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iShares Silver Trust Message Board

  • ext4r ext4r Oct 5, 2012 12:46 PM Flag

    Fact: Silver Always Crashes HARD in Elections

    In election years, silver often has gains early in the year, followed by substantial crashes as the election unfolds and the year ends. Here's the data:

    2008 - Silver rose Up 44% from January 1 to the high point, then crashed, ending the year with a 23% loss (67 point net lower difference going from PLUS 44% to MINUS 23% by the end of the year.

    2004 - Silver rose up 43% From January 1 to the high point early in the year, then crashed, losing MOST of the 43% gain and leaving only a 14% gain by the end of the year. (29 point net lower difference between high of the year, to the last day of the year)

    2000 - Silver rose up 3% From January 1 to the high point early in the year, then crashed, ending the year with a 15% loss (18 point net lower difference).

    1996 Silver rose up 14% early in the year, then ended the year with a 7% loss (21 point net lower difference)

    1992 Silver rose up 12% early in the year, then ended the year with a 6% loss (18 point net lower difference)

    1988 Silver rose up 19% early in the year, then ended the year with a 10% loss (29 point net lower difference)

    1984 Silver rose up 13% early in the year, then ended the year with a 30% loss (43 point net lower difference)

    1980 Silver rose up 43% early in the year, then ended the year with a 44% loss (87 point net lower difference

    The crashes in election years are substantial. Additionally, EVERY YEAR with substantial gains in January (as we had in 2012) has severe crashes later in the year.

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