Sat, Nov 29, 2014, 5:20 AM EST - U.S. Markets closed

Recent

% | $
Quotes you view appear here for quick access.

Chesapeake Energy Corporation Message Board

you are viewing a single comment's thread.

view the rest of the posts
  • jaydgee71 jaydgee71 May 16, 2012 2:23 PM Flag

    Moving averages

    I play specific moving average points because that is where the volume is. And where the sudden volume is, indicates where the big money is playing. Based on those average points, my entry and exit strategy goes into motion. The market moves on averages so please go elsewhere to convince someone else that "you make so MUCH MONEY"!

    SortNewest  |  Oldest  |  Most Replied Expand all replies
    • It's more important to not lose money than to not make alot of money. I doubt if you have enough experience to accurately play the moving averages.

      Most people that buy CHK are on the lower level of punters. It's more of a hackers stock IMO.

      • 1 Reply to rbillywhiskers
      • I have been playing the averages for over 12 years now and it has worked for me just fine. I also know the success of trading is capital preservation. Keep your losing positions to a minimum, know when to take profits of the table and move on. Its really not rocket science. Once you know the strategy is all about finding opportunities and be disciplined. I highly doubt you make money in this market if you don't play the averages to set your entry and exit points. That's just my opinion. Oh, and for the record, I am neither a long or a short, rather take either position according to what I see. In the case of CHK, I am currently short and not married to the stock, which means I can cover at any time and move on very easily should the circumstances dictate. I neither bash, nor pump, rather ride the direction the wave is moving.

 
CHK
20.26-2.78(-12.07%)Nov 28 1:01 PMEST

Trending Tickers

i
Trending Tickers features significant U.S. stocks showing the most dramatic increase in user interest in Yahoo Finance in the previous hour over historic norms. The list is limited to those equities which trade at least 100,000 shares on an average day and have a market cap of more than $300 million.