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Intel Corporation Message Board

  • ideal_invst ideal_invst Sep 24, 2013 8:39 AM Flag

    Worrying trend for the ARM crowd....

    Intel officially launches Bay Trail-T
    Retail availability in Q4

    Intel used IDF 2013 to showcase a number of interesting products and technologies, but Bay Trail stands out as one of the biggest announcements coming from Chipzilla this year.

    Bay Trail-T is now officially out and this tiny SoC is designed with tablets and convertibles in mind. Intel says consumers will be able to pick up the first products based on Z3000-series chips sometime in the fourth quarter. Acer, Asus, Dell, Lenovo and Toshiba are already on board, which is not really news as some of their products were showcased at IDF.

    Intel appears to be pricing its first proper tablet SoC quite aggressively. For example, the Asus Transformer Book T100, which was announced two weeks ago, starts at just $349 with 32GB of storage and 2GB of RAM – yet it packs a quad-core Z3470 processor. Moreover, Intel said its ultimate goal is to come up with Windows 8.1 tablets priced at just $99, although that probably won’t happen anytime soon (think $599 Ultrabooks).

    Bay Trail-T is Intel’s first crack at the tablet market and early benchmarks indicate that it has what it takes to compete with ARM SoCs. The unit price is what counts in this segment, every penny in this high-volume market translates into tens of millions at the end of the day. Companies don’t announce the pricing of their top ARM SoCs, but analysts usually put the price of flagship chips like the Exynos 5 Octa, Snapdragon 800 and Tegra 4 in the $22 to $28 range.

    Intel’s 22nm Z3740 is priced at $32, while the 1.46GHz Z3770 goes for $37. While this isn't on a par with flagship ARM SoCs, the prices are very close.

    This is a rather worrying trend for the ARM crowd. With each new generation Intel gets closer, not only in watts and die size, but more importantly in dollars. Silvermont probably won’t get there, although it is already getting dangerously close, but 14nm Airmont products could pose a serious threat

    Fudzilla

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    • [from investorshub]

      wbmw Member Level Tuesday, September 24, 2013 11:17:43 AM
      Re: Ideal_Inv post# 122962 Post # of 123191

      Quote:
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      This is a rather worrying trend for the ARM crowd. With each new generation Intel gets closer, not only in watts and die size, but more importantly in dollars. Silvermont probably won’t get there, although it is already getting dangerously close, but 14nm Airmont products could pose a serious threat to ARM parts in late 2014.
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Except, Fudzilla has based this comment off of the Intel list price for Bay Trail, which is kind of silly to say the least.

      What they should have reported is that Bay Trail is *already* a worrying part for the ARM crowd, and should win quite a few nice designs in advance of the 14nm parts.

      • 2 Replies to bacbacker
      • Intel officially launches Bay Trail-T
        Retail availability in Q4

        Intel used IDF 2013 to showcase a number of interesting products and technologies, but Bay Trail stands out as one of the biggest announcements coming from Chipzilla this year.

        Bay Trail-T is now officially out and this tiny SoC is designed with tablets and convertibles in mind. Intel says consumers will be able to pick up the first products based on Z3000-series chips sometime in the fourth quarter. Acer, Asus, Dell, Lenovo and Toshiba are already on board, which is not really news as some of their products were showcased at IDF.

        Intel appears to be pricing its first proper tablet SoC quite aggressively. For example, the Asus Transformer Book T100, which was announced two weeks ago, starts at just $349 with 32GB of storage and 2GB of RAM – yet it packs a quad-core Z3470 processor. Moreover, Intel said its ultimate goal is to come up with Windows 8.1 tablets priced at just $99, although that probably won’t happen anytime soon (think $599 Ultrabooks).

        Bay Trail-T is Intel’s first crack at the tablet market and early benchmarks indicate that it has what it takes to compete with ARM SoCs. The unit price is what counts in this segment, every penny in this high-volume market translates into tens of millions at the end of the day. Companies don’t announce the pricing of their top ARM SoCs, but analysts usually put the price of flagship chips like the Exynos 5 Octa, Snapdragon 800 and Tegra 4 in the $22 to $28 range.

        Intel’s 22nm Z3740 is priced at $32, while the 1.46GHz Z3770 goes for $37. While this isn't on a par with flagship ARM SoCs, the prices are very close.

        This is a rather worrying trend for the ARM crowd. With each new generation Intel gets closer, not only in watts and die size, but more importantly in dollars. Silvermont probably won’t get there, although it is already getting dangerously close, but 14nm Airmont products could pose a serious threat

        Fudzilla

      • We will see sub $100 bay trail android tablets in November. That's more than competitive in price

    • Worrying trend for the ARM crowd....
      google "NVDA deeply unhappy with TSMC" ...the article has a nice chart wafer price versus process node...
      pretty sobering

    • Worrying trend for the ARM crowd....
      the worrying trend is the increasing wafer price charged by foundries ...
      google" NVDA deeply unhappy with TSMC" and you'll find a chart that explains all of this
      regarding yield:
      Intel moving to smaller die size (SoC) relative to CPU should result in higher yields
      Assuming similar defect density a defect on a (relatively larger) CPU die destroys more silicon real estate compared to the smaller SoC die ... and Intels 14nm opposite to TSMC is a real shrink.
      And of course a shrink allows to "print" more dies

      Today analysts are "hyping" equipment stocks because complexity in advanced manufacturing is increasing -that was clear to me three years ago - analysts are "slow" and they will be slow in realizing Intel's SoC potential

      OT:
      I don't think the TEL AMAT merger is going to fly

    • Absolutely on the trend but even with that being said tray price doesn't reveal the full picture. Have to also factor Market Development Funds for co-sponsored advertising that lowers the vendor's cost. Once the bigger picture is considered Intel probably already meets or beats ARM's pricing.

 
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