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Intel Corporation Message Board

  • singhlion2001 singhlion2001 Sep 27, 2012 9:38 PM Flag

    INTEL WILL BE SINGLE DIGIT STOCK IN 2013:THIS IS THE REAL PROBLEM FOR INTEL NEXT $30 SoC or $250 CPU?

    On Pricing and ARM
    Intel claims that there's no reason that Atom based Windows 8 tablets, from a hardware bill of materials perspective, should be any more expensive than their ARM based counterparts. The important takeaway is that Intel is significantly reducing the price of the Atom Z2760 due to competitive pressure from ARM. Most ARM smartphone SoCs seem to be priced in the $15 - $30 range, and I'd expect the Z2760 to fall somewhere in that range. Intel has shipped cheap CPUs in the past, but I don't know that they've ever shipped something this cheap. ARM's impact on Intel is measurable, it is the new AMD.

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    • So you think they will pay over $1 in dividends in 2013? You could be right.

    • 15 billion arms licensed to date

      98% of cellphones since 2005 have had arms in them. all ipods, ipads, nintendo ds and gba, most routers and other hardware. once, people did buy 8051 series, now they use arm instead. intel now only have pc and pc server markets. pcs are starting to dwindle due to the rise of tablets, servers will also fall as power becomes more expensive. Intel fabs may be the best at making huge expensive chips, but what if that isn't what people want?

    • Bye my Dear Paul.Great job but Blunders in the end under your command at Intel and incoming CEO must face harsh reality to compete with a new mind set...........

      For New CEO:
      More interesting will be how Intel's sales and marketing will change. Relatively few people care about the CPU inside their smart phone or tablet, and it's unlikely that any Intel marketing campaign will make end users care. Add in the fact that even high end smart phones tend to be built with low cost, commodity chips. That means Intel will need to compete on price, something it's never been fond of doing. On top of that, it doesn't really have the marketing leverage on the mobile side that it has in the PC business, so potential OEM customers don't care about issues like x86 compatibility or the chipset ecosystem. What phone OEMs want is price and guaranteed delivery. Intel's manufacturing muscle may play well, giving Intel marketers some leverage. But it's up in the air, and with ARM owning the lion's share of the smart device market, Intel has a long uphill battle. Will it be able to push PC technology down far enough so that it can compete on price and power, even as revenues from the PC side continue to slide? That's the conundrum the next Intel CEO will need to face, and it won't be an easy puzzle to solve.

    • Bye my Dear Paul.Great job but Blunders in the end under your command at Intel and incoming CEO must face harsh reality to compete with a new mind set...........

      For New CEO:
      More interesting will be how Intel's sales and marketing will change. Relatively few people care about the CPU inside their smart phone or tablet, and it's unlikely that any Intel marketing campaign will make end users care. Add in the fact that even high end smart phones tend to be built with low cost, commodity chips. That means Intel will need to compete on price, something it's never been fond of doing. On top of that, it doesn't really have the marketing leverage on the mobile side that it has in the PC business, so potential OEM customers don't care about issues like x86 compatibility or the chipset ecosystem. What phone OEMs want is price and guaranteed delivery. Intel's manufacturing muscle may play well, giving Intel marketers some leverage. But it's up in the air, and with ARM owning the lion's share of the smart device market, Intel has a long uphill battle. Will it be able to push PC technology down far enough so that it can compete on price and power, even as revenues from the PC side continue to slide? That's the conundrum the next Intel CEO will need to face, and it won't be an easy puzzle to solve.

    • Most ARM smartphone SoCs seem to be priced in the $15 - $30 range, and I'd expect the Z2760 to fall somewhere in that range. Intel has shipped cheap CPUs in the past, but I don't know that they've ever shipped something this cheap. ARM's impact on Intel is measurable, it is the new AMD.

      Hey Jackass - 2015 tw2entyfifteen LOL

      The announcement of a goal for Globalfoundries to be profitable by 2015 and a potential IPO suggests Globalfoundries' parent - the sovereign wealth investment vehicle Advanced Technology Investment Co. – wants to stop handing out cash and indeed is looking to reduce and, possibly, to eventually eliminate its stake in the chip maker.

