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Herbalife Ltd. Message Board

  • singhlion2001 singhlion2001 Mar 27, 2013 9:19 PM Flag

    THIS PROVES THAT MF PROVEN CRIMINAL #$%$ CARL ICAHN IS A CHEAT AND LIAR: ATTACKING HONEST RESEARCH BY ACKMAN

    Last month the legendary activist investor upped his stake in Herbalife in exchange for receiving two board seats. Icahn also received the authority to raise his investment to up to 25%.
    “We conducted considerable research on Herbalife and its business before making our investment in the company, and have great respect for its board and management team, and believe in the company's great potential,” Icahn said in a statement on February 28.

    Sentiment: Strong Sell

    SortNewest  |  Oldest  |  Most Replied Expand all replies
    • singsliar, Do you want to spread your cheeks, like Billy Boi will be doing, BIG MOUTHED trash poster?
      I, Icahn, will squash the two of you like the filty little cockroaches that you are.
      Perhaps you two can cuddle together in an alley, under a bridge or in a homeless shelter?

      Sentiment: Strong Buy

      • 1 Reply to icahn_the_icon
      • singhlion2001 • Mar 30, 2013 6:35 PM 0users liked this postsusers disliked this posts1Reply
        RED ALERT: ANY ONE STILL HAS ANY DOUBT THAT "HLF" IS NOT PYRAMID SCAM?Income At Home, Herbalife, and the $8 billion pyramid Exposing the iconic brand behind Scamworld’s most visible ‘biz opp’
        Income At Home, Herbalife, and the $8 billion pyramid
        Exposing the iconic brand behind Scamworld’s most visible ‘biz opp’
        By Matt Stroud

        Read this Investigation: Game Over.

        Roaring Salute to ACMKMAN

        Upline, downline
        As a regular reader of The Verge, you probably know that Herbalife is what’s known as a multi-level marketing company (MLM). Instead of dealing directly with franchises, an MLM distributes products through a network of independent distributors.

        To understand how MLMs differ from conventional franchising, let’s go back to Wendy’s for a moment. If you wanted to take advantage of the business opportunity afforded by the home of the Frosty (which is not a pyramid scheme), you’d become a franchisee — you’d pay Wendy’s to use its name and products for your own restaurant. The path would begin in a pretty straightforward way: email the company, and they’ll get you started.

        If you wanted to work with Herbalife, however, the company would put you in touch with an independent distributor — someone outside the company. The term itself, "distributor," conjures images of, well, distribution — handling products. And Herbalife would love it if you actually believed that you could earn a great living if only you worked hard and sold the #$%$ out of things like cell activator pills and body buffing scrub. Just like Shawn Dahl did.

        The real nature of his success, however, is embodied by two key MLM terms: upline and downline. Simply put, if you signed up for Herbalife today — and please don’t — you wouldn’t interact with the company at all. You’d interact with the person who recruited you: your "upline." (And if you started recruiting distributors yourself, they would be your "downline.") Since you’re restocking through your upline, it’s the person who recruited you in the first place who receives a commission from any sale that you make. Or any sale you fail to make, as long as you keep placing orders.

        There’s no guarantee that any of those leads will pan out, of course,
        but the opportunity’s there
        The first step with Online Business Systems is purchasing something called the Internet Startup Kit. This is the same thing that Income At Home sold Barron Hansen. If you go to either of those websites at the time of this writing, the ordering page clearly states that you can try the kit risk free for 14 days, if you pay $9.95 shipping and handling. After two weeks, if you don’t return the kit, you’re charged the full $39.95 price. According to Hansen and several others, the terms weren’t always that clear: the web is full of complaints made by people who thought they were paying $9.95 for something that cost five times that.

        If you’re still with the program, you’ll receive a call from a "mentor," which is little more than someone who was recently in your position. They bought the kit, liked what they heard, and stuck with it long enough to purchase your name from Online Business Systems. Hopefully, they’re having less luck than their mentor did.

        The next step in the process is to sign you up as an Herbalife distributor. Outside of Dahl’s "system," this will cost you something in the $100 range. But with Online Business Systems, the price is $399.

