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Intel Corporation Message Board

  • sanddollars586 sanddollars586 Feb 14, 2013 4:28 PM Flag

    Will Intel Ultrabooks, Tablets and Smartphones Spy On Us Too?

     

    Earlier this week, Erick Huggers of Intel Media announced the launch of a new Web TV streaming box aimed to deliver live multi-channel video to consumers but with presumbably more flexibility and features than typical cable TV service. It was also revealed that this box contains a controversial videocamera and feature. Mind you, the camera is not necessary for the box to deliver the video service, it is included mainly to capture and record viewers while watching TV and to package up this data so it can be sold to third parties for additional revenue. Now one has to admit that adding a camera to a consumer device that doesn't need one, for the sole purpose of ad-spying is a bit alarming. Is this a rogue Intel project done outside of senior management review? One would certainly hope so because the alternative is to believe that Intel has adopted harvesting consumer's privacy as an accepted business practice and no place is considered too private, and no child too young. If that's the case, are we to expect that new Haswell Ultrabooks or tablets or even smartphones will be built to spy on us too? Intel wouldn't even have to create a pretense why the camera and microphone is there because they are already built-in. And undoubtedly there's a ton of potential revenue for harvesting all that personal data from those ultrabooks and tablets. If ad-spying has become accepted business practice for Intel why would the behavior of its settop box be different from any other device with Intel inside?

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