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Dana Corporation (DCN) Message Board

  • santocap santocap Apr 14, 1999 3:08 PM Flag

    upward bound

    Based on the strong volume and analyst recommendations, this stock should hit $60 by the end of April.

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    • I agree with your point that product problems and
      lost business will hurt revenue, but go back and
      re-read your link. Chrysler did not put all the blame on
      Dana:

      "American Axle declined to comment on the speculation.
      DaimlerChrysler spokesman Jack Ferry said that 'Dana wasn't
      100-percent responsible for the axle problem.'"

    • Product problems will eventually affect the
      profitability of any company and, in the long run, the stock
      price. Chrysler says the axle problem is Dana's fault
      according to this
      link.http://www.auto.com/industry/axle14_19991214.htm

    • This probably isn't the forum for product
      complaints. If the dealer replaced an entire axle and the
      noise is still there, it wasn't the axle. By the way,
      that noise is probably spelled whine. As an aside,
      what you are probably hearing is tire noise. That is
      common to the larger truck tires used on an SUV.

    • Did you ever get your Jeep fixed. My dealer has replaced the entire rear end assembly on my 2000 JGC and the axle wine still there.

    • <<I am guessing that they use this

      hydromechanical setup to "sense" when the front shaft needs to
      turn so that 4WD can
      engage and disengage
      automatically.>> Well, sort of. The actual operating principle is
      the same -- when a speed difference is presented
      (front vs. rear propshaft, and either can be faster) the
      internal gerotor pump does the same trick and a
      wet-friction pack is engaged which now allows power transfer
      to the front wheels. Rear wheel power is via the
      traditional T-case gearing. Better, more room in the T-case;
      can be a very substantial coupling transferring lots
      of power. A drawback: difficulting in actually
      locking front and rear shafts for HD off-roading -- makes
      for a complex and expensive package. <<I can't
      see anybody wanting to put this
      technology on
      anything other than SUVs and sports cars just like all the
      mechanical
      limited slips that are offered right now. It's no
      mechanical engineering breakthrough
      I'll tell you
      that.>> Versus the "junk" that has been and continues to
      be used on production cars/trucks?? Tried out a Ford
      LSD lately?? Still, you're partially right...
      gerotors in differentials are NOT new as a simple patent
      search will attest. And yes, MCLN/ASHA seems only a
      one-trick deal. Hmmm... a better idea..??

    • i want to pass on this stock research site that's been helping me keep up with the changes. well done, and best of all, free! http://www2.cybercities.com/s/stockland/
      go DCN!

    • Thanks for the reply. Now how does this type of
      technology get implemented in a transfer case. I am not that
      familiar with the Jeep GC. I am guessing that they use
      this hydromechanical setup to "sense" when the front
      shaft needs to turn so that 4WD can engage and
      disengage automatically. Maybe somebody has some insight
      into how it works in there.

      Also, limited slip
      differentials are not new, and there is nothing spectacularily
      different about the hydralok that would suggest that it has
      applications beyond semi-aggressive sport utility drivers. I
      can't see anybody wanting to put this technology on
      anything other than SUVs and sports cars just like all the
      mechanical limited slips that are offered right now. It's no
      mechanical engineering breakthrough I'll tell you that.

      The whole of Dana is not hinged on this thing, unlike
      the folks at MCLN.

    • So, here's a shot at it. As I understand it, the
      Hydra-lok is simply the Dana trade name for the original
      Gerodisc type technology, licensed by Dana way back when
      but, as everyone now knows, recently cancelled. Over
      time, Dana (of course) has made copious design changes
      and mods, presumably to render it more suitable for
      production processes, and reduce cost. "Hydra-lok" then, is
      best described as a hydromechanical coupling that
      employs the sump fluid as the working media. The internal
      gerotor pump provides a hydraulic head, which acts on a
      piston, which engages a wet friction clutch pack and
      attempts to bring the two differing shaft speeds to equal
      velocity. Your're right in that it doesn't truly lock... in
      fact by design, it can't. So, what you have here is a
      "partial" lock type operation, but it only happens when the
      two shaft speeds significantly differ.

    • we'll see 50 first...It looks as though a market correction is underway.

    • With the stock ending the week at $52 and change. Which number will we see first $50 or $55? and why?

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