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Time Warner Inc. Message Board

  • dow_12K_n_2Q_00 dow_12K_n_2Q_00 Jul 26, 1999 6:46 PM Flag

    AOL IS A BISCUIT EATER(EGG SUCKER)

    What the HELL is OPEN ACCESS--You get pissed and
    close your system when MSFT tries to use part of it's
    "open ness", yet you go whining to Congress to give AOL
    open access to broadband. DAMN, you can't have it both
    ways, Steve Case!! Always open to you but closed when
    you want it to be ain't going to cut it for
    long!!!!!!!

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    • I can't predict how far or how long the down
      trend will be or how low it will go. One thing I have
      learned about the market after being in it for many years
      is NEVER SAY NEVER.
      I do not expect any compeling
      positive or negative news that will move the stock to a
      point that is NON-REVERSABLE at this time.
      All I
      have to look back to is the past as a reference point
      and incorporate what I know at this moment and try to
      make logical decisions.
      However, based on the
      leadership from STEVE CASE and the strategic decisions made
      from AOL in the past years, I STRONGLY BELIEVE THAT
      AOL WILL BE SIGNIFICANTLY HIGHER THAN LAST NIGHT'S
      CLOSE (100 1/8) by the end of the year. The open access
      issue?
      well, I think any real meaningful and lasting results
      will not come until the year 2000 and after. But,
      remember, the cable issue does not impact AOL's financial
      status much on the near term. AOL has solid customers
      which need and like its service and AOL is doing VERY
      well with what it has. Therefore, I really am not
      worry about AOL on a near term and especially on the
      long term. I will not put all my eggs in AOL's basket
      since I may need some of my funds in the near future.
      But, I am willing to commit a substantial portion of
      my portfolio in AOL based on its fundamental and
      what I BELIEVE WILL HAPPEN WITH THE OPEN ACCESS
      ISSUE.
      HOPE THIS HELPS, REGARDS!

    • this morning! They knew!

    • Are you for real! This is a good decision for AOL!! I'm sure you wish you had more shares tonight.

    • Finally I read something that made sense in the middle of garbage. I doubt if most of these guys in here really own AOL.

      Thanks again...Could you tell me how far the down trend will be?

    • At the very beginning, it looked as if San
      Francisco's decision to not FORCE AT@T to open to ISP at this
      time is bad. However,
      but when I read more about
      what happened, it looks VERY good for open access and
      for AOL. San Francisco supervisors are unanimously
      FOR OPEN ACCESS and will file a FRIEND OF THE COURT
      BRIEF to the federal court in support of the Portland's
      decision.
      In other words, it is completely FOR open access and
      is against AT@T. San Francisco can't really change
      any meaningful agreements made with vendors until
      DECEMBER so it is now just waiting. By no means, is the
      open access issue dead, if fact, the support from San
      Francisco helps with the momentum already in place for open
      access. OPEN ACCESS WILL BE ENFORCED. It may take some
      time, but will become law. Does anyone really think
      that AT@T will have another monopoly again? NO WAY, we
      are approaching the year 2000. Enlightened minds will
      not go backwards to 50 years ago when MONOPOLY is
      tolerated.
      So, in short, DO NOT LET THE "SHORTS" BAD TALK YOU
      INTO SELL YOUR AOL STOCK. THEY WANT YOU TO AND WILL
      TRY TO SCARE YOU INTO DOING SO. AOL has VERY good
      fundamentals and will continue to do well in the future. It
      may run into BUMPS along the way, but the journey for
      the long term I believe is UPWARDS.

      BEST
      REGARDS from a experienced investor and a AOL LONG!!!

    • WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--July 26, 1999-- San
      Francisco's Board of Supervisors today unanimously passed a
      resolution to support open access to the city's high-speed
      Internet cable network, and agreed to file a
      friend-of-the-court brief in support of Portland, Oregon's battle
      against AT&T in the federal courts.

      The openNET
      Coalition, a national group of 200 independent Internet
      Service Providers working for a fair, open and
      competitive Internet cable network, hailed the city's
      adoption of an open access policy. The Board of
      Supervisors amended the city's franchise agreement with AT&T,
      and included a provision that will allow the city to
      impose open access subject to certain conditions. The
      city intends to take up the issue of open access again
      in December when its franchise agreement allows it
      to unilaterally impose open access.

      ``Open
      access continues to gain momentum. From Northern
      California to Southern Florida, communities are taking a
      stand and voting for what is best for their citizens,''
      said Greg Simon, Co-Director of the openNET coalition.
      ``San Francisco officials understand the importance of
      open access and that's why they are supporting
      Portland.''

      San Francisco's vote follows similar
      votes in Portland, Oregon, and Broward County, Florida,
      requiring AT&T to sell open access to its high-speed cable
      network. The votes occurred as part of AT&T's request for
      transfer of local franchises from Tele-Communications,
      Inc. and MediaOne, which it has purchased. AT&T's
      purchase of two of the nation's four largest cable
      companies give the former telephone monopoly access to 60
      percent of all American homes.

      ``We continue to
      be encouraged by these votes since all we're asking
      for is a chance to buy the high-speed access,'' Simon
      said. ``We want to pay for access, but AT&T is intent
      on continuing to build its monopoly and shut out
      smaller ISPs to the detriment of consumers.''


      Cable is the only high-speed path to the Internet that
      is not required to allow competing ISPs to buy
      access. The result of the open nature of the telephone
      network over the last few years has been the development
      of a vibrant Internet marketplace of thousands of
      innovative ISPs competing for customers.

      ``We
      believe that there is no reason for cable to be treated
      any differently than every other technology,'' said
      Rich Bond, Co-Director of the openNET Coalition.


      The resolution ``establishes that it is the policy of
      the City and County of San Francisco to support, open
      non-discriminatory access to broadband access services...'' The
      resolution urged city staff to ``take all possible actions
      to implement this policy at federal, state and local
      level'' including filing an amicus brief.


      Portland, Oregon, and nearby Multnomah County voted last
      spring to require AT&T to open its cable network and
      sell access. AT&T then sued the city and lost. U.S.
      District Judge Owen Panner ruled that local communities
      have jurisdiction and the right to require competition
      in the public interest. AT&T has appealed the ruling
      the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco.


      San Francisco's Board of Supervisors decided on
      Monday to file a ``friend of the court'' brief in
      support of Portland's right to require competition in a
      communications network as important as high-speed Internet
      access.

      Commissioners for Broward County,
      Florida, voted earlier this month for an ordinance
      requiring cable companies to sell access to their
      high-speed Internet networks to rival ISP's. Broward County
      was then sued by Comcast
      Cable

      http://biz.yahoo.com/bw/990726/dc_opennet_1.html

    • eom

    • true! Go ATHM

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