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Educational Development Corporation Message Board

  • mnplumb mnplumb Nov 9, 2003 9:22 PM Flag

    Ratings,stock radar screens,rules,

    etc.,etc. According to the experts,don't buy low price stocks,buy liquid stocks,buy stocks that funds are buying,buy only the top big stocks,own only 5 to 8 stocks,the list goes on and on. MSN has EDUC at a rating of 4. IBD has EDUC at eps of 68,rs of 24. I do own a lot of stocks, over 30 of them,EDUC being my biggest one in $$$ amount. If I had only one thing to find a good company like EDUC it would be ROE. The next thing would be sales increasing with real earnings or eps. As for all the rules,I think you should be aware of them but remember rules are made to be broken!!! I hope that the upcoming earnings and sales report is great. SEE YA

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    • Theme, I agree with everything in that post; the state of the world and personal financial matters; the needed EDUC stock PR work, comments about active pursuit of sales efforts. Having a few more institutional buyers coming along would be nice for everyone. EDUC now has ONE large >5% shareholder (Chris's firm - Winston Advisors), plus of course Randall himself holds the biggest share at 29% of outstanding. Many companies, more established, have 50% or more in institutional holders, so it's not like EDUC has been over-discovered!

      I remember reading that Warren Buffett doesn't have a stock ticker machine (do they still use those?) or any interest in checking his holdings on a daily basis. The World's Greatest Investor doesn't even know his companies market value. Why does he care what the market thinks, as he's knows those companies intrinsic value, and the only time the stock's value is important to him is at the time of acquisition or disposition of shares relative to intrinsic value, otherwise what does he care? He's more concerned with who's running the show, and knows each of his managers, just like he knows the businesses that Berkshire owns. So this is how I feel about EDUC, management has the past record to prove what they can do going forward in time!

    • Thanks, Nastradamus.

    • fritz, to your questions

      1) I have no idea
      2) sure, but it could go either way

    • I see your point and won't say I disagree. Do you think you will see a continual upward swing in EDUC share price without an increase in volume? It would seem that if you are investing for growth, you would hope that this small gem is ultimately more widely recognized on the street and institutions eventually get interested. I understand your philosophy that this has no bearing on intrinsic value. But intrinsic value isn't worth much unless it is eventually realized in share price. Do you think EDUC could ever realize its intrinsic value without some big boys taking interest?

    • <<As for Randall, he ought to have no problem securing a collateralized loan with his stock at very reasonable rates at any decent bank in Tulsa if he has liquidity issues.>>

      As you get older and look at the world around you, it's nice not to have to go into debt.
      Have you looked at the US dollar and states of economies, governments and terrorism lately ?


      <<But what's the real argument here? I think it's whether Randall should be doing more formal PR work to promote the stock.>>

      Agreed, except why not just hire a good industry PR firm and let them go to work promoting the stock, and the company can go on as is. Try it for a year and see what happens.


      <<I say no, I think more value will accrue to my long term investment in EDUC if Randall and the rest of management invest their effort and the company's money in growing the number and productivity of the sales consultants and in continuing to deliver a high level of operational efficiency at HQ and all the other things that have made the business a success.>>

      Do you think the consultants should just sit back and let potential cistomers come to them ?
      UBAH has changed their methods of recruiting in the past year, and the results speak for themselves. They've gotten much more accomodating and proactive, which helps everybody, as well as cuts down on attrition thru greater consultant excitement and interest due to making their jobs easier, and with more potential...imo.

      I can't believe anybody would argue against more sales efforts, no matter whether it's business or the stock.


      I'm for us, not against us !

      T

    • Chris's firm is a large owner - they have over 5% of the stock.

      As for Randall, he ought to have no problem securing a collateralized loan with his stock at very reasonable rates at any decent bank in Tulsa if he has liquidity issues.

      But what's the real argument here? I think it's whether Randall should be doing more formal PR work to promote the stock. I say no, I think more value will accrue to my long term investment in EDUC if Randall and the rest of management invest their effort and the company's money in growing the number and productivity of the sales consultants and in continuing to deliver a high level of operational efficiency at HQ and all the other things that have made the business a success.

      Trevor

    • I assure ya that if you were a large stockholder, it would matter to ya.

      Even Randall can't sell any shares because of low liquidity, and lets face it, even though he truly believes the stock is going much higher (and me too), it would not be imprudent for him to sell some shares along the way and use the money for more pleasures in life, or pay his new house mortgage off, or buy a new $100k+ luxury car every year, etc..

      Good liquidity is a wonderful thing to have in your stocks (and I've only really learned this the last couple of years)...and maybe it'll come...but we need more followers and buyers, whether reactively or proactively.

    • honestly, and I really mean it, I'd rather the smaller number, and here's why: (and this is not an original philsophy)...

      A shareholder base that does not trade the stock much tend to view themselves more like partners or true business owners, even if they are not part of the management. I see some of that with EDC. Shareholders who know the business, know the management, the product, and are interested in the long term health of the company. I think that tends to produce a better business because the management is less likely to fall prey to the Wall St. types that are only interested in next quarter. As with any good business, some times that which makes next quarter look good is not necessarily a good thing to do for the long-term.

      Now on the other hand, I find the low volume can be frustrating when I am looking to buy a stock, simply because below a certain size it's just not worth doing. Even then it really doesn't bother me much.

    • Agreed - and i'm not sure that you are disagreeing anymore. My only point is that volume is a factor in determining recognizable value. If it weren't, it would not be considered in calculating blockage discounts. Let me ask you this: Would you rather EDUC be trading at $12/sh with an average daily volume of 500,000 shares or trading at $12/sh with an average daily volume of 4,000 shares? Be honest.

    • fritz you're kind of cherry picking from my statements.

      As I noted, it is not unusual to buy or sell a stock of any size, in a negotiated block. So, no the volume is not as much of an issue. Combine that with some intelligent

      Again, if you're trading it short-term, then yes, it's much more important. But if you a long term investor, and you are looking for an orderly sale of your position, unless you are wreckless, you can very often sell at a reasonable price compared to the market if you have some patience.

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