Tue, Jul 22, 2014, 6:09 PM EDT - U.S. Markets closed

Recent

% | $
Click the to save as a favorite.

The Coca-Cola Company Message Board

  • azalphainvestor azalphainvestor Feb 3, 2006 3:32 AM Flag

    duck is a false god

    As gold comes to the fore as this years investment flavor, some, mostly the Duck himself, have come to think him knowledgable and even some clairvoiant. While a bit long, here is the view from a knowledgable business pulblication, Business Week:

    FEBRUARY 13, 2006

    COVER STORY
    By Michael Mandel, with Steve Hamm in New York and Christopher J. Farrell in St. Paul, Minn.

    Why The Economy Is A Lot Stronger Than You Think
    In a knowledge-based world, the traditional measures don't tell the story. Intangibles like R&D are tracked poorly, if at all. Factor them in and everything changes

    podcast
    COVER STORY PODCAST

    You read this magazine religiously, watch CNBC while dressing for work, scan the Web for economic reports. You've heard, over and over, about the underlying problems with the U.S. economy -- the paltry investment rate, the yawning current account deficit, the pathetic amount Americans salt away. And you know what the experts are saying: that the U.S. faces a perilous economic future unless we cut back on spending and change our profligate ways.

    But what if we told you that the doomsayers, while not definitively wrong, aren't seeing the whole picture? What if we told you that businesses are investing about $1 trillion a year more than the official numbers show? Or that the savings rate, far from being negative, is actually positive? Or, for that matter, that our deficit with the rest of the world is much smaller than advertised, and that gross domestic product may be growing faster than the latest gloomy numbers show? You'd be pretty surprised, wouldn't you?

    Slide Show >>
    Well, don't be. Because the economy you thought you knew -- the one all those government statistics purport to measure and make rational and understandable -- actually may be on a stronger footing than you think. Then again, it could be much more volatile than before, with bigger booms and deeper busts. If true, that has major implications for policymakers -- not least Ben Bernanke, who on Feb. 1 succeeded Alan Greenspan as chairman of the Federal Reserve.

    Everyone knows the U.S. is well down the road to becoming a knowledge economy, one driven by ideas and innovation. What you may not realize is that the government's decades-old system of number collection and crunching captures investments in equipment, buildings, and software, but for the most part misses the growing portion of GDP that is generating the cool, game-changing ideas. "As we've become a more knowledge-based economy," says University of Maryland economist Charles R. Hulten, "our statistics have not shifted to capture the effects."

    and on to for the rest of the article:

    http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/06_07/b3971001.htm?campaign_id=rss_
    magzn


    alpha

    SortNewest  |  Oldest  |  Most Replied Expand all replies
 
KO
41.19-1.21(-2.85%)Jul 22 4:00 PMEDT

Trending Tickers

i
Trending Tickers features significant U.S. stocks showing the most dramatic increase in user interest in Yahoo Finance in the previous hour over historic norms. The list is limited to those equities which trade at least 100,000 shares on an average day and have a market cap of more than $300 million.