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  • uglyduck555 uglyduck555 Jul 25, 2007 8:22 AM Flag

    QWAK,told you ths was coming!

    QWAK,I told you THIS was coming years ago but every one said the DUCK was OVER REACTING and EXAGERATING.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/25/business/25lend.html?th&emc=th

    We are a lot closer to the begining then the end --- it WILL get WORSE, much worse!

    the DUCK

    SortNewest  |  Oldest  |  Most Replied Expand all replies
    • QWAK,one eye,Agen you demonstrate your STUPIDITY by taking LITERLY a figure of SPEACH with a much diferent meaning!

      You REALY should just shut up rather than PROVING to every one how STUPID you actualy are!

      Enough of THIS, you are becoming excessivly BORING!

      the DUCK

    • Regards: DUCKS often eat WORMS for BREAKFAST!

      Response: I can respect that Donald. However, previously you said, "The WORM is a bit DIFERENT--- it is just fun to step on and SQUISH it! :) Must go back to my child hood I guess, walking to school after a rain and steping on WORMS on the side walk! HA HA HA HE HE HE".

      See ..... http://messages.finance.yahoo.com/Business_%26_Finance/Investments/Stocks_%28A_to_Z%29/Stocks_C/threadview?bn=10352&tid=113579&mid=113600

      So you eat worms too as well as squish them?

      Squiglly wormy One Eye , )

      P.S. How often do you play with dumbozo's worm???

    • QWAK,one eye WORM,IF you understood NATURE you would know that DUCKS often EAT WORMS, it is a part of a wholesome diet for DUCKS.

      DUCKS often eat WORMS for BREAKFAST!

      Aparently DUCKS love eating WORMS but some how the WORMS just don't feel that LOVE. Go figure! :)

      LOL
      the DUCK

    • Regards: QWAK,I told you and so did J4D for YEARS that THIS was coming and you ALL BLASTED US for our efforts to WARN of this NOW obvious DANGER!

      Resposne: #2 Son Donald. You finally have spoken about your posts of the past 6 years in which you and dumbozo tried to SCARE THE $HIT out of everyone.

      The moment has arrived and you and dumbozo are basking in the glory of your 6 year pronouncements.

      But let's get real Donald. It did take 6 years and you and dumbozo posted endlessly about debt, savings, and housing. How long can you 'CRY WOLF' or 'THE SKY IS FALLING' before you tune everyone out?

      Tuned out One Eye I-Opener , )

      P.S. It's still not the 'END OF THE WORLD'. This is a welcome correction not only in the stock market but also the housing market.

    • QWAK,I told you and so did J4D for YEARS that THIS was coming and you ALL BLASTED US for our efforts to WARN of this NOW obvious DANGER!

      http://patrick.net/housing/crash.html

      NOW it is HERE and the the size of the problem expanding at an alarming rate which WILL impact on every one in ways totaly over looked and unexpected.

      Time to HUNKER DOWN and it has been that time for several years, the STORM has started in earnest and can be expected to continue for most longer than most can HOLD ON! :(

      the DUCK

    • RE: In the last five years, Mr. Mozilo has exercised options and sold shares for a profit of nearly $380 million, according to data compiled by Thomson Financial. Starting last fall, Mr. Mozilo significantly increased the number of shares he was selling on a regular basis for profits of more than $130 million.

      >> wonder if he used the proceeds to buy Gold & Silver

    • A typical major real estate correction takes seven years to run its course. So if the current correction, and this one has all the typical symptoms of a correction, has started in 2005, then house prices will not really start to recover until 2012 or so.

      That said, demand for housing will not decrease. All the people who will be losing their homes will still need similar homes to live in. They will just be paying somebody else's mortage instead of paying their own.

      • 2 Replies to bush_is_a_sharon_puppet
      • QWAK,bush,The flaw in your statment "All the people who will be losing their homes will still need similar homes to live in." is that people become acustomed to living far beyond their means and can NOT afford "SIMILAR HOMES" so will either have to double and triple up or live in tents and card board boxes under high way over passes.

        It SUCKS but IS the greater reality!

        In the passed people did with out and SAVED UP to BUY but that way is unacceptable to most people today.

