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Intel Corporation Message Board

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  • mikebert mikebert Apr 6, 1998 6:14 PM Flag

    buy on DIPS

    but I bought the dip. What! you say. Aren't the clown with the 65 limit order? Yep that's me. I still have it too. But the market has to recede for me to get that price and I don't think that is going to happen this month. Despite the tech carnage, my market model was UP AGAIN today. Sheesh. I put in an order for 1000 INTC at 74 1/2 (just under the 75 support, where it dipped last time) for for a short term trade.

    After the market's close I check and see that INTC fell to 73 7/8. Hmmm, that's not so good. Maybe I made a mistake. Oh well, one lives and learns. This was my very first intentional short-term trade.

    What do the other traders out there think? After making my first short term play I can see how emotions can run high. I seem to have more emotional cookies riding the 75K in INTC than on the 450K in my long-term portfolio. Does anyone else experience this?

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    • target=new >http://www.techstocks.com/~wsapi/investor/chart?s=intc+amd+nsm+idti&pts=30&span=Days


      Interesting stats. NSM finally pulls into the black for the
      first time in 30 days! Seems like the market like AMD, NSM
      and IDTI for the "potential"...irregardless of the loss.

      Live and learn.

      Mike

    • shouldnt have bought at all at any price on monday.
      bad that it broke 74 as well-which had held intraday.

      stock is acting poorlly, very poorly. Cf. it to microsoft which had some bounce.

      Its nyse against nasdaq since nsm story makes no more sense than amd. yet both rally strongly. after same. June '99 they are
      going to start production. Ridiculous. $400. for panel giving info in your bathroom. I do the same with a telephone-a tv. no
      computing-no interacting. No one apparently has been able to beat intels chip (power pc, alpha, etc.-so the slanderers have decided an
      imaginery future where there is no chip. Public will believe any thing. Nonetheless stock acts poorly. It could be last time down.
      Intel action and others have been known to do it. But I run.

      Probably will try rally in late morning. There are three waves in any day. After immediate opening action-goes other way-then reaction. Midday should see a second try unless reactionary wave takes over.

      Check volumes constantly-good luck. It may be that no one wanted nasdaq to interfere with dow celebration.

    • I am midwestern and same age. I feel exactly the same way when a short term trade looses. I feel worse about the short term loss than a 5 x larger loss in my long term portfolio. Maybe it is age or ego. I'm not sure.

    • Intel was my first short term investment also.

      in at 57; out at 59. 3 times.

      I thought that was a quick 600.00 without work. Then the stock soared and split twice.

      So now I'm in for the long haul. With a lot more than 200 shares.
      70 looks like a very good price for dollar cost averaging. My current bail-out price is 83. I'd like to see that drop to 75 or so....

    • Mikebert,

      I follow my stocks closely, which includes a long-term position of about 1,850 shares in Intel, but I CANNOT understand the point in short-term trading!

      Besides the emotional ups-and-downs, it is probably impossible to call the very short-term or, for that matter, anything shorter than about 1 year. On any given day, good news or bad news will hit a stock. Short-term trading comes close to playing the lottery and can drive you crazy!!. Longer term, I find that the good news and bad news balances out in such a way that good companies will have more good news over time and, thus, increasing earnings and increasing share prices.

      Short-term trading also has three other distinct disadvantages:

      1) Taxes at the "standard" income tax rate, rather than the long-term capital gains rate, which is probably going to be dropped further in the coming years.

      2) On days when Intel, or whatever, drops $2 or $3/share, I can, at least, hold to the thought that, even with today's drop,
      I still have a gain in Intel of about $75K. Thus, I find that I can still be way ahead even after a rotten day for Intel. If I
      short-term traded, I would be in the red on a regular basis, and that could hurt!!! My long-term portfolio, and I really have no other
      kind, is ahead about $700K. Viewing today's drop in Intel against everything gained in the past couple of years, longer-term
      trading allows one to put into prospective the rough spots, such as Intel is now experiencing. It's simply too small a percentage to
      matter and I don't think that Intel is quite ready yet to fold its tent and go under!.

      When you short-term trade, you are betting that you will be right at a given point in time about a particular company; longer-term, it doesn't matter if your timing is off, as long as you're right about the company.

      3) I have never been convinced that anyone can time the market with sufficient efficiency to justify the time and effort spent researching, handling the emotionality of the daily ups and downs, and the significantly greater tax consequences. No one likes to realize a capital loss. Short-term trading often requires that, while longer-term, one normally doesn't have to realize losses, though it sometimes happens, anyway!

 
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