    • So bashers.....Fraud street also now almost screaming with a spin, what I am warning

      Sentiment: Strong Sell

    • APU can push Intel to lower prices for Core i3
      Monica Chen, Taipei; Joseph Tsai, DIGITIMES [Friday 28 September 2012]
      AMD has unveiled its desktop Trinity APUs, and Taiwan-based motherboard makers hope that the launch will bring pressure on Intel to decrease prices for its similar-level processors.

      The sources hope that price competition between Intel and AMD processors can heat up the PC DIY channel and attract consumer demand to return.

      Since AMD has not launched any product that could seriously threaten Intel's market share during the past year, Intel has been rather tough with its processor prices to maintain high gross margins, and the lack of price competition has weakened demand in the PC DIY market.

      Adopting the new FM2 socket, AMD has released several Trinity APUs including quad-core A10-5800K, featuring integrated Radeon HD 7660D GPU, A10-5700, A8-5600K, A8-5500 and dual-core A4-5300.

      Currently, Intel Core i3 series processor prices range from US$117-138, while AMD's new Trinity APUs are priced at US$69-129.

      AMD new desktop Trinity APU prices, Sep 2012 (US$)

      CPU model
      Price
      A10-5800K
      129
      A10-5700
      129
      A8-5600K
      109
      A8-5500
      109
      A6-5400K
      65
      A4-5300
      52
      Athlon X4 750K
      79
      Athlon X4 740
      69
      Source: Upstream supply chain, compiled by Digitimes, September 2012

    • Is Intel's Clover Trail SoC a "bloated nightmare" (fast forward to answer: Y)
      By ibexx88 . Sep 29, 2012 2:09 AM . Permalink
      Intel recently showcased a number of Windows 8 tablets powered by the Atom SoC Z2760, aka "Clover Trail." 

As we've previously discussed on TG Daily, Santa Clara faces an uphill battle in the lucrative mobile space as it attempts to compete against low-power sipping RISC-based chips designed by ARM that currently dominate the smartphone and tablet markets.

      Unfortunately, it doesn't seem like Clover Trail will be helping Intel's mobile campaign anytime soon, at least not according to Silicon Valley tech guru Charlie Charlie Demerjian. 



      "Clover Trail is massive, so big that it is not economically viable in the markets that [Intel] is fighting for," Demerjian wrote in an analysis posted on SemiAccurate.



      "That promise from the last financial analyst day of good margins on Atom in the phone/tablet market would go up in smoke if Intel released the die size, and they know it. Intel can't compete in tablets and phones."



      According to Demerjian, Intel is on its third-generation Atom DX hardware, but still can't get it working properly. As such, Clover Trail is DX9, "while the competition is all DX10 or DX11 and has been for years."



      Demerjian also reported that Clover Trail runs Windows 8 at "barely tolerable speeds" - even with the massive "hardware hacks" Intel allegedly put in place to fake performance. 



      "Bloat the die size, add in vastly more DRAM and storage because Windows needs at least 10x what Android does, and suck far more power to do so, and this is somehow a viable product?" he asked rhetorically.

 "[Seriously], you need a bigger battery to simply attain parity on power driving up the BoM cost yet more."

      

In addition, says Demerjian, Clover Trail is a "locked down" nightmare, as it shuts out Linux and supports a locked bootloader as per Microsoft's specifications. 



      "Intel could have stopped this monstrosity, but didn't even tepidly condemn it. Internally, they know it will fail, SemiAccurate has seen their sales estimates last summer, but wouldn't do anything to make the devices bearing it even marginally palatable.

      

"[Simply put], Intel does not want to sell Clover Trails because of what it will do to their margins - they are desperately afraid of it. It has neither the CPU performance of the smaller die Core iSomethingmeaningless nor the power savings of ARM CPUs. It is vastly more expensive to manufacture and no one wants it," he added. 



      Sentiment: Strong Sell

    • Intel makes cash-over-fist at $20 a chip because they essentially get paid "twice" owning their fabs. Idiots like you & analysts dont understand that concept versus the failed ARM-fabless model. Also, the millions of tablets/smartphone chips that Intel will be flooding the market will also lead to an exponential increase in $300-$500 Intel server chips, which is now 25% of their business & will double in the next few years.

    • Volume for hig margin cpu's goes bust and may pick in $30 soc but bottom line for intel takes beating in margin hell and

      what dividend?

      what about debt at intel?

 
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