        They have been conditioned to believe to BUY as much as posable and that a house IS an INVESTMENT that will ONLY increase in value, when in reality houses DEPRECIATE and must constently be maintained and upgraded.

        With out any actual SAVINGS to smoth over the hard spots when the inevitable hard times arive they become ROAD KILL and lose the house and most of every thing else that they could NOT actualy afford in the first place.

        the DUCK

    • Oct 3, 2003 comments

      "in a fiew years and buy houses for $.10 on the dollar at current selling price after the coming economic crash caused by massive debt and the dirivitives market"

      "Corse by then GOLD will be at well over $1000.00 an oz."

      http://messages.finance.yahoo.com/Business_%26_Finance/Investments/Stocks_%28A_to_Z%29/Stocks_C/threadview?bn=10352&tid=57550&mid=57615

      One Eye . \

    • Comments on Oct 3, 2003

      "in a fiew years and buy houses for $.10 on the dollar at current selling price after the coming economic crash caused by massive debt and the dirivitives market"

    • QWAK,Getting BAD and will get WORSE!

      Foreclosures soar in California
      By David Streitfeld, Times Staff Writer
      9:22 PM PDT, July 24, 2007

      LOS ANGELES � A sagging real estate market and tighter lending standards are exacting a growing toll on Californians, forcing them from their homes in record numbers, figures released Tuesday show.

      Foreclosures soared to 17,408 for the three months ended June 30, an increase of 799 percent from the same period last year. The current rate handily exceeds the previous foreclosure peak set in 1996, when the state was in the final throes of six-year slump.

      Separately, Countrywide Financial Corp. -- the nation's largest mortgage lender -- reported a sharp rise in delinquencies, even among customers with good credit. That sent shivers down Wall Street, helping to trigger a 226-point plunge in the Dow Jones industrial average.

      Although a relatively small fraction of homeowners face eviction, the concern is that a flood of foreclosures will further weaken housing prices -- and make people less willing to spend money.

      "The economy will bend further under the weight of the mounting housing and mortgage problems, but it will not break," said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Economy.com.

      That's what passes for optimism these days. Others are more downbeat.

      "All the artificial stimulus housing gave the economy is going to go away," said Rich Toscano, a financial adviser with Pacific Capital Associates in San Diego who runs the popular Piggington.com real estate Web site. "There will be individual pain for people who made the wrong decisions. We all may end up in a recession."

      The good news, as seen by Toscano: "I don't envision a 'Grapes of Wrath' scenario where we all have to pile in the family car and look for harvesting work."

      Paula Walton said the Carson house she bought in 2003 was due to be foreclosed Wednesday. She first asked her lender for leniency, pointing out that she has endured a series of personal setbacks that included ovarian cancer, her mother's illness and her partner's walking out.

      "I was begging and pleading, 'Please lower the payments so I can get back on my feet,' " said Walton, 43, a clerk on the Long Beach docks.

      The lender didn't budge, Walton said, so she filed for bankruptcy to keep her house, at least for the moment.

      Ester Cadavid of Los Angeles Neighborhood Housing Services, a not-for-profit lender and counselor that is trying to assist Walton, said the Carson resident was an example of how default woes were spreading.

      "In the beginning, we were thinking the foreclosures were going to be limited to low-income, high-minority neighborhoods targeted by predatory lenders," Cadavid said. "Now we're seeing a shift to the middle class."

      That assessment was bolstered by Countrywide's warning that a rising number of its mortgage customers were behind in their payments, including mainstream borrowers.

      The Calabasas-based company said that 4.6 percent of its good-credit customers with lines of credit or home equity loans were at least 30 days delinquent, up sharply from 3.8 percent three months ago. A year ago, the rate was 1.8 percent.

      Most analysts say the housing market won't stabilize until 2008 or 2009. The so-called soft landing that was much talked about last year is rarely mentioned anymore.

      The rising foreclosure rate is tied to stricter lending standards and weakening home values. With housing prices flat or falling, lenders are less willing to refinance loans -- especially to borrowers with shaky credit who are most likely to miss payments.

      http://www.latimes.com/business/la-m...0,331109.story

 
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