      Currently approved anticancer nanodrugs, however, utilize the fenestrations (openings) in tumor blood vessels that are absent or smaller in normal tissue. Most nanodrugs are designed to pass through tumor vessel walls are too large to enter healthy ttissue.

      Can this work with all cancers?

      Potentially, yes…but in different ways. It’s complicated because the size of the blood vessel openings varies depending on the type of cancer. Also, the number and/or size of the openings change over the course of the disease. They don’t occur uniformly—some areas within a tumor will have these openings, and other areas do not. This limits the effectiveness of treatments. And fenestrations are characteristic in cancer but absent in other diseases.

      A new strtategy is to develop nanoparticles that are designed to recognize and lodge in the diseased blood vessels rather than cross into the tumor openings. The particles will stick to the outer walls of the blood vessels that supply tumors. Then, they’ll release even smaller particles that pass through the blood vessels, deep into the tumor.

      What other type of nano treatments are available?

      Much of the work is still in experimental stages. Scientists have developed thermal ablation therapy nanoparticles that deliver heat instead of drugs to the diseased tissue. The nanoparticles injected into the body accumulate in tumors. When exposed to an external source of energy, the nanoparticles generate heat, increasing the temperature in the surrounding tissue. Cancer cells start to die when their temperature reaches about 115 F degrees. Different nanoparticles and external energy sources hae been proposed and tested.

      For example, nanoparticles made of gold would be warmed by an infrared laser, penetrating a few millimeters deep into the body. Magnetic fields have also been used with iron oxide nanoparticles, and this therapy is currently approved in Europe to treat glioblastoma multiforme, a deadly brain tumor.


      What else can loaded into nanoparticles?

      In theory, NPs can contain almost anything, including drug “cocktails” for treating cancer or other diseasesl such as diabetes or heart disease.

      We can also create multifunctional NPs that combine imaging and treatment. For example, a NP could release drug molecules for treatin a cancer. Then, it would release imaging agents to show how well the treatment is working. Such NPs are now being created for experimental purposes, but it’s too early to predict when the technology may available for clinical use.”

 
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