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The Coca-Cola Company Message Board

  • uglyduck555 uglyduck555 May 15, 2005 9:10 PM Flag

    QWAK,the party is almost OVER!

    QWAK,Dog,I think you may find this of intrist.

    Personaly I think most people and governments here in the USA are in for BIG trouble, how ever it may also offer OPERTUNITIES for iniviguals who have NO DEBT problems and have prepositioned to exploit the advantage of having SAVED and who have CASH, when CREDIT stops or gets very expencive.

    http://www.investing-news.com/artman/publish/article_845.shtml

    The LIVE for today and let tomarrow take care of it self,life style is a very BAD PLAN, when tomarrow comes and it DAWNS on them how deep in DEBT they actualy are!

    the DUCK

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    • REGARDING: Michael, you are so correct. Bond holders are 'more accurate'. Kinda like race car drivers are more precise than you and me. Yet all get in accidents. What's your point? I sure hope that when one decides to evaluate a bond purchase, one considers what the impact of inflation will be. In the meantime, you argue one doesn't need to do this. ...and the hole you are digging just keeps getting deeper.

      RESPONSE: MY "hole"??????!!!!
      You have dug your hole so deep, you will need a construction crew to build you the necessary steps to enable you to see the light of day.
      You have confirmed my comment that you are "consistent".

      NOTE: The interest rate has factored all the elements that affect rates, INCLUDING "anticipated INFLATION".
      Duh!!!!!
      LOL

      NO MORE SOUP FOR YOU!!!!!
      NEXT...........

    • Michael, you are so correct. Bond holders are 'more accurate'. Kinda like race car drivers are more precise than you and me. Yet all get in accidents. What's your point? I sure hope that when one decides to evaluate a bond purchase, one considers what the impact of inflation will be. In the meantime, you argue one doesn't need to do this. ...and the hole you are digging just keeps getting deeper.

    • REGARDING: Michael, I asked you how you 'valued' bonds. You gave your approach. It had no review of inflation! I questioned how you could value a bond without considering how inflation will impact its value, and you said 'inflation' is baked into the interest rate. That's like saying 'earnings' are baked into the stock price. Both are wrong. You are wrong. But keep digging your hole. It's nice to see robots at work. Gives entertainment to humans.

      RESPONSE: You are, sadly and shockingly, unbelievable!!!
      Yet....., you appear to be very consistent.
      LOL

      ATTEMPT TO EDUCATE, CLASS 1A (Interest rates):
      The debt market is quite substantial regarding number and quality of participants.
      The current rate for any U.S. debt instrument is established by ALL perceptions, resulting in that momentary rate.
      There are not too many lay purchasers, who have the indigenous wherewithal to KNOW if that momentary rate will hold.
      The resultant pricings of U.S. notes and bonds
      are more "accurate" than the pricings of any individual common stock, since the number and quality of the participants are substantially higher.

    • Michael, I asked you how you 'valued' bonds. You gave your approach. It had no review of inflation! I questioned how you could value a bond without considering how inflation will impact its value, and you said 'inflation' is baked into the interest rate. That's like saying 'earnings' are baked into the stock price. Both are wrong. You are wrong. But keep digging your hole. It's nice to see robots at work. Gives entertainment to humans.

    • REGARDING: My point stands... there has to be an independent analysis of where inflation is going.

      RESPONSE: You persist in painting yourself as an economic novice.
      Who do you assume will offer the "independent analysis of WHERE INFLATION IS GOING"???
      LOL

      Ha, ha, ha......... You are one funny dude!!!
      Are you a sit-down comic???

    • woodstein, I do believe that long term interest rates may stay unusually low for another year or two. I have also been of this view for 4 years now, even as I have anticipated higher inflation. I disagree with your use of the 10 yr. bond as an inflation indicator, just as I have disagreed with Michael's ability to disregard inflation expectations when valuing a long term bond investment. When USD$ liquidity is everywhere and worldwide, and a speculator community flush with funds, I see no reason for 10 yr. bonds to drop in price. In fact, I see the opposite and that is what is happening. Consider that 10 year rates have been dropping for years now, and inflation has doubled in the past couple of years, what I see is not the 10 year signalling inflation, but the 10 yr showing non traditional forces are moving it. I think you need to update your models for today's world.

    • woodstein, many people buy what their broker sells them. My point stands... there has to be an independent analysis of where inflation is going. One shouldn't trust 'the market' and feel that inflation is baked into the interest rate paid on a bond. That's ridiculous, and the thought comes from a preacher with personal agenda. Michael knows what he said is stupid when the glare of the headlights shines on his argument. He'll keep digging his hole, though...

    • REGARDING: Michael, utter nonsense. Ask the bond buyers of the mid '70s how stupid your below comment is when they tried to cash out for their retirement expenses just a half dozen years later!

      RESPONSE: You can't be as naive as you portray yourself!!! Can you??
      Ask those who purchased U.S. bonds in the late 70's and early 80's if they were happy!

      By the way, no one KNOWS what the future holds; one can only ANTICIPATE. That anticipated projected inflation is taken into consideration every day.

    • QWAK, woodstein2002, We will have BOTH inflation and deflation the WORST of BOTH sad to say. The things people pay for fast with cash (althow most use credit cards) like food,energy,insurance and medications are going up FAST and HIGH.

      The BIG things people buy on credit like houses and cars etc. will fall as the CHEEP CREDIT from Asia is turned off.

      There may be times when one or the other seems to me the main event but actualy BOTH will be chewing on us untill we reach parady with the rest of the world ---- GLOBAL ECONOMY remember?

      I got to also figure looking back at HISTORY and knowing ECONOMICS and MONEY are what WAR is realy about,that it is HIGHLY LIKELY we will also see somthing we may call WW3,most likely the seeds are already growing and they don't grow with WATER the now grow with OIL!

      the DUCK

    • Wood,

      I wondered about this in the past as it seemed many companies seriously struggle to raise prices. Now worldwide competition places even more stress on prices to the upside and downside. Examples"UP"-World demand for oil we're led to believe forcing prices up as demand outstrips supply....."Down" China textile exports forces pricing down on same.

      What is one to make of this?

      Best,
      Dog

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