Mon, Sep 22, 2014, 8:36 PM EDT - U.S. Markets closed

Recent

% | $
Quotes you view appear here for quick access.

Intel Corporation Message Board

  • wallisweaver wallisweaver Jan 4, 2013 3:03 PM Flag

    "Intel makes this market segment even stronger in 2013..."

    ["Having a Celeron based on Ivy Bridge 22nm just two quarters after the new architecture was introduced looks good."]

    [From Fudzilla...]

    Celeron 1037U and 1007U

    Currently the fastest Celeron that you can get inside of a notebook is the Celeron 887, a Sandy Bridge based 32nm chip. It is a U-series part that sits between 15W and 25W and has two cores.
    The Celeron 887 is a dual-core with two threads and 1.5GHz clock, 350MHz graphics that can clock all the way to 1000MHz, has 2MB of cache, DDR3 1333 support and 17W TDP.

    Intel plans two Ivy Bridge 22nm Celerons to take its place in the lower end market segment called U Dual Core VC1. The one that replaces 887 is called Celeron 1007U and has the same 1.5GHz core clock, two threads, the same graphics, memory and cash size speeds.

    The difference is of course that Ivy Bridge 22nm core should bring some performance boost over the 887 at the same speed and it will generate less heat at the same clock.

    The new processor that will lead this U Dual core VC1 market is called Celeron 1037U and this dual-core with two threads now works at 1.8GHz speed, keeping the thermal envelope at the desirable 17W level. It comes with Intel HD graphics with the same 350 / 1000MHz clocks and it comes with DDR3 1333 support, 2MB cache and 17W TDP.

    With the Celeron 1000 series and Ivy Bridge 22nm dual-cores, Intel makes this market segment even stronger in 2013. Having a Celeron based on Ivy Bridge 22nm just two quarters after the new architecture was introduced looks good.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

 
INTC
34.71-0.11(-0.32%)Sep 22 4:15 PMEDT

Trending Tickers

i
Trending Tickers features significant U.S. stocks showing the most dramatic increase in user interest in Yahoo Finance in the previous hour over historic norms. The list is limited to those equities which trade at least 100,000 shares on an average day and have a market cap of more than $300 million.