        And what if you want to start your own downline? In order to do that, you need to become a supervisor. This requires other product purchases, where you’ll spend up to $4,000. With this investment, you’ll receive a ton of sales tools and advice from Shawn Dahl’s team, some of which may be helpful. But unfortunately you won’t get any sales leads. And you can’t really sell Herbalife without anyone to sell Herbalife to.

        Cheap leads cost about $6. But if you want the good leads, the Barron Hansen-quality leads — that is, people who have responded to Glenn Beck’s radio ads and typed their credit card numbers into a website purporting to provide business information — you’re paying closer to $100 a head.

        There’s no guarantee that any of those leads will pan out, of course, but the opportunity’s there. And, by the way, you’ll also want to buy a website to sell your products and attract new distributors. That’ll run you $79.95 per month. Less
        Sentiment: Strong Sell

        Sentiment: Strong Sell

    • Maybe you could help Master Hackman learn his math - NOT. You're just a Drone - mindless tool.

      • 2 Replies to gordito1954
      • Multi-Level Marketing Income Disclosures
        31 December 2012
        Some multi-level marketing (MLM) companies release income disclosures or earnings disclosures. These documents theoretically provide insight into how much distributors earn in commissions or overrides.

        However, the disclosures are generally worthless. What is more important than the information in these documents? The information that is not disclosed in the documents.

        Multilevel marketing companies purposely omit important information that would allow potential distributors or investors to have real insight into these plans. In general, earnings disclosure statements often fail to provide the following information that is critical to understanding the plans and the results

        Total distributors throughout the year
        How the total distributor count is calculated (as of a certain date, using averages, or other methodology)
        Number of new distributors during the year
        Number of distributors who quit during the year
        Turnover rate
        Number of distributors earning $0
        Definition of “active” distributor
        Total number of distributors at a supervisor or leader level (i.e. have recruited other distributors)
        Total number of “active” distributors at a supervisor or leader level
        Amount of product purchased by each level of distributor for the year
        Below are links to the earnings disclosures found for various multi-level marketin

        Sentiment: Strong Sell

      • singhlion2001 • Mar 30, 2013 6:35 PM 0users liked this postsusers disliked this posts1Reply
        RED ALERT: ANY ONE STILL HAS ANY DOUBT THAT "HLF" IS NOT PYRAMID SCAM?Income At Home, Herbalife, and the $8 billion pyramid Exposing the iconic brand behind Scamworld’s most visible ‘biz opp’
        Income At Home, Herbalife, and the $8 billion pyramid
        Exposing the iconic brand behind Scamworld’s most visible ‘biz opp’
        By Matt Stroud

        Read this Investigation: Game Over.

        Roaring Salute to ACMKMAN

        Upline, downline
        As a regular reader of The Verge, you probably know that Herbalife is what’s known as a multi-level marketing company (MLM). Instead of dealing directly with franchises, an MLM distributes products through a network of independent distributors.

        To understand how MLMs differ from conventional franchising, let’s go back to Wendy’s for a moment. If you wanted to take advantage of the business opportunity afforded by the home of the Frosty (which is not a pyramid scheme), you’d become a franchisee — you’d pay Wendy’s to use its name and products for your own restaurant. The path would begin in a pretty straightforward way: email the company, and they’ll get you started.

        If you wanted to work with Herbalife, however, the company would put you in touch with an independent distributor — someone outside the company. The term itself, "distributor," conjures images of, well, distribution — handling products. And Herbalife would love it if you actually believed that you could earn a great living if only you worked hard and sold the #$%$ out of things like cell activator pills and body buffing scrub. Just like Shawn Dahl did.

        The real nature of his success, however, is embodied by two key MLM terms: upline and downline. Simply put, if you signed up for Herbalife today — and please don’t — you wouldn’t interact with the company at all. You’d interact with the person who recruited you: your "upline." (And if you started recruiting distributors yourself, they would be your "downline

 
HLF
37.90+0.16(+0.42%)Dec 18 4:01 PMEST

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