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eBay Inc. Message Board

  • HereditaryPeer HereditaryPeer Aug 1, 1999 10:01 PM Flag

    Anybody short

    this stock? LOL

    SortNewest  |  Oldest  |  Most Replied Expand all replies
    • to 2ndfloortrader or HereditaryBroker or
      wallstreetinsider or some such and start to dispense good solid
      stock advice to help all those unfortunate soles on
      this board who do not have clue and are looking for
      direction anywhere they can find it. Than again, maybe I
      will keep my name and just continue to exercise my pie
      hole and annoy those who are most easily annoyed. You
      know the ones I am talking about? The ones that are
      the most insecure about their present position. The
      pros.

    • <EOM>>

    • this will be ugly

      call in the doctors from e.r.

    • rancher. What advice did I give? I offer no advice and express only my honest opinions and yes, I am amateur. The stock market is not my profession. Heaven forbid.

    • doing a garage sale. Nothing but luck so far but future
      will be a crap.
      EBAY true value less than 25 cents.
      I wish all EBAY longs all die very soon. Fuck them all.

    • small short interest is the most bearish thing I have heard yet. Remember when stocks move they take as few riders as they can.

    • In this difficult environment, says Michael
      Murphy, editor of the Overpriced Stock Service newsletter
      in Half Moon Bay, Calif., "most of the short sellers
      have gotten very good at putting very tight 'stop
      losses' in," that is, closing out their losses when stock
      prices rise to a certain level instead of letting the
      losses grow.

      One area that has made money for
      short sellers recently has been airline stocks, which
      have declined because of rising fuel prices and unused
      capacity. The stock of US Airways Group has fallen to 35
      5/8 from 64 in January on the New York Stock
      Exchange. UAL, parent of United Airlines, has dropped to 63
      7/16 from 87 3/8 on the Big Board.

      But in many
      cases, short sellers have steered clear of large,
      blue-chip stocks, which have outperformed smaller stocks
      for four years running, and which they charge rise
      simply as money flows into index funds.

      Despite
      occasional successes, rising stock prices overall mean it is
      still a tough slog for short sellers, who take umbrage
      at the prices investors are willing to pay now for
      stocks. "The U.S. economy has been in an unusual sweet
      spot for the last several years," hedge-fund manager
      (and frequent, though not exclusive, short seller)
      David Rocker wrote to partners of his hedge fund in its
      second-quarter report. Mr. Rocker's partnership had a loss of
      1.9% in the second quarter but gained 29% in the first
      quarter (both returns are after fees). But Mr. Rocker
      reported signs that the positive "trends appear to be
      reversing," and "the persistence of this favorable climate
      must now be questioned."

      Hope springs eternal.

    • So why haven't more short sellers been making hay
      on the Internet's decline? Because they tried so
      many times before -- and got burned. Some Internet
      stocks that have attracted shorts, such as Network
      Solutions, trade for less now than at year end. But many
      Internet stock prices are still up sharply since Dec. 31:
      Shares of eBay, for instance, are up some 21% this
      year.

      "Shorting the Internet stocks has not been a healthy thing
      to do this year," Mr. Strunk says.

      David
      Tice, manager of Prudent Bear Fund, agrees that "you
      had to be extraordinarily skilled tactically to do
      well" shorting Internet and tech stocks this year.
      While Amazon.com has declined, "you had to be out of
      the way at the right time" when it was rising.
      Moreover, tech stocks tied to personal computers, such as
      chip makers Intel and Micron Technology, have shown a
      discouraging [to short sellers] resistance, Mr. Tice says.
      "Micron fell quite a while, but it rallied significantly
      since then," he says. Other managers cite strength in
      Dell Computer and Gateway as having tripped them up.
      Prudent Bear Fund, a mutual fund that frequently shorts
      stocks, had a negative total return of 19% this
      year.

      One problem that Mr. Tice and other short sellers
      complain about: The stocks they are trying to short seem
      to run up sharply in a burst of enthusiasm (or,
      perhaps, a "short squeeze") right before they decline,
      making them difficult to short profitably. Other money
      managers complain that their prices seem to run up at the
      very end of the day before the close.

    • short Thang. I'm sorry but the more I read you the more I see your an Amatuer. Which is OK , buy your giving advice and that is wrong. Leave these poor people alone hav'nt they lost enough.

    • Short Sellers Receive a Break
      But Struggle to
      Gain Benefits
      By ROBERT MCGOUGH
      Staff Reporter
      of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL


      Some of the
      stocks that short sellers love to hate have finally
      declined -- but a lot of these doubting-Thomas investors
      have been either too scared, or too broke, to short
      them.

      The past 4 1/2 years, which have been a boon to so
      many investors buying stocks, have been a disaster for
      most short sellers, who profit when stocks go down.
      Short sellers sell borrowed shares, in the hope they
      can buy them back at lower prices and pocket the
      difference. Sharply rising stock prices have handed these
      "shorts" extensive losses.

      Last year, an index of
      short-selling managers, compiled by Harry Strunk, an investment
      consultant in Palm Beach, Fla., who tracks short-seller
      performance, declined 11.51%. The Standard & Poor's 500-stock
      index, in contrast, had a total return of 28.58%,
      including those teeny dividends that companies pay
      nowadays. This year through June, the short-seller index
      has fallen an additional 3.87%.

      But since the
      spring, some of the short sellers' favorite targets,
      Internet stocks, have been dropping. Internet-related
      stocks are a favorite target of short sellers because of
      their sky-high prices relative to sales and, if they
      have any, earnings. Yahoo! has fallen from as high as
      244 in March to 136 7/16 Friday on the Nasdaq Stock
      Market. Shares of eBay have fallen to 97 11/16, also on
      Nasdaq, from 234 in late April. America Online has fallen
      to 97 1/8 from as high as 175 1/2 in the spring on
      the New York Stock Exchange.

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